A new face at the Vatican

first_imgAfter a telltale release of white smoke and an hour of suspenseful fanfare, Vatican leaders on Wednesday announced the new head of the Roman Catholic Church: Jorge Mario Bergoglio, an Argentinian cardinal.The selection marks a shift for the 2,000-year-old institution. Bergoglio, 76, will become the first non-European pontiff and the first leader from the Jesuit order, known for its intellectual tradition and care for the poor. Bergoglio will be known as Pope Francis, named after the modest friar who also tended the poor and worked to re-instill energy into the church. The new pontiff succeeds Benedict XVI, who also made history, in his case by becoming the first pope in nearly 600 years to resign.Gazette reporters Katie Koch and Colleen Walsh spoke to Harvard professors familiar with the Vatican and its workings to gauge their thoughts on the 266th pope.J. Bryan Hehir is the Parker Gilbert Montgomery Professor of the Practice of Religion and Public Life at Harvard Kennedy School. A diocesan priest, Hehir is secretary for health care and social services in the Archdiocese of Boston.GAZETTE: Were you surprised by the choice of Cardinal Bergoglio?HEHIR: Some reports from the conclave that elected Benedict XVI [in 2005] — reports that you can’t verify — said at the time that Bergoglio was No. 2 in the voting, and certainly he was talked about as a possible candidate for the papacy at that time. He hadn’t been talked about a great deal in things that I’ve read leading up to this conclave. In that sense, it was a bit surprising.It’s surprising and, I think, a wonderful thing that a Jesuit, a member of the Society of Jesus, was named to the papacy. The Society of Jesus has always had a special tie to the papacy. Members of their order take a vow as part of their training to be at the disposal of the papacy. This is a very interesting appointment, the first Jesuit. Even though I can’t say I know a great deal about him, what I have heard consistently is that he has been a voice for and a support of the poor in his country, which has gone through very difficult economic times.GAZETTE: Francis will also be the first pope of the modern era who is not from Europe. Do you think that choice was deliberate?HEHIR: Geography was not the determining factor, for sure, but I think geography was on the minds of many people leading up to this election, including the electors. Simply the fact of Latin America having roughly 265 million Catholics — that’s an important thing to take into consideration. It can’t be the only factor, but having made the choice of a Latin American, I think that will speak loudly not only to Catholics and others in Latin America, but to the Southern Hemisphere generally as a recognition of their great significance in the life of Catholicism today.GAZETTE: The Southern Hemisphere, as you alluded to, is where the majority of the world’s poor currently live. Do you think this signals a new direction for the church in reconnecting with its social justice roots?HEHIR: I think there will be a strong stress on social justice because of his own history, on the one hand, and secondly because social justice has been a major, major theme of the church in Latin America since the Second Vatican Council [in the early 1960s]. Thirdly, the Jesuits in Latin America have been a leading voice about the pursuit of justice and concern for the poor. The Jesuits in Central America, for example, have been leaders in a very conflicted period of time, and that has led to martyrdom for some of them.GAZETTE: We’re once again seeing a pope enter the papacy at an advanced age — a factor that led to Benedict stepping down last month, and that could produce another relatively brief tenure for the new pope. Do you think continuity of leadership is something the church needs to consider at this point?HEHIR: There will be substantial continuity because the basic elements of the church will not change. The basic teachings will not change. The basic law of the church will not change. You can presume continuity in a Catholic context. Even if you look at a man like John XXIII, who brought about such huge changes in the church [during the Second Vatican Council], those changes … took place within a wider framework of stability in the church.But the question of what kind of change he will bring will depend upon his own intellectual convictions, his personal style, and his own assessment of what dimensions of the tradition can and should change, while at the same time making those changes within the wider context of the Christian Catholic faith.Francis Schüssler Fiorenza is the Charles Chauncey Stillman Professor of Roman Catholic Theological Studies at Harvard Divinity School.GAZETTE: What is the significance of choosing Francis to honor St. Francis of Assisi?FIORENZA: Francis [founder of the Franciscans, in 1209] gave up wealth that he had and he sort of incarnated — I don’t want to say anti-institutional — but an un-institutional incorporation of Christianity, being concerned with the poor, being concerned with others … and so the [name] Francis was always known for that. You know how some people admire Sean O’Malley because he’s a Franciscan and walks around in sandals, and then gave up the mansion and lives in an apartment? Well, the new pope did actually the same. He gave up the mansion in Argentina … he would take the buses to travel places, so I think it’s that kind of personal spirituality of a Franciscan that he is symbolizing by the name, even though he himself is a Jesuit. That’s what I think is important.GAZETTE: What is the significance of the new pope being the first from South America?FIORENZA: It’s really showing how the axis of Christianity is shifting from Europe to the Third World, and that the numbers of Christians are the most numerous in Spanish-speaking, Portuguese-speaking countries, so it’s a time of symbolizing the importance of that for the church. And you might say it might be an attempt to appeal to native Latin Americans. If one of yours is now the pope … [now they can] identify their ethnic and geographical background with the center of the church in Rome.GAZETTE: Does his record while he served in Argentina indicate whether or not he will support a more conservative agenda as pope?FIORENZA: He took, what I would call, some more conservative positions [while in Argentina]. There has been some criticism about whether he was forceful enough against the military dictatorship. Those criticisms have been raised. He is orthodox in regards to the social issues … [With] this conservative streak, as well as this more evangelical, in a positive sense … spirituality, he maybe appeals both to conservatives and he appeals to liberals. That’s why he got the most votes next to Ratzinger [at the last conclave]. So I don’t want to make as much of a statement of where he’ll be — I think we’re not sure — but I think that explains there is something in him that diverse groups of people can identify with.last_img read more

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Chasing Sound From the Studio to Your Home

first_imgWhat’s on your playlist this week? A little Panic! At the Disco? John Hiatt? Queen Latifah? No Doubt? Or maybe some classics like Toto? Smokey Robinson? Bette Midler? Eric Clapton? Even Debby Boone?That’s a wide variety of musical styles, but they all have something in common. Their sound has been impacted by audio engineer and record producer Jack Joseph Puig. And so has the Dell XPS 27 All-in-One (AIO).Designed in the Studio“As a professional record maker, I chase sound every day. I chase emotion every day with the artists inside the recording studios,” Puig says. “Now I’m chasing sound and emotion and feeling with engineers.”Those engineers include James Haller, principal experience designer at Dell. In this video, Haller, Puig and Dell’s Donnie Oliphant share the story of how we looked to push technology to its limits and do something really disruptive when designing the XPS 27 AIO:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wcDV51am54Q&t=2s“I actually went through 72 iterations of pushing, rejecting, redesigning. Everything you can imagine we tried,” says Puig. “We tried different speaker configurations. We tried different kinds of amplifiers, different kinds of voltages, before we found something that made me feel that the sound I chase every day was coming out of those speakers.”An Audiophile’s ComputerIt’s a sound that reviewers have noticed – and not just the usual tech-focused publications that typically review computers.“We’ve never given a computer one of our Exceptional Value Awards, but the Dell XPS 27 makes so much more sheer sense than an iMac, I’m compelled,” Jeff Dorgay wrote in a TONEAudio magazine feature titled “The World’s First Audiophile Computer.”“Using this machine is pure joy. When was the last time you said that about a computer?” Dorgay said.“Using this machine is pure joy. When was the last time you said that about a computer?ShareVR-Ready SoundReviewers continued to laud the XPS 27 when we announced at Computex 2017 a virtual reality (VR)-ready version of the system.Anton Shilov noted “the key feature of the latest XPS 27 remained intact: the audio sub-system with 10 speakers (six on the front, two down firing and two radiating) designed to enable surround sound without using bulky external audio equipment.”But select configurations now also meet the recommended specifications to power an ideal VR experience with either the HTC Vive or Oculus Rift headsets.Bring It All HomeRemoving barriers between the listener and their music is great not only for professionals like Puig, but for all of us music lovers out there. When we crank up the tunes, we not only hear the music, but also feel it and that combination can really make an impact.“Being able to get some sort of emotional response from the customer from an audio perspective that was something that hadn’t been done before in the industry,” said Oliphant, director of XPS Product Marketing.So if you’d like to add an all-in-one system to your home that can not only make you more productive, but also take your gaming to a new level AND transport you musically, then you really ought to check out the XPS 27 AIO.last_img read more

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Senate discusses updated ticket plans, sustainability

first_imgStudent Senate met Wednesday night to hear presentations on the new men’s basketball and hockey student ticket plan, local and sustainable food initiatives and student government’s report to the board of trustees. Senate was closed to the public when student body president Bryan Ricketts, student body vice president Nidia Ruelas and chief of staff Dan Sehlhorst presented the student government sexual violence report, which will be delivered to the board of trustees Oct. 15. Brian Pracht, assistant athletic director, gave the first presentation on the new ticket plan for men’s basketball and hockey. “We’re not selling a season pass anymore — it’s going to be complimentary tickets,” he said. “But there’s going to be a three-day window for you to claim these tickets online.”Pracht said there will be no advantage to waking up early on the first day to claim tickets because students who go to more games will be given preference for ones that are expected to draw a large crowd.“We will weight it so that the more games you go to, the better opportunity you will have to attend the big games,” he said. “So if you go to every game prior to the North Carolina game, you will get a ticket to North Carolina. If you go to two games before North Carolina, I don’t know. You’ll have to play the odds. We’re definitely going to reward students.” Students will still be able to buy tickets at a walk-up price before the game if space is available, Pracht said. “We knew we needed to do something different,” he said. “We were selling 1,500 to 2,000 student season passes a year and the show rate for students with those passes was 30 percent. So not very good.”More information can be found at und.com/student-tickets.Sophomore Carolyn Yvellez, a staff member at the department of social concerns and a Notre Dame Food Services (NDFS) intern, gave a presentation about increasing the amount of local and sustainable food on campus. “Food Services started the project of defining what local food is,” she said. “We’ve defined “local” as 250 miles from campus. We currently spend about $3.5 million supporting local farms and 38 percent of the dining hall food is from local sources.”Yvellez said that in a survey, students said they were more concerned about having healthy options than they were about having local options. “The current industrial model is not a sustainable model for providing food,” she said. “[There are] debates about how much it’s threatening public health through creating antibiotic resistant bacteria, pesticides and disease. In general, local farms have a lower risk for these issues.”After filling out a survey, the senators discussed problems surrounding local food sources and sustainability efforts on campus and potential changes, including eliminating trays and changing food options in LaFortune Student Center. “With people already so upset about the styrofoam cups leaving the dining halls, there would be a riot if the trays disappeared,” Amy Smikle, Howard Hall senator, said. “I’m getting so much negative feedback and comments about the styrofoam cups disappearing, the trays disappearing isn’t going to go well. How do we tell them it’s better for the environment when they don’t even care about the styrofoam cups?”Yvellez also said NDFS is looking for replacements for the Burger King in LaFortune and that a more local and sustainable replacement is under consideration. Tags: basketball, department of social concerns, Food Services, Hockey, Student government, student senate, sustainabilitylast_img read more

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Falconer Fire Department Challenges Community To “Chalk Your Walk”

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Image via The Falconer Fire Department / Facebook. Image via The Falconer Fire Department / Facebook.FALCONER – Fire Department officials in the Village of Falconer are challenging the community to “Chalk Your Walk” in an effort to brighten spirits during the COVID-19 pandemic.In a post on Facebook, the Falconer Fire Department asked community members to draw a picture, a message, a game or just simply color their sidewalk or driveway.Then, the department asks community members to send them photos on Facebook.Image via The Falconer Fire Department / Facebook.last_img

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Michael Lomenda to Temporarily Replace Matt Bogart in Jersey Boys

first_img Related Shows It’s too good to be true for Michael Lomenda, who will step in for Matt Bogart as Nick Massi in Jersey Boys from May 3 through September 4. Bogart is on leave from the long-running tuner while he appears in off-Broadway’s Himself and Nora, and will return to the Main Stem’s August Wilson Theatre on September 6.A Jersey Boys vet, having appeared as Nick Massi in Toronto, on the road and on Broadway, Lomenda played the role in Clint Eastwood’s feature film adaptation of the musical.Jersey Boys tells the story of how Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons went from being unknown New Jersey kids to international pop superstars. The show features over 30 hit songs, including “Sherry,” “Big Girls Don’t Cry” and “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You.”The production currently additionally stars Joseph Leo Bwarie as Frankie Valli, Richard H. Blake as Tommy DeVito and Quinn VanAntwerp as Bob Gaudio. View Comments from $59.00center_img Jersey Boys Michael Lomenda(Photo: David Leyes)last_img read more

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Leslie Odom Jr. & Hamilton Castmates Sing Out in 360 Video

first_img The Tony Awards are just days away, but until then, we’ll all have to wait for it (wait for it). Fortunately, you can wait for it (wait for it) while watching this 360-degree video from CBS of the cast of Hamilton singing “Wait For It” (wait for it) on the Richard Rodgers Theatre stage. Take in Leslie Odom Jr. and his castmates from all angles as they bring powerhouse vocals to the a cappella rendition. Keep an eye upstage for some particularly expressive conducting from Alex Lacamoire. Catch them and more of Broadway’s best perform at the Tonys on June 12. Related Shows View Comments from $149.00center_img Hamilton Leslie Odom Jr. and the cast of ‘Hamilton’last_img read more

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High school researchers

first_imgBy Merritt MelanconUniversity of GeorgiaFor six weeks this summer, 23 high school students in Athens, Ga., and 18 in Griffin, Ga., researched everything from termites to aflatoxin to stem cells in University of Georgia labs.The students are part of the University of Georgia’s Young Scholars Program. Many children dream of being astronauts or doctors but become alienated from math and science as they go through school.Since 1989, the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences has used its Young Scholars Program to show kids the connections between science and their daily lives and career choices.Six-week apprenticeshipsThe six-week, research-based program pairs high school students with scientists on the CAES Athens and Griffin campuses. The scientists develop research projects for the students to complete in the six weeks.Don McLellan, CAES director of diversity relations, said the goal of the program is to give young scholars career and education options they might not have come across before.The program was designed to recruit minority and under-represented students to the CAES. But any promising students can participate.”We’re just trying to put UGA and the college on their radar screens,” McLellan said. “A lot of these kids have never thought of coming to UGA, much less going into a career in agriculture or the sciences.A way of mentoringIt’s a way of mentoring, he said. It lets them get to know the scientists and what they do. They learn, too, what degrees they need to do what they do. And they learn how to start preparing to get to a university.The work they’re doing is real research, McLellan said. The mentors value the help they get, and the students value the research experience and the math and lab skills they pick.Pat Clifton oversees the YSP. The keys to its success, she says, are the relationships between the mentors and their students.”The mentors are really the heart of the program,” Clifton said. “The university is fortunate to have research scientists who give their time to mentoring promising high school students.” Marilyn Johnson coordinates the program at the Griffin campus. She says it not only opens students’ eyes to new career paths, but also helps broaden their world views.International travelThis year, selected students traveled to Africa and Central America.”We have such a narrow box we live in here in the United States,” Johnson said. “When you spend time in Ghana and Costa Rica, it’s easy to see how what you do back home affects the bigger picture. It helps you see the impact your research could have and hopefully helps the kids find out what they were put on earth to do.”In the future, McLellan would like to double the number of students and mentors on the Athens and Griffin campuses and extend the program to the UGA campus in Tifton. Eventually, he wants to see a residential component, so students from all over the state can take part.”We need to push the limits of this program and reach out to communities all over the state,” he said. “We can’t afford to leave anyone on the sidelines if we want to find ways to grow our food and protect the environment in the future.”last_img read more

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Airport screening ineffective against COVID-19: US health agency

first_imgThe US began screening passengers arriving from China on February 3, interviewing them about possible symptoms and using thermal scanners to take their temperatures, with the policy later widened to include Iran.Since the bulk of early cases in the US came from the West Coast, the CDC’s report focused on screening efforts in California.Officials screened about 12,000 passengers between February 3 and March 17, giving them instructions on self monitoring. But only three of these passengers were later found to match with the 26,182 patients with COVID-19 reported to California by April 15. Airport passenger screening for coronavirus during the early stages of the pandemic was futile because people can transmit the virus without showing symptoms, the United States’ top health agency said Monday.The analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was published days after a news report that the White House is pushing to return to the strategy as it seeks to re-open the hard-hit airline industry.Internal emails obtained by USA TODAY on Saturday showed CDC officials urging President Donald Trump’s administration to reconsider the plan for fever checks as a means to restore confidence. This suggests the efforts, despite requiring 1,694 person-hours of work, were a near-complete failure.”The benefits of screening for case detection at the airport might be limited for a respiratory disease with the potential for presymptomatic and asymptomatic transmission, such as COVID-19,” the reports’ authors wrote.By contrast, airport screening for Ebola during the 2014-15 outbreak was more effective because the disease “has obvious clinical manifestations, is contagious only after symptom onset, and a smaller number of travelers required monitoring,” the report added.According to the USA TODAY report, the White House is seeking to revive the policy of checking travelers for fever at 20 US airports.Trump’s chief of staff Mark Meadows said the effort would be visible and instill confidence in travelers, according to meeting notes cited by the newspaper.But Martin  Cetron, the CDC’s director of global mitigation and quarantine, pushed back, the newspaper said.”Thermal scanning as proposed is a poorly designed control and detection strategy as we have learned very clearly,” he wrote in an email to Department of Homeland Security officials.”We should be concentrating our CDC resources where there is impact and a probability of mission success.”The mooted plan would see passengers with fever referred to the CDC, with Cetron questioning the agency’s authority to execute this plan.He ended his email: “Please kindly strike out CDC from this role.”center_img Topics :last_img read more

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First Arab space mission to Mars launches from Japan

first_imgThe first Arab space mission to Mars blasted off Monday aboard a rocket from Japan, after weather delays set back the launch of the probe dubbed “Hope.”A live feed of the launch showed the rocket carrying the unmanned probe, known as “Al-Amal” in Arabic, lifting off from the Tanegashima Space Centre in southern Japan.”We have launched the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 42 (H-IIA F42) carrying aboard the Emirates Mars Mission’s (EMM) HOPE spacecraft… at 6:58:14 (JST) (2158GMT),” rocket manufacturer Mitsubishi Heavy Industries said in a statement shortly after the launch. Five minutes after launch, the rocket carrying the probe was on course, carrying out the first separation of its flight.The Emirati project is one of three racing to Mars, including Tianwen-1 from China and Mars 2020 from the United States, taking advantage of a  period when the Earth and Mars are nearest.In October, Mars will be a comparatively short 38.6 million miles (62.07 million kilometers) from Earth, according to NASA.”Hope” is expected to reach Mars’s orbit by February 2021, marking the 50th anniversary of the unification of the UAE, an alliance of seven emirates. ‘Holistic view’ Several dozen probes — most of them American — have set off for the Red Planet since the 1960s. Many never made it that far, or failed to land.The drive to explore Mars flagged until the confirmation less than 10 years ago that water once flowed on its surface.Omran Sharaf, the mission’s project manager, has said the “Hope” probe will offer a special perspective on the elusive “Red Planet.””What is unique about this mission is that for the first time the scientific community around the world will have an holistic view of the Martian atmosphere at different times of the day at different seasons,” Sharaf told a pre-launch briefing.”We have a strategy to contribute to the global effort in developing technologies and science work that will help one day if humanity decides to put a human on Mars.”The UAE already has nine functioning satellites in orbit, with plans to launch another eight in coming years. And in September, it sent the first Emirati into space on a mission to the International Space Station.But the UAE’s ambitions go well beyond that, with a goal of building a human settlement on Mars by 2117. Topics : Martian year of orbitUnlike the two other Mars ventures scheduled for this year, it will not land on the Red Planet, but instead orbit it for a whole Martian year, or 687 days.While the objective of the Mars mission is to provide a comprehensive image of the weather dynamics in the Red Planet’s atmosphere, the probe is a foundation for a much bigger goal — building a human settlement on Mars within the next 100 years.The UAE also wants the project to serve as a source of inspiration for Arab youth, in a region too often wracked by sectarian conflicts and economic crises.The “Hope” probe is expected to detach from the launch rocket about an hour after blast-off.That’s when the real excitement will begin, UAE Mars mission’s deputy project manager Sarah al-Amiri told AFP before the launch.”In my heart of hearts, I’m looking forward to the initial 24 hours after separation, and that’s where we see the results of our work,” said Amiri, who is also Minister of State for Advanced Sciences.”It is when we first get the signal, when we know that every part of the spacecraft is functioning, when the solar panels are deployed, when we hit our trajectory and are headed towards Mars,” she told AFP earlier this month.last_img read more

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Unisex toilets in schools leaving female students too afraid to use loo

first_imgNZ Herald 18 February 2019Family First Comment: No surprise.“According to Women’s Voices Wales, some girls are refraining from using the toilet during school hours because of a lack of privacy and taunts from boys including “period shaming”… some girls stop drinking water during the day to avoid going to the bathroom and some students have complained of sexual harassment and a lack of privacy.”And it’s a problem in NZ also! www.askmefirst.nzSchoolgirls are too afraid to use unisex toilets at school over fears from boys and sexual harassment, campaigners warn.In the UK a growing number of schools are ditching separate sex toilets over claims they are not inclusive to transgender children.Schools say they are implementing unisex toilets as a way to stop bullying and help all genders feel safe.However, according to Women’s Voices Wales, some girls are refraining from using the toilet during school hours because of a lack of privacy and taunts from boys including “period shaming”.According to the campaigners, some girls stop drinking water during the day to avoid going to the bathroom and some students have complained of sexual harassment and a lack of privacy.One parent of a secondary school girl told the Daily Express: “She won’t use the toilets and tries to last all day. Boys are always speculating on whether girls are having their periods according to how long they take in the toilet.”The mother claims when she spoke to the headmaster she was told her daughter should go to the nurse’s office if she has any issues.READ MORE: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=12204733Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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