Macro not micro modified theories of gravity

first_img Supercomputer shows ‘Chameleon Theory’ could change how we think about gravity When it comes to cosmology, the macro scale is important. As scientists search for the reasons behind the increasing rate at which the universe is expanding, they modify Einstein’s theory of gravity and delve into dark energy theories to explain this counter-intuitive phenomenon. Citation: Macro, not micro: modified theories of gravity (2007, February 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-02-macro-micro-theories-gravity.html These simple modifications are represented as f(R) theories, and they are used to explain what is seen on a cosmic scale. But there’s a problem. “Some modified theories of gravity have nice features for cosmology, on the big scale, but they don’t work so well on the small scale,” Gonzalo Olmo explains to PhysOrg.com. “I managed to solve these equations on the micro level, and I found that they are inconsistent.”Olmo, 28, is a post-doc at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He says he solved these equations two years ago, but waited until interpreting them to have them published. His recent letter in Physical Review Letters, which puts forth the equations and their interpretations, is titled “Violation of the Equivalence Principle in Modified Theories of Gravity.” In the Letter, Olmo presents equations that suggest that when some modified theories of gravity are applied to the micro scale, new properties emerge that can effectively rule out some theories that explain accelerating universe expansion.“If we manage to show these theories are not consistent, which it looks like, then this approach in cosmology would be useless,” Olmo points out. He says that there are two main ways modified theories are studied: in the metric formalism or in the Palatini formalism. Olmo explains that his paper focuses on theories of gravity in the Palatini formalism. “[T]he connection is regarded as independent of the metric and, therefore, must be determined by solving its corresponding field equations,” the paper says.Olmo says that when he solved the equations on the micro scale, he noticed the emergence of new properties: “These new properties have never been seen in other modified theories of gravity, and these new properties are what make these theories so weird on the micro scale.”Even though Olmo says that these theories would not do to explain the expansion of the universe, since they are inconsistent on the micro scale, there are some uses for modified theories of gravity. He explains that the differences between how these modified theories work on the macro scale and on the micro scale could offer insight into the interaction between gravitation and quantum physics. “According to Einstein,” Olmo explains, “spacetime should be nearly flat in, for instance, your dining room or the interior of an atom.” He pauses before continuing: “However, in Palatini theories we find that it is curved even on a micro level, which has a strong effect on the properties of the quantum world. This can lead to better understanding by seeing how these modified theories of gravity interact with quantum theory.” “There are different possibilities to the reasons behind the acceleration of the universe,” continues Olmo. “Some theorists use dark energy to explain the expansion, and others modify the equations of gravity to say it is not dark energy. However, there could be a mix.” He says that it is very difficult to distinguish the effects of dark energy from those of modified equations, and the difference could hold the key to discovering what’s behind the increasing rate of expansion of our universe. And he thinks applying modified theories of gravity to the micro scale as well as to the macro scale could help determine the different effects. “If this idea can get going,” he enthuses, “there could be a very interesting future.” By Miranda Marquit, Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.center_img Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Manipulating Magnetism for Future DataStorage Devices

first_img Light may increase magnetic memory speeds 1000 times, decrease electricity consumption Citation: Manipulating Magnetism for Future Data-Storage Devices (2007, April 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-04-magnetism-future-data-storage-devices.html In an important step toward future data-storage technologies based on magnetism, a research group has determined how to control the magnetization of a “magnetic vortex,” a curling nanometer-sized magnetic structure present within tiny, millionth-of-a-meter-sized magnetic disks. Understanding the behavior of this type of structure is one of the main requirements of magnetic data-storage development. A graphical representation of the magnetization of a magnetic disk with a rotating vortex. a-f, Over a time period of about 20 nanoseconds, the magnetization of the core (represented by the spike in the center of the disk) moves circularly around the disk´s center. Simultaneously, the magnetization switches from upward to downward and begins to switch back to upward. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The group, led by scientists at Kyoto University in Japan, found a way to manipulate the magnetization of the vortex’s core without applying an external magnetic field to the disk. Instead, they applied a current.“We have taken advantage of the way the vortex responds to an applied current,” said corresponding Kyoto University scientist Teruo Ono to PhysOrg.com. “A current of the right strength resonates with the vortex, causing it to rotate at a high speed – several hundred meters per second. This motion produces a strong dynamic magnetic field that opposes the vortex’s own magnetization, and reverses it.”Although the applied current is electrical in nature, being based on electrons, it isn’t a stream of moving electrons. It is a “spin current,” a stream of moving spins. Spin is an intrinsic property of electrons that essentially imparts them with a tiny magnetic field, or magnetic “moment,” pointing either up or down. If several electrons are placed in a row, a spin can propagate down the line; many propagating spins produces a spin current.Across the globe, teams of researchers are working to build viable spin-based electronic devices – spintronics – using spin currents. This group’s work opens the possibility that simple magnetic disks can serve as the building blocks for spintronic devices like memory cells, where each bit of information would be stored as the direction of the vortex-core’s field. Vortex-core switching could be an efficient way of writing data to a memory device.The physics underlying this result is the tension created between the spin direction of the conduction electrons and the direction of the individual magnetic moments that make up the overall magnetic field of the vortex core. When they are positioned relative to each other at a specific angle, the spin current applies a torque to each moment, forcing the whole core to rotate.“This spin-transfer effect liberates us from having to apply a large external magnetic field in order to control magnetic devices, which means we can avoid the expense and effort required to maintain such large fields,” Ono added.This research is described in the March 18, 2007, online edition of Nature Materials.Citation: Keisuke Yamada, Shinya Kasai, Yoshinobu Nakatani, Kensuke Kobayashi, Hiroshi Kohno, André Thiaville, and Teruo Ono, Nature Materials advance online publication, 18 March 2007 (DOI 10.1038/nmat1867)Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Explore furtherlast_img read more

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New study disputes notion that men are better at spatial thinking than

first_img Spatial problems are those that exist in the three dimensional physical world, rather than as themes or ideas. Figuring out how to fit randomly shaped objects into a single whole, for example, as is needed in building a stone fence perhaps, shows an ability to imagine how things will fit together as the project moves along, rather than using trial and error, demonstrates spatial reasoning. Spatial abilities are often believed to be a requisite for doing well in math and other sciences, particularly engineering and physics. Thus the debate about inherent gender abilities takes on more meaning in the academic world. In their study, Hoffman and his team went to India where they found two very similar cultures living very nearly side by side – with one major difference. One was patrilineal (mostly run by males), the other matrilineal (mostly run by females). To test their theory that culture has more to do with spatial ability than gender, they paid 1,279 adult volunteers of both genders from both groups to assemble a wooden puzzle as quickly as they could; a task they believe that requires spatial abilities. They found that men from the patrilineal group performed the task on average 36% faster than women from the same group. With the matrilineal group however, no discernable time difference between the genders was found, indicating, according to the group, that differences in culture lead to differences in ability to solve a spatial problem rather than gender.Others however are still not convinced; some suggest that assembling a wooden puzzle doesn’t truly demonstrate spatial abilities at all since it’s actually just a two dimensional puzzle. Others add that the differences found in the study could be due to other cultural differences such as the desire to please.In either case, the research does show that differences in problem solving abilities can occur due to cultural differences and that more research is needed before making any definitive conclusions one way or the other. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — Throughout much of human history, it has been assumed by both men and women that men are somehow better able to solve so-described spatial problems than are women. This apparent discrepancy has been used to explain the differences in the numbers of men versus women receiving doctoral degrees in the math and sciences, at least in the United States. Now however, new research by Moshe Hoffman, a researcher from the University of California and colleagues suggests that conventional thinking might be wrong. He and his team have published a paper on the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that suggests that spatial ability comes more as a result of the environment in which a person is raised, rather than from gender. Explore further More information: Nurture affects gender differences in spatial abilities, PNAS, Published online before print August 29, 2011, doi:10.1073/pnas.1015182108AbstractWomen remain significantly underrepresented in the science, engineering, and technology workforce. Some have argued that spatial ability differences, which represent the most persistent gender differences in the cognitive literature, are partly responsible for this gap. The underlying forces at work shaping the observed spatial ability differences revolve naturally around the relative roles of nature and nurture. Although these forces remain among the most hotly debated in all of the sciences, the evidence for nurture is tenuous, because it is difficult to compare gender differences among biologically similar groups with distinct nurture. In this study, we use a large-scale incentivized experiment with nearly 1,300 participants to show that the gender gap in spatial abilities, measured by time to solve a puzzle, disappears when we move from a patrilineal society to an adjoining matrilineal society. We also show that about one-third of the effect can be explained by differences in education. Given that none of our participants have experience with puzzle solving and that villagers from both societies have the same means of subsistence and shared genetic background, we argue that these results show the role of nurture in the gender gap in cognitive abilities.center_img © 2011 PhysOrg.com Gender gap in spatial ability can be reduced through training Citation: New study disputes notion that men are better at spatial thinking than women (2011, August 31) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-08-disputes-notion-men-spatial-women.htmllast_img read more

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Report of discovery of large object in far outer edges of solar

first_img One of the objects was found to be near W Aquilae in the night sky—the other adjacent to Alpha Centauri . Both groups report being skeptical at first regarding a faint glow, but monitored what they had seen nonetheless—to their surprise they found that the objects appeared to move relative to the stars behind them, which suggested they might be relatively close and that they might be orbiting the sun. Neither group was able to gain much evidence regarding the properties of the objects they had spied, because both of them were only able to make two observations, but both teams suggest there was enough data to allow for ruling out the object being an ordinary star.The Swedish team nick-named the object they observed Gna, after a Nordic God known for its swiftness, and have told the press they had no intention of suggesting they had found the mythical Planet X which supposedly lies somewhere beyond Pluto. Instead they suggest it might be a large asteroid. The team from Mexico went a little further suggesting that the object they observed might possibly turn out to be a brown dwarf.There is also the possibility, as some astronomers who have read the two papers suggest, that either or both of the objects are merely illusions, random blips or noise that for a moment or two appeared to take the shape of a very far away object. Some have even tweeted their opinions, insinuating that jumping on the Planet X bandwagon would be sheer folly.Despite the skepticism, it is likely that other research groups will be training their instruments on the piece of sky where the objects were possibly seen, to prove or disprove their existence and to put a stop to the conjecture. Both of the teams involved have voiced their support of such efforts, noting that they would like an explanation for what they observed. ALMA prototype-antennas at the ALMA test facility. Credit: ESO Explore further (Phys.org)—Two separate teams of researchers (one from Mexico, the other Sweden), have incited skepticism among the astronomy community by posting papers on the preprint server arXiv each describing a different large object they observed in the outer edges of the solar system. Both teams made their observations after reviewing data from ALMA—a cluster of radio dishes in the Chilean mountains. Astronomers spot most distant object in solar system More information: A new submm source within a few arcseconds of α Centauri: ALMA discovers the most distant object of the solar system, arXiv:1512.02652 [astro-ph.SR] arxiv.org/abs/1512.02652The serendipitous discovery of a possible new solar system object with ALMA, arXiv:1512.02650 [astro-ph.SR] arxiv.org/abs/1512.02650center_img © 2015 Phys.org Journal information: arXiv Citation: Report of discovery of large object in far outer edges of solar system incites skeptical reactions (2015, December 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-12-discovery-large-outer-edges-solar.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Scientists solve 400yearold mystery of Prince Ruperts drops

first_img Journal information: Applied Physics Letters Citation: Scientists solve 400-year-old mystery of Prince Rupert’s drops (2017, May 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-scientists-year-old-mystery-prince-rupert.html More information: H. Aben et al. “On the extraordinary strength of Prince Rupert’s drops.” Applied Physics Letters. DOI: 10.1063/1.4971339 To do this, Chandrasekar and Chaudhri began collaborating with Hillar Aben, a professor at Tallinn University of Technology in Estonia. Aben specializes in determining residual stresses in transparent three-dimensional objects, such as Prince Rupert’s drops.In the new study published in Applied Physics Letters, Aben, Chandrasekar, Chaudhri, and their coauthors have investigated the stress distribution in Prince Rupert’s drops using a transmission polariscope, which is a type of microscope that measures the birefringence in an axi-symmetrical transparent object, such as a Prince Rupert’s drop. In their experiments, the researchers suspended a Prince Rupert’s drop in a clear liquid, and then illuminated the drop with a red LED. Using the polariscope, the researchers measured the optical retardation of the light as it traveled through the glass drop, and then used the data to construct the stress distribution throughout the entire drop. Why water splashes—new theory reveals secrets Fringes throughout a Prince Rupert’s drop indicate residual stresses. Credit: Aben et al. ©2017 American Institute of Physics As the researchers explain, these values give the droplet heads a very high fracture strength. In order to break a droplet, it’s necessary to create a crack that enters the interior tension zone in the drop. Since cracks on the surface tend to grow parallel to the surface, they cannot enter the tension zone. Instead, the easiest way to break a drop is to disturb the tail, since a disturbance in this location allows cracks to enter the tension zone. Overall, the researchers believe that the results finally explain the great strength of Prince Rupert’s drops.”The work has fully explained why the head of a drop is so strong,” Chaudhri told Phys.org. “I believe we have now solved most of the main aspects of this area. However, new questions may emerge unexpectedly.” (Phys.org)—Researchers have finally answered a question that has stumped scientists since the early 1600s: Why are the heads of tadpole-shaped pieces of glass called “Prince Rupert’s drops” so strong?center_img The results showed that the heads of the drops have a much higher surface compressive stress than previously thought—up to 700 megapascals, which is nearly 7,000 times atmospheric pressure. This surface compressive layer is also thin, about 10% of the diameter of the head of a drop. In the 17th century, Prince Rupert from Germany brought some of these glass drops to England’s King Charles II, who was intrigued by their unusual properties. While the head of the drop is so strong that it can withstand the impact of a hammer, the tail is so fragile that bending it with your fingers will not only break the tail, but cause the entire droplet to instantly disintegrate into a fine powder. Prince Rupert’s drops are easily made by dropping red hot blobs of molten glass into water. Although researchers have tried to understand what causes the unusual properties of these drops for many years, it was not until recently that modern technology has allowed researchers to thoroughly investigate them.In 1994, S. Chandrasekar at Purdue University and M. M. Chaudhri at the University of Cambridge used high-speed framing photography to observe the drop-shattering process. From their experiments, they concluded that the surface of each drop experiences highly compressive stresses, while the interior experiences high tension forces. So the drop is in a state of unstable equilibrium, which can be easily disturbed by breaking the tail. One open question, however, is how the stresses are distributed throughout a Prince Rupert’s drop. Understanding the stress distribution would help to more fully explain why the heads of these drops are so strong. Explore further Prince Rupert’s drop. © 2017 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Algae growing on snow found to cause ice field to melt faster

first_imgCredit: CC0 Public Domain (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from several institutions in the U.S. has found that algae growing on packed snow causes the snow to melt faster. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the team describes testing the impact of algae growing on snow and measuring its impact on an Alaskan ice field. © 2017 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Cosmopolitan snow algae accelerate melting of Arctic glaciers As the planet continues to warm, scientists around the globe seek to learn about resulting changes. In this new effort, the researchers looked at the impact of algae growing on icefields in Alaska.Chlamydomonas nivalis is a type of fresh water algae that is hardy enough to survive while living on the snowflakes that make up ice fields in polar regions. Because of its pinkish hue, it causes what is commonly known as “watermelon snow.” Logic suggests that colored snow reflects less heat than white snow and that was what prompted the researchers to look into the impact that the algae is having on the ice fields.The study consisted of adding water to small designated areas and fertilizer to others on the Harding Icefield. The team also completely removed algae from some other areas to serve as a control. Doing so, the team reports, caused algae growth 1.5 times that of white snow in the watered areas and quadruple that in areas where fertilizer was added. The team then measured ice melt over a period of 100 days for all of the test areas.The researchers found that the places where algae were growing melted faster than did those with no algae, and the more algae was present, the faster the ice melted. By comparing their results with satellite imaging data, they were able to calculate the increase in melting across the entire ice field due to the presence of the algae—they found it to be 17 percent.But that was not the end of the story. The team also found that because the algae caused more melting, it meant there was more water for it to use, which increased its growth, causing even more melting. The presence of the algae created a feedback which, the team claims, is causing glacial ice to melt faster than it would otherwise. The researchers suggest the effect is likely occurring on glaciers in other places as well, including those in mountainous regions in non-polar areas.center_img Explore further Journal information: Nature Geoscience Citation: Algae growing on snow found to cause ice field to melt faster in Alaska (2017, September 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-09-algae-ice-field-faster-alaska.html More information: Gerard Q. Ganey et al. The role of microbes in snowmelt and radiative forcing on an Alaskan icefield, Nature Geoscience (2017). DOI: 10.1038/ngeo3027AbstractA lack of liquid water limits life on glaciers worldwide but specialized microbes still colonize these environments. These microbes reduce surface albedo, which, in turn, could lead to warming and enhanced glacier melt. Here we present results from a replicated, controlled field experiment to quantify the impact of microbes on snowmelt in red-snow communities. Addition of nitrogen–phosphorous–potassium fertilizer increased alga cell counts nearly fourfold, to levels similar to nitrogen–phosphorus-enriched lakes; water alone increased counts by half. The manipulated alga abundance explained a third of the observed variability in snowmelt. Using a normalized-difference spectral index we estimated alga abundance from satellite imagery and calculated microbial contribution to snowmelt on an icefield of 1,900 km2. The red-snow area extended over about 700 km2, and in this area we determined that microbial communities were responsible for 17% of the total snowmelt there. Our results support hypotheses that snow-dwelling microbes increase glacier melt directly in a bio-geophysical feedback by lowering albedo and indirectly by exposing low-albedo glacier ice. Radiative forcing due to perennial populations of microbes may match that of non-living particulates at high latitudes. Their contribution to climate warming is likely to grow with increased melt and nutrient input.last_img read more

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Recommended by divas

first_imgJust a day before I visited Spice Route, Kareena Kapoor had named it among her favourite restaurants in the Capital in her book The Style Diary of a Bollywood Diva. All the more reason why I was curious to check out this restaurant at The Imperial. While The Imperial is all about Victorian elegance, Spice Route is far removed from it. Instead, its polished wood, brass lamps and hand-painted murals remind you of an old temple somewhere in southeast Asia. The restaurant  is designed to reflect the journey of spices from the southern coast of India to the Far East. The first impression is breathtakingly beautiful.   Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The restaurant recently unveiled its winter menu which is a mix of Sri Lankan, Malaysian, Vietnamese and Thai food. The good thing is, even if you are not a spice lover like me, you can always have your dish custom-made. The menu doesn’t have too many options for that winter staple — soup. They have some Meen Rassam (mixed seafood rassam tempered with Kerala spices) and Tom Yum Thalay (spicy hot and sour mixed seafood soup). Prawns, lobsters, squid and fish dominate the menu (I am certain being a vegetarian, Kareena must have skipped the winter menu). Vegetarians please try out the regular menu because there is nothing for you here. If you are a seafood lover, you will relish it. The dishes are well cooked, service is prompt and the ambience makes for a nice meal. I sampled some  Isso Miris Temperadu which were fresh pranws, fried SRi Lankan style with paprika powder, tomato and Worcestershire sauce, some Meen Biryani (Kerala style rice cooked with squids and prawns) which was quite good with the right amount of spices. Paired perfectly with the watermelon juice I ordered. For deserts, there was  some yummy mango ice cream (not on the menu).  The perfect end!DETAILAt: The Spice Route, The Imperial, Janpath On Till: 31 January Timings: 12.30pm to 2.45 pm (lunch) & 7pm to 11.45 pm (dinner) Meal for Two: Rs 8,000 + taxes Phone: 23341234last_img read more

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Colour speak

first_imgThis one is for the Delhi art lovers. Gallery Artspeak has brought together a  group show of paintings, etchings, digital prints, mix media, drawings, sculptures and videos by artistes like  Ajay Kanhere, Akshay Rathore, Anpu Varkey, Baiju Parthan, Gigi Scaria, Hemant, Hemant Rao, Hemi Bawa, Kavita Singh Kale, Mousmi Biswas, Pratul Dash, Puja Kshatriya, Rajmahamad Pathan, Ritu Kapoor Kamath, Santosh Kale, Sandeep Biswas, Shivani Aggarwal, Shruti Gupta Chandra, Vidya Kamath and Yogesh Rawal. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’This current exhibition is a mini-version of the generic art fair aesthetics presenting a wide range of works of art created by both young and established artists who interestingly position themselves alternatively within the zones of alternative and mainstream practices. In contemporary times, due to the unpredictable movement of capital across borders, establishments, societies and individuals, as artists being partly the products of their milieu, it is very easy for them to move between the economic implications of aesthetics. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixToday within the given economic and socio-cultural and political realities, the mainstream artists tend to move towards alternative mediums and practices while the alternative ones move towards the mainstream aesthetics, if given a chance.While the alternative practices of the mainstreamers get a mainstream value easier, the mainstream practice of the alternative practitioners take more time to gain acceptance in the field of economic transactions. Tricky though it seems, the vigorous cross boundary aesthetic negotiations make this possible and in the long run both these practitioners gain visibility, appreciation and value by becoming a part and parcel of the established structure.Through various acts of co-optation alternative becomes mainstream and vice versa. In this sense, the current exhibition is a mini-version of the generic art fair aesthetics, in which varied expressions of conventionality and radicalism go hand in hand allowing the viewers to get inter-aesthetical and intra-aesthetical experiences.WHEN: On till 8 MarchWHERE: Artspeaks India Gallery, 5 Kehar Singh Estate, Lane No. 2, Western Marg, Said-ul-ajaib Near Garden of Five Senseslast_img read more

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ISKCON sets up immersive 360 degree full dome at Mayapur

first_imgKolkata: ISKCON has set up an immersive 360 degree full dome at Mayapur to preach the message of harmony and world peace.The hi-tech theatre was officially launched for public viewing on the auspicious occasion of Narsingha Chaturdashi on April 29.It may be recalled that during her visit to Mayapur in February, Chief Minister had assured the ISKCON authorities every cooperation in their attempt to declare Mayapur as a World Heritage Centre. Full dome refers to immersive dome based video projection environment where the viewer is surrounded by the video projection in a hemispherical angle view. The dome horizontal or tilted is filled with real time or pre-rendered computer animations, live captured images or composite environments. Even though astronomy is the most common topic, there are no content limitations and is used for hyper realistic presentations, explained Sridama Das, a native of New Zeland and the main mind behind setting up of the theatre. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flights”Top grade technology is used which is at par with the best theatres in the world to give a spiritually riveting audio-visual experience”, he added. The theatre has a capacity of 108 seats and is centrally air-conditioned. Currently two highly immersive films are running in Bengali and English in alternate shows. First film is named, The Churning, a unique look at the Samudra Manthan pastime (Lila) of Lord Vishnu using classic paintings from the books of His Divine Grace Swami Prabhupad, founder Acharya of ISKCON with additional immersive 3D graphics inside a 360 degree setting. Second film is 9 steps to eternity, which explores Nabadwip and the 9 forms of devotional service to please Lord Krishna.Every year Mayapur, is being visited by more than 6 million devotees, pilgrims and tourists from different parts of the world.Full Dome films on esoteric subjects like Bhagavad Gita, Srimad Bhagvatam, Chaitanya Charitamrita and other Vedic literature in an enlivening manner.last_img read more

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Passion for job can be cultivated too

first_imgIf you are not happy with what you are doing for a living, do not be quick to give up as researchers say passion too can be cultivated and you may well enjoy the very job you earlier disliked.The findings offer assurance to those who have not — or have yet — to find what they are passionate about: If you can not discover your passion, you can learn to develop it.“We can choose to change our beliefs or strategies to cultivate passion gradually or seek compatibility from the outset, and be just as effective in the long run at achieving this coveted experience,” said the study’s lead author Patricia Chen, doctoral psychology student at University of Michigan in the US. The dominant mentality is the belief that passion is attained through finding a fit with the right line of work, or “following one’s passion”. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’An alternative mindset is that passion can be cultivated over time as one gains competence in a line of work. Researchers examined people’s expectations, choices and outcomes associated with each of these two mindsets — termed as the “fit theory” and “develop theory”.They found that both mentalities are similarly effective at achieving vocational wellbeing. People with the fit theory tend to select vocations that they enjoy from the outset —an indication of compatibility that is important to them. In contrast, people with the develop theory focus on cultivating passion and fit over time. “Thus, they are more likely to prioritise vocational characteristics other than immediate enjoyment, such as pay,” Chen said. The findings suggest contrary to popular wisdom, a love-at first-sight experience is not necessary when evaluating a potential job. The findings appeared in the journal Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.last_img read more

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