Disabled actors have welcomed a new BBC scheme tha

first_imgDisabled actors have welcomed a new BBC scheme that aims to “shine a light” on experienced disabled performers, and discover and develop up-and-coming talent.The Class Act development programme will include an intensive three-day workshop and an opportunity to build contacts and showcase talents to professionals across the industry.Those selected to take part will be tutored in audition and camera technique, acting and business skills, and script and character work, and will have the chance to work with directors on scenes for their showreels.The Class Act programme is part of BBC’s efforts to support and raise the profile of disabled actors.But it is also part of wider efforts to increase the number of disabled people working across the BBC.Its target had been that disabled people would make up 5.3 per cent of all BBC staff by 2017, but the figures for March this year showed it had already smashed through that target, reaching 10.2 per cent (up from 3.7 per cent in 2014), while disabled people made up 9.6 per cent of those in leadership positions (up from 3.1 per cent).This means it has already exceeded its 2020 target of eight per cent.The 2020 target for portrayal of disability on-screen is that eight per cent of roles – including “some” lead roles – should portray or represent a disabled person, but the current figures will not be released until later this year.Three years ago, only 1.2 per cent of roles on screen portrayed or represented disabled people.Natalie Amber, a member of the deaf and disabled members committee (DDMC) of the performers’ union Equity, who herself plans to apply for the BBC programme, said she believed it was “a big step in the right direction”.She said previous BBC schemes, such as holding open auditions, had not helped disabled actors build up their skills, which the new programme should do.Amber had been forced to take five years out of the industry after she became disabled, and said she had since found it “very difficult” to find anywhere to practice acting to camera from a wheelchair.She said she hoped the programme would not be a one-off, and that future workshops would take place outside London.Amber – who appeared last year in the ITV thriller Paranoid and the BBC One drama Doctors – said it was difficult for disabled actors with support or access needs to take part in mainstream workshops, because they might need to pay for their own support worker or interpreter while the person leading the workshop might have never worked with a disabled actor before.She pointed out that the BBC was not the first broadcaster to hold such a workshop for disabled actors.ITV held a similar, but shorter, development workshop for disabled actors earlier this summer, based around its soap Emmerdale.And Coronation Street cast the disabled actor Liam Bairstow in 2015, after he was spotted through ITV’s Breaking Through Talent disability workshop.Amber said she hoped broadcasters and other parts of the industry would work together to improve opportunities for disabled actors.She said members of the DDMC were trying to “make our presence more widely known” and build their information resources, so “if people have any questions they have a place where they can come”.Cindy-Jane Armbruster, another member of Equity’s DDMC, also welcomed the new BBC scheme, but she said she was cautious about the difference it would make until she had seen its long-term impact.She said: “If it does make a difference, I would definitely like to see more of it. They need to keep at it.“I would like them to keep pushing for this, to keep being good allies.”She said she also hoped the initiative reached a “very diverse range of Deaf and disabled actors – diverse in terms of impairment, race/ethnicity, gender identity and sexual orientation, age, etc”.She said she was “very glad” that the BBC appeared to be making a “multi-pronged effort” to increase opportunities for disabled actors and the portrayal of disability on television, and that it was talking about casting disabled actors in roles not specifically written as disabled characters.Armbruster said efforts also needed to be made throughout the whole of the production process, to increase the numbers of disabled people working as writers, commissioners, casting directors and producers.She added: “This will hopefully lead to more interesting stories, and hopefully also widen the view of what disability looks like.”She said disability was “one of the most widely diverse characteristics” and it would be “exciting to see and celebrate just how different and individual we all are”.Alison Walsh, the BBC’s disability lead, who joined the broadcaster from Channel 4 in 2015, said: “On screen portrayal of disability is increasing on the BBC but disabled actors are still struggling to find a place – especially in roles not written specifically as disabled.“Although this scheme doesn’t guarantee work, it will provide training opportunities and exposure for new talent as well as established actors who have yet to have their ‘big break’.“Crucially it will provide a wake-up call to drama creators that they need to work harder to consider disabled acting talent for all productions – not just those with a disability theme.” Shane Allen, controller of BBC comedy commissioning, said: “It is crucial that we have more disabled people represented in our comedy output and bring through new disabled performing talent.“This is the most focused and practical way for us to unearth and nurture the talents out there who are looking for this career break.”Piers Wenger, controller of BBC drama, said: “This exciting new initiative will provide disabled actors with some of the finest training the BBC has to offer and give them the best possible chance to compete for opportunities.”To apply for the training programme, disabled actors should submit a self-taped audition that lasts two minutes or less.last_img read more

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Success and failure on two blocks of SFs Mission St

first_imgIn the past year, Mission activists have turned their sights on Mission Street where they would like to see restrictions on market-rate housing, more commercial controls on bars and upscale restaurants, and protections for small businesses.The efforts are couched in language to “save” the Mission. However, after a look at the businesses on two blocks of Mission Street between 19th and 21st, it is unclear if many enterprises need to be saved. Those businesses that are doing poorly could use what many small businesses in the city need: rent relief, more customers and a return to a time when e-commerce did not exist.At the same time, interviews with 50 of some 57 businesses offer a complex story of who is succeeding and why.   0% Tags: Business • mission street Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%center_img Slightly more than half — 29 — are doing well, and another 12 are doing fine.  Nine said they are doing poorly, including three that will be closing in the near to immediate future. Three older businesses — La Taza, Pete’s BBQ and Mikes Groceries and Liquor  — declined to comment for this story, but if full seats are any indication of prosperity, La Taza and Pete’s are doing very well.  In four other cases — including the three cell phone providers, AT&T, MetroPCS and Cricket Wireless — no one in authority could be reached to speak to the issue of how business was doing, but again, their stores are generally full.  One business, Barrel Proof, which replaces another bar, Cease and Desist, will open this weekend. Of the 47 businesses that reported doing “very well” to “well enough,” restaurants were the biggest group. And although activists would like to see fewer bars and restaurants, several owners said they would like to see more.Those businesses that are doing well cut across the divides of new and old businesses, and survive by attracting long-term and new residents as well as tourists passing through. Nearly all have had to adjust to an era of e-commerce, high rents and increases in the minimum wage. Businesses doing poorly seemed to be narrowly focused on serving a low-income clientele and had yet to attract newcomers. Some even talked about following their Latino clientele elsewhere, but figuring out exactly where that would be is not easy, because Latinos have moved to the East Bay, the Excelsior and beyond.  Of the 57 or so businesses between 19th and 21st Street on Mission Street, 20 reported that they had been open five to 10 years, with 15 surviving for 30 years or more, and another 12 have been open between 10 and 30 years. Ten businesses are newer and have been open for five years or less. RetailThe low-end retail stores that are doing well are ones that generally appeal to a broad swath of the population. Vanessa Porras, who has worked at Pikitos, a clothing store, since it opened four years ago, said an influx of tourists and visitors has benefited their store.“Even though a lot of our customers aren’t community-based, it does help the community a lot,” she said. Nearly 80 percent of Pikitos’ customers are out-of-towners, but this jump in business allows the store to maintain low prices on brand-name clothes and a $1 rack that provides fresh clothing to many homeless people. Dore Photo Studio, one block up, has maintained a steady clientele for nearly 70 years.  Mercy Padgett has worked at the studio for 23 years, and said the business relies on its legacy to survive. The grandmothers and mothers who took photos at the studio continue the tradition with their offspring, she said. And, like other long-time businesses, they have found clients among the newcomers. More recently, the studio switched to digital photography and began to do group photos for large companies like Yelp and Genentech. Business has slowed down a little in the last three years, Padgett said, but the changes help Dore’s maintain its spot in the Mission.Some smaller stores, however, are struggling, especially those that are aimed at the Latino customer. That decline has been well-documented. The 2010 U.S. Census shows that the Mission’s Latino population dropped to 48.1 percent from 58.8 percent in 2000. Based on a more recent estimate from the American Community Survey in 2016, the Hispanic population has dropped to 46.1 percent of the neighborhood’s population. The continued exodus has been felt by small shops that cater to Latinos. Alberto’s Printing has been open for 40 years. Owners Martha A. Perez and Ruben Perez say they will stay in business until their children complete college in four years. What they are fighting is not only the convenience of e-commerce but a diminished client base. Additionally, owners said, the new fear of immigration raids have made some Latinos afraid to go out and about to shop.  Narinder Anand, the 70-year-old owner of House of Jeans and Fashion Emporium on Mission Street, once owned 11 shops in the Mission District. His customers were primarily Latino, and he still relies on regulars to keep his 18-year-old business afloat.  “[Immigrants] are scared to come outside, everybody is scared.” said Anand, who always enjoyed his job because it allowed him to meet new people. “Right now it seems hard, but still we have customers.”Narinder Anand (70) owner, House of Jeans. Photo by Supriya Yelimeli.La Quinta, a Mexican restaurant on 20th and Mission street, has also struggled. It opened seven years ago as Latinos were leaving.The shop owner’s 60-year-old mother, Sonia Janet, agreed that the immigration climate has hurt her business.  What has saved them so far, she said, is that the business is owned, run and operated by family members. A few steps away, Francisco Marquez, 60, who has owned Andrea’s Shoes for five years, said business was “400 percent better five years ago.”People who leave the neighborhood never return, and businesses can either close or change the way they operate, he said.  The shoe store recently started advertising online and on Facebook, and employee Maribel Marquez, 28, said it helps a little. Marquez would like to follow the Latino population elsewhere, but he said it’s hard to define where to move, because there’s “not one place like the Mission” with a large population of working-class Latino people. Gilberto Garcia Rivera, moved into the space held for 70 years by Hellenic American Greek Imports eight years ago and kept its name. Two years ago, his rent increased to $5,000 a month. Selling knick-knacks, vintage goods and passport photos barely adds up to the $10,000 a month he needs to make.At the same time, as rents increased, he said, Muni’s bus-only lane reduced parking last February. His sales have dropped, and he will close his store in three months to seek employment somewhere else. RobberiesMore than anything, however, Rivera blames robberies — he has experienced four since he opened — for his decision to close. At 46, Rivera says he feels old. He has diabetes and says the stress is too much for him to handle. “I’m tired, I don’t want to do anything about my business anymore,” he said, adding that in his next job, he will be an employee rather than the boss. Mission Jewelry and Loan, at 2318 Mission St., which has been a fixture in the neighborhood for almost 50 years, will also close its doors within the next four months. The 77-year-old owner, Darryl Kaplan, was recently shot inside his store. The owner is recovering now, but Vic Pizarro III, a 37-year salesperson at the store, said the incident shook Kaplan and his family. “The business would have stayed open,” said Pizarro, adding that the armed robbery was the first time in his career that Kaplan had experienced such direct violence. “It’s been a long run and it’s been worthwhile, but it’s time.”One storefront, two servicesWhile some small businesses are faltering, others have improvised ways to stay open. Several have combined two businesses into one space. Take Offtop, a hat store that shares a storefront with Modern Haircuts on 19th and Mission Street. It creates custom Bay Area Sports team caps that are a hit with tourists, according to 28-year-old owner Daniel Reyes. The store also does custom embroidery for business uniforms, and Reyes said he recently got a commission to create dozens of hats and polo T-Shirts for La Taza. Modern Haircuts has survived in the Mission for more than 10 years, and Reyes said hats and haircuts have worked well together to attract more customers.Seven-year-old mobile repair store Compupod, at 2433 Mission St., recently started delivering services at clients’ homes. Hugo Gonzalez, the shop owner, also rents out a portion of his storefront to a laptop repair service.Yolanda (36) and Hugo Gonzales (33), owners of Compupod. Photo by Supriya Yelimeli.Across the street, Gonzalez’s father and uncle have owned Angie’s Jewelry for 15 years. The store began online sales last week, and the store continues to offer check cashing, and jewelry and watch repair.Ramon Gonzales (father of Hugo Gonzales, above, 62) at Angie’s. Photo by Supriya Yelimeli.RestaurantsOf the 10 restaurants and cafes in this two-block stretch, four are new and some, like Jim’s, have been in the neighborhood for years. Jim’s has been on Mission Street for 70 years. Some of the establishments suggested that the street needed more restaurants — not fewer, as some activists would like to see.Ok Un Kim, (59) owner of Jim’s. Photo by Supriya Yelimeli.One of those was Danny Garland, the bartender at Gashead Tavern. More bars will fuel business on Mission Street, he said. Patrons can then hop from one busy location to another and eat at hole-in-the-wall spots, instead of being diverted to Valencia Street. A Mission Street lined with bars, however, butts up against a moratorium on liquor licenses put into place to diminish the impact that too many bars can have on an area. Gashead’s revenue has been up and down since it opened four years ago, but Garland said a current upswing in customers gives him hope. He fears gentrification on Mission Street, like many other business owners, but said good service and quality will always keep customers coming back. Laundre and Lotus Indian, both new spots that opened up in the last three to four months, say business is thriving. Ariana Roviello, the owner of Laundre, said the cafe gets busier every day. Word of mouth is a big boost for her and the cafe has maintained high online rating.Mark Finein, the general manager at Myriad on 2491 Mission St., also said he relies on ratings to draw customers. Finein said restaurants need to be vigilant about quality if they want to keep their footing in a market like San Francisco.He said the Mission has reached a “critical mass” of cafes and lunch spots, but he said there is still room for more cocktail bars and dinner restaurants. When Andrea Fogelbach moved to San Francisco nearly 17 years ago, she was able to live in the Mission District with a rent of $450 a month. She opened up Mateo’s Taqueria two years ago near the intersection of 20th and Mission streets, and the restaurant has had to adapt quickly to retain employees.Mateo’s, which has a monthly rent of $4,500, has consistently paid above minimum wage to compete with other businesses, and Fogelbach insists that older shops will perform well if they keep an open mind and match the “activist history” of the neighborhood. This includes letting workers attend protests, and interacting with new business owners who want to positively serve the neighborhood. Fogelbach said that older businesses and restaurants have to be flexible, including paying higher wages to keep workers, creating simplified menus and catering to newcomers with bright, newly designed storefronts. She sees property thefts and robberies as something that comes with the territory. “No matter how many new businesses we have here, no matter how many changes, it’s still the Mission,” she said. Lydia Chávez and Stefania Rousselle contributed to this article.last_img read more

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Neighborhood Notes Presidential candidates swing by Mannys

first_img Subscribe to Mission Local’s daily newsletter Breed, Ronen celebrate Mission cleanupMayor London Breed and Supervisor Hillary Ronen will turn out Friday, May 3 to celebrate a massive cleanup effort along the Mission’s sidewalks. Since November, San Francisco’s Downtown Streets Team has worked with a team of 30 unhoused volunteers to clean up sidewalks in the Mission from Division Street to 24th Street. In the process, these volunteers are working toward getting housing and jobs. So far, they’ve picked up more than 82,550 gallons of trash and more than 1,171 needles. Two of the volunteers have found jobs and one has secured stable housing, according to a spokesperson with the Streets Team. Breed and Ronen will speak at a celebration of their work May 3 at 12:30 p.m. in Chan Kajaal Park, at 17th and Folsom streets. Lunch and games will follow. To register for the free event, sign up here. Wild art show opens by Dolores ParkSan Francisco artist Cheney Beshara is opening a new show of her paintings Friday, April 26, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Bebebar. Her latest collection of works, titled Wild, features colorful paintings of camels, elephants, giraffes, lions and zebras. Bebebar, a cafe known for its açaí bowls and smoothies, is located at 3809 18th St., across from Dolores Park. The event is free. Email Addresscenter_img Manny’s hosting five presidential hopefulsFive candidates in the crowded race for the Democratic presidential nomination will visit Manny’s over the next five weeks, including Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, former United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julián Castro, Sen. Amy Klobuchar and Sen. Cory Booker. Hickenlooper visits Manny’s for a happy hour on Friday, April 26 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Inslee will appear next week on Thursday, May 2, at 5:30. Castro’s visit comes on Wednesday, May 15 at 5:30 p.m. Klobuchar will appear Thursday, May 30 from 8 to 9:30 p.m. and Booker’s visit is scheduled for Sunday, June 2 at 10 a.m. in a reception with the Young Professionals. To find out more about each event, click the links on each of the candidate’s names. last_img read more

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JAMIE Foster has joined Bradford BullsThe winger

first_imgJAMIE Foster has joined Bradford Bulls.The winger has signed a one-year contract after Saints agreed to release the 22-year-old.Foster burst on to the scene in 2010 when he made his debut against Toulouse and went on to score 34 tries and 341 goals in 53 appearances for the club.But he fell down the pecking order in 2012 and went on loan to Hull FC to gain valuable first team experience.Jamie said: “I really enjoyed my time at Saints and I am thankful for the opportunity they gave me. I would like to thank the fans for their support.“Now, I am looking forward to joining the Bulls and working with Francis Cummins.“I know I’m a good player and I know I can score tries and kick goals and I’m looking forward to getting my head down and producing the form that I know I’m capable of.“Working with new people will be good and hopefully bring out the best in me. When i got the opportunity at Hull, it was a case of kicking on again and hopefully the same thing can happen again at Bradford.”We will have an in-depth interview with Jamie on his time at Saints next week.last_img read more

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FOREIGN Exchange trading company AFEX welcomed rug

first_imgFOREIGN Exchange trading company AFEX welcomed rugby league and rugby union players to their offices in London for a charity trading day to benefit Rugby League Cares and Restart Rugby.Saints Jon Wilkin and Mark Flanagan were at the event.AFEX are partners of the Saints and sponsor the front of our shorts.You can see the video here.last_img

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DAY 13 – Both teams came out to face a big crowd

first_imgDAY 13 – Both teams came out to face a big crowd at the Cabramatta club, swelled by the Saints’ travelling parents and families.The Parramatta side were visibly larger than their young academy Saints side – but your Saints didn’t disappoint in a real classic.As the game got underway Saints struggled to gain any field position and it came as no surprise when they finally succumbed to another barnstorming run from the Eels big second row who fed his centre to score outside after five minutes.It ttok a while, but Saints were slowly finding their feet on this hot, humid Australian afternoon and on 16 minutes great vision by Rob Fairclough spotted Parramatta were short on the right – the half back finding the impressive fullback Matty Costello who in turn attracted the centre and wing before feeding Jordan Gibbons to go in unopposed.A period of sustained pressure by the home side and some indiscipline by the inexperienced Saints resulted in the referee awarding the Parramatta side a number of penalties (which hopefully the boys will learn from).This meant the Eels gained good field position and scored two quick tries, one converted, to give them a deserved 16-6 lead.Good leadership qualities from (on the day captain) Brad Billsborough and some strong carries from the reliable Matty Lees and powerful Levy Nzoungou and George Lewtas kept Saints in the arm wrestle though, and at the half hour mark a well-worked try down the right again saw Gibbons go in for his and Saints’ second try.16-10 down at halftime, coach Derek Traynor told his charges to cut out errors and gain field position. He also told them to keep playing in the correct parts of the field.And it seemed to work as the second half couldn’t have started better for Saints.A fumble by Parramatta gave Saints good field position and the half back partnership of Elliot Jenkins and Rob Fairclough duly obliged in putting Matty Costello away who in turn fed the impressive and improving Lewis Furlong to score.Gibbons converting to level the scores.The next 20 mins became an arm wrestle with no further scores and both sides tired in the heat and came up with some basic errors.But with only two minutes left Parramatta showed how much the game meant to them by going for a drop goal to make the score 17-16.Cometh the hour… with no time at all left on the clock Saints came up with a massive defensive effort and forced their opposition to knock on.A quickly formed scrum ensued and two plays later Saints put on the play of the game, Fairclough out the back finding his new half back partner in Jack Unsworth who in turn found a sublime short pass to the hard working impressive second rower Chris Follin who showed his pace to score in the corner.Conversion was missed but who cares! This young Saints academy side never know when they are beaten.At the end of the game former coach and now Parramatta’s director of football Daniel Anderson picked out a couple of lads for ‘best’ and ‘fairest’ in Chris Follin and Lewis Furlong.Special mentions also have to go to Rob Fairclough and Matty Costello too.Coach Derek Traynor described the victory as one of the best ever on any tour, against a big, committed and well organised Parramatta side.The toughest challenge is yet to come with Penrith at the Pepper Stadium this weekend!By Eric Frodshamlast_img read more

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This season has been one of the most memorable in

first_imgThis season has been one of the most memorable in living memory with Head Coach Justin Holbrook marshalling his team to an incredible 21 wins from 23 regular season games.The team have dazzled the Betfred Super League with their attacking flair and style as well as their grit to win some nail-biting and hard-fought clashes.It leaves them on the verge of their first League Leaders’ Shield since 2014, with a Grand Final appearance a very real possibility.The team have delivered on what our Members wanted … entertainment and a winning mentality fitting of the Saints’ famous name. We can say well and truly we are SAINTS AND PROUD!As we look towards 2019, we want to continue with this ethos.Our squad has already been strengthened further with the additions of NRL stars Joseph Paulo and Kevin Naiqama to complement our already strong core of experienced players and young guns.We want you to continue the journey with us in 2019, so we have again expanded your exclusive Membership benefits, including for the next Generation of Saints fans – our Junior Members.You can also make your Membership a simple monthly payment with our very popular Direct Debit plan. Each season lots of fans take advantage of the plan to pay for their Membership over ten months to spread the cost.Alternatively, you can also take up an eight or six month package later on in the off-season.For example a West Stand renewal for an adult would equate to just £25.06 per month.An adult and child in the Family Stand would be just £27.49 per month.Your Membership covers all Saints’ Betfred Super League home games and to discover Benefits, Prices and more here www.saintsrlfc.com/membershipsWe are Saints and Proud#saintsandproudlast_img read more

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First Team Match

first_imgThe boss previewed the game yesterday declaring the Tigers as a “dangerous” side and he knows despite the six wins out of six, his Saints players will need to be on top of their game if we want to maintain our 100% start to the new Super League season.Holbrook will select his 17 from:1. Jonny Lomax, 2. Tommy Makinson, 3. Kevin Naiqama, 4. Mark Percival, 5. Regan Grace, 6. Theo Fages, 8. Alex Walmsley, 9. James Roby, 10. Luke Thompson, 11. Zeb Taia, 12. Joseph Paulo, 13. Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook, 15. Morgan Knowles, 16. Kyle Amor, 17. Dom Peyroux, 19. Matty Lees, 20. Jack Ashworth, 21. Aaron Smith, 23. Lachlan Coote. —————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————Castleford Tigers 19-Man Squad 1. Peter Mata’utia, 2. James Clare, 3. Greg Minikin, 4. Michael Shenton, 5. Greg Eden, 6. Jake Trueman, 8. Liam Watts, 9. Paul McShane,  10. Grant Millington, 11. Oliver Holmes, 13. Adam Milner, 14. Nathan Massey, 15. Jesse Sene-Lefao, 16. Junior Moors, 17. Alex Foster, 18. Matt Cook, 25. Tuoyo Egodo, 32. Jordan Rankin, 33. Chris Clarkson.,1. Jonny Lomax, 2. Tommy Makinson, 3. Kevin Naiqama, 4. Mark Percival, 5. Regan Grace, 6. Theo Fages, 8. Alex Walmsley, 9. James Roby, 10. Luke Thompson, 11. Zeb Taia, 12. Joseph Paulo, 13. Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook, 15. Morgan Knowles, 16. Kyle Amor, 17. Dom Peyroux, 19. Matty Lees, 20. Jack Ashworth, 21. Aaron Smith, 23. Lachlan Coote.last_img read more

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Club Match Ticket

first_imgThe Flash discount has been extended until 5pm on Sunday 19 May.Any 2019 Members who have purchased their tickets outside of the offer between 1st – 15th May can contact the Ticket Office for details of how to redeem the offer if they missed out. Any refunds must be claimed by 5pm on Monday.2019 Half-Members are also eligible for the discount.Limited numbers of tickets are available for the match and the full Weekend schedule of fixtures by calling 01744 455052, visiting the Club Ticket Office at the Totally Wicked Stadium or online here.The flagship event that has been played in a variety of cities across the UK since its inception, will make its arrival to the City of Liverpool. The iconic venue of Anfield Stadium will play host to the annual festival of Rugby League that is the Dacia Magic Weekend.Saints will face off in a huge clash against the Castleford Tigers in the final slot on the evening of Sunday 26 May (KO 6pm)The Saints and Tigers have taken part in some incredible matches in recent times across both the League and Cup competitions, including last second drop goals, incredible comebacks and featured some magnificent Rugby League.Prices are:Weekend:Mem AdultMem ConcMem JuniorAdultConcessionJuniorCAT 1: Main Stand Reserved£37.50£25£18.75£75£50£37.50CAT2: Kenny Dalglish Unreserved£30£20£15£60£40£30CAT3: Kop Stand Unreserved£20£15£10£40£30£20Day:Mem AdultMem ConcMem JuniorAdultConcessionJuniorCAT 1: Main Stand Reserved£25£17.50£12.50£50£35£25CAT2: Kenny Dalglish Unreserved£20£12.50£10£40£25£20CAT3: Kop Stand Unreserved£12.50£10£6.25£25£20£12.50Concessions are 65+, Students, Serving Military and NHS Staff whilst juniors are 16 & Under and all children under the age of two are free of charge but still require a ticket.All fans who wish to purchase wheelchair spaces should contact the RFL on 0844 856 113 or email: ticketing@rfl.co.uk.Saints do have ambulant disabled tickets available via the Club ticket office.Coach Travel is available to purchase from the Club priced at £9 for 2019 Members and £10 for non-members.2019 Dacia Magic Weekend fixtures:Saturday May 252pm – Wakefield Trinity v Catalans Dragons4.30pm – Hull FC v Huddersfield Giants7pm – Wigan Warriors v Warrington WolvesSunday May 261pm – Salford Red Devils v Hull Kingston Rovers3.30pm – Leeds Rhinos v London Broncos6pm – Saints v Castleford Tigerslast_img read more

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Could arming teachers affect school insurance policies

first_img It is an idea shut down by most state leaders including State Superintendent Mark Johnson.“We’re not at that point yet,” Johnson said. “I have come out publicly and said that I am a supporter of the Bill of Rights. I’m a firm supporter of the Bill of Rights. But when I was a teacher I can tell you I would not have been comfortable carrying one of my firearms in a classroom.”Right now, Brunswick, Columbus, New Hanover, Bladen and Pender County Schools have not discussed arming teachers nor do they plan to.Related Article: West Bladen student dies from injuries suffered in weekend car crashAs for Whiteville City Schools they have not talked about it yet, but they plan to discuss all available options.“These are discussions that are just getting started,” Johnson said.A major player in the decision to arm teachers could be the insurance industry.The last time arming teachers was seriously considered was after the 2012 Sandy Hook massacre. Insurers across the nation quickly put a stop to the idea.“The question of insurance that would be something that would have to come up if we actually start looking at polices that would allow teachers to carry firearms,” Johnson said.WWAY reached out to our school’s insurance companies regarding the possibility of arming teachers.Liberty Mutual insures New Hanover County Schools.They sent WWAY the following statement:“Liberty Mutual Insurance does not automatically decline a school because they have decided to authorize certain individuals to carry firearms. If a school board chooses, pursuant to its authority under state law, to authorize specific school employees to possess certain firearms on school property, we would underwrite the exposure as we would any other exposure, by evaluating exposure characteristics, school protocols and controls, risk management approach, and the legal environment.”WWAY reached out to NC School Boards Trust who insures Brunswick, Bladen, Pender, Columbus Counties and Whiteville City Schools for comment. They have still not returned our calls or emails. NEW HANOVER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — While many schools have heard about the possibility of arming teachers in the classroom, most schools in our area have not even entertained the idea.However, if that were an option the insurance industry might have the final say.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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