Alumna Anita Zaidi awarded $1million to save children’s lives in Pakistan village

first_imgPakistani physician Anita Zaidi, SM ’99, has won the first-ever $1 million Caplow Children’s Prize, the largest humanitarian prize worldwide dedicated to saving children’s lives. Zaidi’s project—aimed at reducing child mortality in Rehri Goth, an impoverished fishing village in southern Pakistan—was one of more than 550 projects submitted from around the world.Professor and chair of the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health at Karachi’s Aga Khan University, Zaidi plans to use the prize money in Rehri Goth to reduce neonatal deaths during the first 28 days of life, when children are most vulnerable. Currently, one out of every 17 babies in the village dies in the first 28 days after birth, and one out of nine dies before age five.Zaidi will work to eliminate malnutrition among expectant and new mothers and their babies, ensure that children have access to primary health care and immunizations, and train community health workers and midwives at Aga Khan University. She estimates that her project will reduce child mortality rates in the village by 65% and save the lives of nearly 200 children over the next two years. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Police reform in the spotlight

first_imgIn the weeks since George Floyd was killed by a white police officer, police reform has become a rallying cry, with many activists demanding states, cities, and towns defund their police departments and divert money spent to social supports and community resources instead. Some have called for the police to be abolished. Some lawmakers on Capitol Hill have responded to the call to overhaul the criminal justice system, but a lack of bipartisan consensus and competing reform bills has stalled any meaningful legislation.In that framework, several scholars addressed the question of police reform last week during an online talk sponsored by Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, exploring the nation’s history of policing, what it will take to overhaul a system seen as rife with misconduct and racism, and how America is failing to live up to its democratic beliefs.“I think the best statement of the movement for Black Lives Matter ideals right now are that the fundamental structure of society itself needs to be rethought, and that policing is just the prism to do this work,” said Harvard’s Brandon Terry, assistant professor of African and African American studies and social studies.Terry said steep economic inequality and low social mobility have brought the U.S. to a “crisis of legitimacy,” and the systems supporting those must be overhauled to help those in the “worst-off neighborhoods,” who are “really experiencing a kind of spectacular and mutually reinforcing tangle of structural and community violence.”“If you look at redlining, lead poisoning, incarceration, and unemployment, all of these things map rather neatly onto violent crime,” said Terry. “And amidst this crisis of legitimacy, we have set police off on a self-undermining task of using state-sanctioned violence, arrest, and confinement to enforce property law and criminal law against the most marginal and disadvantaged members of society.”,Terry said the cost of fixing these deep structural problems, a policing system that operates against a backdrop of distrust, “an adversarial approach to conflict fueled by litigation, and the most firearms of any society in the world,” and the use of race as a “proxy by police and citizens to justify surveillance, harassment, and other symbolic forms of violence against Blacks” are the most immediate problems to address.Princeton anthropologist Laurence Ralph took up the question of how law enforcement is funded. “Public funding is the lifeblood of the police system as we know it,” he said. “Yet it remains debatable as to whether or not that funding has made our society safer, especially for a person of color at the receiving end of the police officers’ command or the police officers’ violence.”Ralph, whose work and research has largely focused on Chicago, said that city paid $662 million to settle police misconduct claims between 2004 and 2016, and such settlements are a line item in a budget that typically allocates $1.46 billion dollars a year to policing. While calls to defund the police have been heard in Chicago for more than two decades, he said the current urgency is an opportunity to think strategically about what comes next.“It’s not merely a call for extracting resources. It’s also a call for reprioritizing resources, and thinking anew about what priorities and what society values … The question then becomes, how do we think in a holistic way that yes, provides community resources, but also strips away some of the power that enabled these forms of violence to happen in the first place?”During the panel discussion, Yale law professor and sociologist Monica Bell, Ph.D. ’18, said the process of significant police reform requires a “deep interrogation” of why communities of color have long distrusted the police.“The starting point, analytically and from a legal estrangement framework, is to say, ‘We’re not going to presume that there’s some something wrong and that something needs to be fixed within communities that distrust the police,’” said Bell, whose area of expertise includes criminal justice, welfare law, housing, and race and the law. “The starting point is to examine the institution and to examine specific processes of exclusion of racialized subordination, etc., that are flowing from that institution.” “It remains debatable as to whether or not that [public] funding has made our society safer, especially for a person of color at the receiving end of … the police officers’ violence.” — Laurence Ralph, Princeton The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. After the protest … what next? Changing the police also requires examining the country’s founding vision of democracy and asking difficult questions such as “What has been democratic about our country after all?” and “What can a new vision of democracy look like?” said Ralph, who co-directs Princeton’s Center on Transnational Policing. He called the number of guns and law enforcement agencies in the U.S. “unprecedented,” and major barriers to change. Envisioning police reform is difficult when so many officers worry they might have to “outgun this imaginary criminal that could sprout up at any moment,” he said, and reliable oversight of more than 18,000 police departments, each with its own distinct policies and procedures — a reflection of the nation’s history of states’ rights — is almost impossible. But Ralph suggested that one way forward is to begin the reform process at the “hyperlocal” level, with city councils, in the hopes that such efforts might spark a bigger wave of reform.Citing his research of more than 100 police torture cases from the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s, Ralph said another major challenge to police reform is the tendency to dismiss claims of police abuse when the victim has a criminal record. But efforts like those used during the Civil Rights era to focus attention on a “pristine victim” — someone like Rosa Parks, for instance — to highlight abuses suffered by Black Americans creates another problem. Putting forth only unimpeachable victims can lead to the “subtle and implicit argument” that those who “aren’t pristine” deserve to be brutalized, Ralph said.Addressing both history and the current moment, Terry, who recently taught the General Education course “Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Question of Conscientious Citizenship,” said the Black Lives Matter movement has pushed back against the “politics of respectability” by acknowledging that following societal expectations is neither “a reliable safeguard against mistreatment” nor “a reliable standard by how we should evaluate moral worth and the kind of civic standing that people should have.”During a Q&A session, many online viewers wondered whether changing the makeup of police departments to include more officers of color could make a difference. Bell called that “better than doing nothing,” but added that it’s “certainly not a pathway toward justice,” in large part due to police culture in the U.S.“Even if people kind of head into policing to do public service, to do justice … the culture around violence, around being dismissive of certain communities and certain types of people, often remains and even infects the people who do the work on a day-to-day basis,” she said.Virtual viewers were also eager to know how allies can best partner with communities victimized by police violence. In addition to donating money and demanding national leaders support police reform and reparations bills, said Terry, allies can help by “reliably showing up, putting their bodies on the line in protest. Because even the visual spectacle of you being there is doing important work.”Earlier in the day, Radcliffe Dean Tomiko Brown-Nagin, who introduced the virtual talk, testified before the U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties about First Amendment violations during recent protests against the killing of Floyd and other African Americans.,During her testimony, Brown-Nagin, a historian of the Civil Rights Movement, recalled authorities’ brutal attacks on the peaceful protests organized by Civil Rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. and the message King delivered in his final address.“If I lived in China or even Russia, or any totalitarian country, maybe I could understand some of these illegal injunctions. Maybe I could understand the denial of certain basic First Amendment privileges, because they hadn’t committed themselves to that over there,” Brown-Nagin said, quoting King. “But somewhere I read of the freedom of assembly. Somewhere I read of the freedom of speech. Somewhere I read of the freedom of press. Somewhere I read that the greatness of America is the right to protest for right.”Building on King’s argument, Brown-Nagin said the Constitutional rights of every person must be protected. “It is crucial that the individuals entrusted with upholding and enforcing the law do more than observe this bedrock principle of our democracy,” she said. “They must protect it.” Boston mayor discusses $12 million antiracism public health initiative at Chan School series Fatal encounters with policecenter_img Related Harvard experts talk about how to turn the moment’s energy into lasting change Walsh details thinking behind redeployment of police funds ‘Their Names’ project gathers the stories of 28,000 people, from Jan. 1, 2000, to George Floyd last_img read more

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See Willemijn Verkaik & More Belt Out ‘Let It Go’ in the Studio

first_img View Comments OK, listen. We know you can’t escape the unstoppable, chart-topping Frozen hit “Let It Go,” and you’re still contemplating whether or not to accept Idina Menzel’s apology for its global takeover. But even if you’ve mastered singing the song yourself at karaoke and had your cats perform the entire movie, we still think you’ll love this video. It shows all of the women behind Disney’s multi-language video of the Oscar-winning number. In addition to Menzel, be on the lookout for Willemijn Verkaik, the Dutch actress who has played Elphaba in Wicked on both sides of the Atlantic. Below the recording studio video is the original animated version, which shows good old Elsa doing her multi-language thing. last_img read more

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Corn Checkoff

first_img “Through corn research, education and promotion, everyone benefits,” said Dewey Lee, an Extension Service agronomist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “Corn is a $75 million dollar business here,” Lee said. “It affects corn farmers and also the processors and livestock industry, right on down to the people who buy meats at the grocery store.” The Corn Checkoff program provides a way for farmers to pay for research that will directly benefit them. Lee said Checkoff dollars funded almost all of the UGA corn research over the past three years. Georgia corn growers need to mark their Corn Checkoff ballots and put them in the mail before the March 2 deadline. Only farmers vote on the program, which supports corn research, education and marketing efforts in Georgia. But the Corn Checkoff affects everyone in the state, not just farmers, said a University of Georgia scientist. Benefits of research ÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿÿ — Tommy Irvin Research funding benefits all Georgians Some of the latest studies include: Testing transgenic and value-added hybrids for yield in Georgia. Creating hybrids that are resistant to disease and insects. Testing new insecticides and herbicides to improve efficiency. Developing new techniques to manage twin-row planting to get the best yields. Creating new irrigation recommendations. Controlling insects in stored corn. “We aren’t making any more land, and our farmers are having to feed more people.” “The farmers support this research with dollars from their crop, knowing the results will directly benefit them,” said Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Tommy Irvin. “In turn, that will keep them in business and keep the communities they spend their dollars in alive.” Irvin said of all crops, corn shows most clearly the benefits of research. Past hybridization research by U.S. scientists has raised yields from 40 bushels per acre to more than 250. Current research in Georgia, funded mostly by Checkoff dollars, will help farmers here grow more corn on fewer acres. “We aren’t making any more land, and our farmers are having to feed more people,” he said. “The research funded by these dollars will help us feed them more efficiently. We have to do (this research) well. And we have to do it now.” Lee reminds farmers that returning their marked Checkoff ballot is an important way to voice their opinions about funding research.last_img read more

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Week ahead: Tax reform talk, flood insurance, McWatters, OTR

first_img 17SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » NAFCU’s advocacy team will be working in overdrive this week as lawmakers take their next steps in dealing with the issues of financial industry regulatory relief, comprehensive tax reform and flood insurance.The coming week also includes a packed agenda for the NCUA Board’s June 23 open meeting, one day after agency Acting Chairman J. Mark McWatters testifies before the Senate Banking Committee.NAFCU will be reporting on these developments throughout the week. Here’s a closer look at each:Tuesday: House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., gives remarks on tax reform before the National Association of Manufacturers. News of Ryan’s scheduled address emerged as Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Ore., put out a call for proposals and feedback on how to overhaul the nation’s tax code. NAFCU is keeping lawmakers informed about the value to the nation’s economy of credit unions’ federal tax exemption.last_img read more

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Tax the rich? Post-pandemic recovery idea finds favor in UK

first_img“So it seems clear that those with plenty will more than survive the economic crisis generated by COVID-19,” he wrote in an article on non-profit media platform The Conversation.  The respected ranking of the country’s 1,000 richest people found they had collectively lost £54 billion ($68 billion, 60 billion euros) in the last few months alone.But it still calculated their combined wealth at £743 billion. On the list were 147 billionaires, 89 of them in London — the highest concentration in the world.Inventor James Dyson, known for his bagless vacuum cleaners as well as recently relocating to Singapore, topped the list for the first time, with an estimated wealth of £16.2 billion.”The general rule, despite the changing fortunes of individual rich folk, is that money continues to rain upwards,” said Rowland Atkinson, a University of Sheffield professor and author of “Alpha City: How London was captured by the super-rich”.  In billionaire-friendly Britain, where the global coronavirus outbreak has hit hard, the idea of making the wealthiest pay more tax to help economic recovery is gaining ground.Mass unemployment, bankruptcies and other potential shocks could hit the richest but supporters of tax reform say they should still shoulder more of the burden.Britain’s wealthiest have seen tens of billions of pounds wiped off their annual combined wealth — the first fall in a decade, according to the Sunday Times “Rich List”. Austerity again? Atkinson argues Britain’s wealthiest are “protected” by their connections to the ruling Conservative party and ability to tap government bailouts, as well as more questionable tactics.Some billionaires have even been accused of trying to take advantage of public money during the health crisis via emergency government schemes and a loosening of regulations.Greenpeace has criticized entrepreneur Richard Branson, who it said has not paid taxes in Britain for 14 years, for demanding a bailout to save his Virgin Atlantic airline. Meanwhile, the specter looms large of another decade of austerity to mirror the period after the 2008 financial crisis when inequality rose and hit the poorest hard.Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government, re-elected in December on a pledge to reduce regional inequalities, has spent tens of billions of pounds to cushion the virus fallout.But the deficit will explode to nearly £300 billion in 2020 and its financing will be a headache for his party, which has traditionally been reluctant to tax the rich.Johnson has suggested he will avoid excessive cuts to public services, given the backlash against the deeply unpopular austerity policies from 2010. He is also seen as unlikely to target the state-run National Health Service (NHS), whose doctors and nurses he credits with saving his life in hospital from COVID-19.NHS and other lower-paid frontline workers have been at the forefront of the fight against the pandemic, often paying with their lives.center_img ‘Big new proposals’ “I think these kind of events lay bare many of the underlying issues that have been present for much longer,” said Arun Advani, a professor at the University of Warwick. “The current government has shown that it is open to radical thinking to tackle the big questions now,” he added, pointing to government furlough schemes and state-backed loans. “I’m optimistic they are willing to consider big new proposals on raising tax as well,” he told AFP.A YouGov poll in mid-May indicated 61 percent of Britons backed a wealth tax on those with net worth of over £750,000. In a sign the idea is attracting increased attention, the Financial Times saw a record number of comments last month when it held a question-and-answer session on the topic. Richard Murphy, from London’s City University, said the UK tax system was highly regressive because it targets income at almost 10 times the rate of wealth, benefiting the better off.The tax expert conducted a study that found the government could raise up to £174 billion if it taxed wealth at the same rate as income.That could more than fund the NHS’ annual budget of around £120 billion. But Murphy suggested there were other ways the government could pick “low-hanging fruit”, including changes to income and capital gains taxes, allowances and reliefs.For Stanford University historian Walter Scheidel, the pandemic is precisely the kind of seismic world event that can spur change and reduce inequalities. “The coronavirus, like other plagues before it, could shift the balance between rich and poor,” he wrote in a New York Times article in April, “Why the wealthy fear pandemics”. Topics :last_img read more

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Trump says he will announce visa restrictions Sunday or Monday

first_imgPresident Donald Trump said on Saturday he would announce new restrictions on visas within a couple of days to block the entry of certain foreign workers and protect Americans struggling with a job market devastated by the coronavirus pandemic.”We’re going to be announcing something tomorrow or the next day on the visas,” he told Fox News Channel.Asked if there would be exclusions from the new restrictions, Trump said very few. The new action would be Trump’s latest step to restrict immigration in response to the pandemic and economic fallout.In April, he ordered a temporary block on some foreigners from permanent residence in the United States.He also announced new health-focused rules in March that allow for the rapid deportation of immigrants caught at the border and virtually cut off access to the U.S. asylum system.At the same time, he announced the land borders with Canada and Mexico would be closed to non-essential crossings, a measure that has been extended several times.Topics : “You need them for big businesses where they have certain people that have been coming in for a long time, but very little exclusion and they’re pretty tight,” he said. “And we may even go very tight for a period of time.”Trump, who has been expected to announce new restrictions, declined to provide further details.Critics have said Trump looked set to use the pandemic to achieve his longstanding goal of limiting immigration into the United States. His tough stance on immigration is central to his pitch to voters as he runs for re-election.Major American companies, particularly in the tech sector, have urged Trump to refrain from blocking the flow of foreign workers into the United States, saying it would hurt the economy.last_img read more

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Ocean Cleanup Tweaks, Redeploys Plastics Collecting System

first_imgThe Ocean Cleanup has completed another test campaign in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, proving that its latest design solved a major issue.“After a 6-week testing campaign, our main technical challenge is solved by modifying the system to move at a consistent speed through the plastic,” the company said.Namely, a consistent speed through the plastic has been achieved using the parachute anchor configuration.However, The Ocean Cleanup added that the technology is not proven yet, as overtopping needs to be addressed before the plastic is effectively retained in the System 001/B.The company has now upgraded the system’s screen, increasing it from the previous 4 inches above the water to be almost 20 inches above the water, using three rows of floats stacked on top of each other.On August 18, The Ocean Cleanup’s CEO, Boyan Slat, said that the upgraded screen with supersized cork line was on its way to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.The goal is to have the screen capture and retain the plastic without human aid for months at a time, with plastic harvested once in a while. The company is looking to remove at least 50% of the patch every five years by deploying a fleet of additional systems.The company started the initial testing phase last year when it deployed the System 001, also known as Wilson, in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.In mid-January 2019, the Wilson completed its 800-mile journey and was taken to Hilo Bay, Hawaii, after it suffered a fatigue fracture.“This was not ideal, but both the diagnosis and solution came quite easily. The more complicated challenge was the system’s inability to retain plastic; instead of consistently going faster than the plastic, it alternated between going faster and going slower than the plastic. This meant plastic would float into the system, as planned, but then float out again.”As there wasn’t a single obvious fix to this, the company decided to set up the upgraded design, System 001/B, in a more modular fashion. This allowed a configurations trial that both sped up the system and slowed it down, in an attempt to find one that would result in a consistent speed difference between the system and the plastic.“We launched System 001/B in late June, which was followed by a six-week testing campaign to test slowing down the system using a parachute anchor and test speeding up the system using large inflatable buoys.”The Ocean Cleanup’s mission is to rid the world’s oceans of plastic. The company’s starting point is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, the largest accumulation zone of plastic in the world.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Bulldogs JV Squad Winners Over Tigers

first_imgThe Batesville Bulldogs JV Baseball team wrapped up their season series with Lawrenceburg on Thursday evening coming out victorious by a score of 9 to 0. The Bulldog offense was consistent scoring at least one run in every inning except the sixth. They tallied 9 hits in total Brayden Linkel, Riley Zink, and Nate Eckstein each had two a piece. Six Bulldog hitters had an RBI. Along with the nine hits came 10 walks and 8 stolen bases.The Bulldogs were solid again defensively only committing one error but it didn’t amount to anything because Riley Zink was just about unhittable. He only gave up three hits in a shutout performance striking out 7 Tiger batters in 7 inning of work. He earned his first win of the season and drops his ERA to 1.46 on the season.Pitching continues to be a strength for the JV team as their team ERA is 2.37 through 9 games. The Bulldogs are scheduled to be back in action this Saturday with a pair of games against Madison at BHS the first one starting at 11 a.m.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Jason Meyer.last_img read more

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Xavi admits preparing to coach Barcelona

first_img Loading… Xavi has revealed his staff are preparing “a lot” to coach Barcelona as the Camp Nou great eyes a return. “It’s clear that after the elections the stage would be set, of course. I’m not ruling anything out. “They came for me in January, we were speaking. I told them the circumstances and timing weren’t right.” Barcelona’s next presidential election will take place in the summer of 2021 – usually a date in June – with current leader Josep Maria Bartomeu not seeking re-election. Xavi’s former team-mate Juan Antonio Pizzi believes the club legend is the ‘future of Barcelona’ and he is destined to return to his roots at manager when the right opportunity presents itself. “I think he evaluated the situation very well – there is the fact that he would be coaching former team-mates – but also the fact that he would be going home perhaps without the experience of having managed in La Liga,” Pizzi said. read also:Eto’o urges former team-mate Xavi to become the Barcelona manager “I think that led him to take the decision that he eventually took, to say: ‘Give me some time. I want to coach Barcelona and I think I’m prepared to do it but I think I have to develop myself a little bit more’. “I am absolute convinced that the future of Xavi and the future of Barcelona will come together at one point, I don’t know if in two years or five years or eight years but Xavi is going to be Barcelona coach, there is no doubt about that.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 The current Al-Sadd boss was linked with the Barca vacancy earlier this year when the La Liga champions sacked Ernesto Valverde, before they turned to Quique Setien in January. Barca have struggled to convince this season – the titleholders now two points behind bitter rivals Real Madrid in the race for La Liga glory with six matches remaining. While outlining his future plans for Barca, the 40-year-old insisted he will not come back unless he has the control to make decisions. “The biggest hope I have now is to be Barca coach and get Barca back to winning ways,” Xavi, who has led Al-Sadd to Qatari Super Cup and Qatar Cup silverware, said via Sport. “Not me but these players and Barca triumphing. And as a consequence, our technical staff, who are preparing for it a lot and it makes us really excited.” Xavi, who won 25 trophies during his playing career with Barca, added: “I’m a club man. I would like to return at the right moment to start a project from zero. “I’ve said it a lot of times but I want to take footballing decisions at Barcelona. Promoted Content12 Actors Who Can Only Play Bad GuysWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?6 Extreme Facts About HurricanesThe Funniest Prankster Grandma And Her GrandsonWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?The Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreThe Highest Paid Football Players In The WorldCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?7 Mind-Boggling Facts About Black Holes10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoThe Models Of Paintings Whom The Artists Were Madly In Love WithWhat Is A Black Hole And Is It Dangerous For Us All?last_img read more

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