Bravo still committed to play for WI

first_imgMELBOURNE, Australia (CMC):All-rounder Dwayne Bravo says he is still committed to playing for the West Indies, but was forced to quit Test cricket because of the poor treatment meted out to him by selectors.Speaking ahead of his campaign in the Big Bash League for Melbourne Renegades, Bravo told media here that with little interest coming from selectors, he had turned his attention to the lucrative Twenty20 leagues across the globe.”Until earlier this year, I was still interested to play Test cricket, but I have yet to hear anything from any selector, what their plans are for me, what my position is,” Bravo lamented.”I just decided it’s time to move on with my life and try to channel my energy in different places. I would have loved the opportunity to play Test cricket again, but since being dropped back in 2010, I never got the chance and I just decided to call it a day.”He continued: “I’m not shutting down my opportunities to represent the West Indies. I still, 100 per cent, want to play for the West Indies in one-day internationals and T20s.”The 32-year-old played the last of his 40 Tests five years ago after scoring 2,200 runs at an average of 31 and taking 86 wickets at an average of nearly 40. Following this protracted absence from the side, Bravo announced his retirement from the longer format in January this year.Ousted as captainHe was appointed one-day captain in 2013, but axed a year and a half later after he helped lead the players’ fight against the West Indies Cricket Board and the West Indies Players’ Association, which resulted in the controversial abandoned tour of India.Bravo said many West Indies players felt more respected outside of the Caribbean and this was behind their decision to ply their trade in tournaments like the Big Bash.”I get frustrated at times, not only for myself, but for all the other cricketers – Chris Gayle, Darren Sammy, Kieron Pollard, Andre Russell. We all want to represent West Indies,” Bravo said.”But, sometimes, the way we have been treated over the years … why should we actually fight with West Indies’ cricket when the rest of the world opens their arms for us?”Yes, they pay us well, but at the same time, we never feel disrespect in any way when we play for those teams around the world. We feel loved. We feel well-respected. Do we get that type of treatment back in the region? No, we don’t.”With the ICC T20 World Cup slated to bowl off in March next year, Bravo said he was taking nothing for granted about his selection.”I would love to think that I would be good enough and have done enough to get selected for the T20 World Cup, but I’m not saying anything. I don’t know,” he mused.last_img read more

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St Thomas top junior boxing champs

first_imgSt Thomas Boxing Club retained their hold on the Jamaica Boxing Board’s Youth and Junior Championships, when they came out ahead of five other gyms at the Stanley Couch Gym last Saturday night, with 12 points. Stanley Couch placed second with seven points, Savanna-la-mar had four points, Bruising Gym and Trench Town scored three each, Sugar Olympic picked up two points and Seaview Gym one point. The championship featured Junior boxers aged 14-15 and Youth Boxers 16 and 17 years. In the junior category, there was a lot of action and the St Thomas team, which is coached by AIBA 1-Star Judge Robert Napier, excelled. Lightweight Anthony Burke was their best boxer and in his bout against Shaquer Dobson from Sugar Olympic, he was dominant and won by TKO after only one minute and 56 seconds of the first round. He was voted the most outstanding junior boxer for this performance. His teammate, Reynaldo Roberts, also had a TKO victory over another boxer from Sugar Olympic Gym, Malachi Baker. The Youth division saw two excellent bouts. Menilik Russell from the Savanna-la-mar Gym won on points over Joshua Forrest Davidson from Seaview Gym, while Shavon Lindo from Bruising Gym, who is a technically sound boxer with a lot of promise, defeated Devenney Patterson from St Thomas on points. Russell was named the outstanding Youth Boxer. In other bouts, Joseph Russell defeated Michael McDonald on points. Shadine Nash defeated Kirkland Clarke on points, Javon Goldson scored a second round TKO victory over Rahmong Chung and Brandon Gordon from St Thomas scored a surprise victory over Daniel Hylton from Stanley Couch, who recently won a silver medal at a development tournament in Guyana.last_img read more

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Dr Paul Wright: Drug-free sport is attainable

first_img Icons protected It appears that anti-doping organisations around the world have very little interest in finding and announcing positive drug test results for the so-called icons of sports. We now know that credentials and expertise in anti-doping could also mean very little when a nation’s credibility is at stake. Lord Coe lamented publicly his disappointment at the absence of Russia from the World Indoor Championships, as he simultaneously held out hope that Russia could still send athletes to the Rio Olympics. Kenya had dates for compliance with World Anti-Doping Association (WADA) directives repeatedly postponed seemingly in a desperate effort to have them compete in Rio. The announcement that Ethiopia, Morocco, Ukraine, and Belarus are all on a list of countries not fully compliant with WADA’s anti-doping code was quickly followed by assurances that these countries were not banned from competing in the Olympics. The obvious question is: ‘What on earth is going on?’ The call from British athlete, Paula Radcliffe, for drug testers to be allowed visa-free entry to countries where independent testing is scheduled (as the issuance of a visa will alert cheaters that the tester is coming) has not received any support from the authorities, including the new head of the medical and anti-doping commission of the IAAF, South African Harold Adams, who replaced Gabriel Dolle, who is now banned for bribing athletes to conceal positive results. The answer to clean sports will only be achieved when those previously present when corruption was rife are removed and the selection of their replacements be removed from government appointees. Drug-free sport is attainable. All that is needed is the will to make sports drug-free. UKAD being investigated We now hear that this same group is being investigated by a former assistant police chief constable in Britain, Mr Andy Ward. This investigation became necessary as a British newspaper, the Sunday Times, published a report that alleges that a British doctor, Mark Bonar, had claimed that he provided numerous athletes, including Premier League footballers, England cricketers and Tour de France cyclists with banned substances such as EPO growth hormones and steroids. Amazingly, the report also indicates that UKAD was given information about the activities some two years ago by an athlete who was trying to reduce possible sanction after failing to submit to a drug test when called upon to do so. This whistle-blower even provided signed prescriptions for banned substances signed by the doctor, but alleges that UKAD refused to probe further, claiming that the accused physician was not associated with any organised sport. Yes, UKAD, the same organisation selected to lead the fight against doping in sports leading up to the Summer Olympics this year! Athletics remains the number one watched sport in the Olympics. This fact will be questioned as the fans of the sport watch the build-up to the Summer Olympics in Rio, Brazil this year. Doping scandal after doping scandal has left some of the fans wondering ‘just who is clean’. The International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) has announced that the Swedish runner, Abeba Aregawi, has tested positive for the performance-enhancing substance meldonium and is provisionally banned from competition. Aregawi was the Ethiopia World indoor 1500-metre champion who switched allegiance to Sweden after the 2012 Olympics. Her ‘excuse’ for the positive test is that she was given tablets by a doctor in Ethiopia that she thought was vitamins! Thanks to whistle-blowers, we now know that doctors, coaches, drug testers and even those in charge of Anti-Doping Commissions have aided and abetted cheating in the sport of athletics. The present head of the IAAF, Lord Sebastian Coe, is facing mounting criticism as he tries to clean up a sport that now seems destined for life support as major sponsors withdraw their support. The United Kingdom Anti-Doping organisation (UKAD) was recently named as the body to oversee the anti-doping programme in Russia, and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) appointed UKAD as the secretariat for the task force that will coordinate the fight against doping in the build-up to this summer’s Olympics.last_img read more

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