Aqueous and Mungion Rage NYC With Post-Phish Throwdown [Gallery/Videos]

first_imgLoad remaining images Here’s a video of Aqueous covering “Fame” by David Bowie in the deep hours of the night:Check out the gallery below, courtesy of Jeremy Scott Photography. Last night after the Phish show let out of Madison Square Garden, fans headed over to DROM for some late-night action. Aqueous and Mungion made up the incredible double-bill, blasting fans with pure rock and roll to the umpteenth degree. The first of many after-parties packed the room with high energy, taking in deep breaths of excitement and letting out sighs of gratitude for both up-and-coming bands.Mungion kicked the late-night off properly, blending elements of Rock, Jazz, Latin, Metal, Bluegrass, Jam, Electronic, Classical, World Music, and Funk, to create a sound that is truly their own. Afterwards came Aqueous, who muscled their innate ability for both composition and improvisation by balancing their impressive songwriting with their natural tendencies to jam. Craig Brodhead from Turkuaz even joined in for their original tune “Origami”.Here’s a clip of Mungion closing out their incredible set, before Aqueous took the stage:last_img read more

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Ringo Starr’s New Album Features Paul McCartney, Peter Frampton, Edgar Winter, And More [Single]

first_imgThe album will also be paired with four bonus tracks: The recently recovered original recording of Starr’s “Back Off Boogaloo” that the drummer found while moving houses, plus re-recorded takes on three Starr hits featuring Alberta Cross and Vandaveer.You can listen to the title single from the album below via Spotify. Give Me More Love will be released on September 10th, and Ringo Starr will be hitting the road with His All-Starr Band this fall in support of the album. For a full list of upcoming dates, head to Ringo’s website. At the end of last week, Beatles drummer Ringo Starr announced the upcoming release of his 19th solo studio album, Give More Love, Starr’s first since Postcards From Paradise in 2015. The album includes a host of well-known guest collaborators, including Joe Walsh, Peter Frampton (“Laughable”), Richard Marx (“Speed of Sound”), Glen Ballard (“Electricity”), Dave Stewart, Don Was and Timothy B. Schmit.But easily the most exciting collaboration on the list is the only other living Beatle–Sir Paul McCartney himself. Starr hinted at the duo working together earlier this year, when he tweeted a picture of the two in the studio. Now, it has been confirmed that McCartney is featured on the new track “Show Me The Way,” which also features studio work from Walsh, who is Starr’s brother-in-law. This marks the first collab between McCartney and Starr since Ringo’s 2010 record Y Not.last_img read more

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The New Grateful Dead Musical, ‘Red Roses, Green Gold’, Is Opening In October!

first_imgA few months ago, Broadway World announced that a new musical featuring the music of the Grateful Dead was in the works. At the time, the new project was described as “a new musical comedy, featuring the music of THE GRATEFUL DEAD- a semi-fantastical and immersive Americana tale of the Jones family in 1920’s Cumberland, Maryland, as they con, swindle and gamble their way into riches.” During the initial announcement of the project, most of the information about this new Grateful Dead musical was gleaned from the show’s casting call, which confirmed that Dead & Company’s Jeff Chimenti would serve as musical director and Rachel Klein as director.Jackie Greene To Lead Members Of Dead & Co, moe., Twiddle In Charity Grateful Dead TributeYesterday, Rolling Stone shed more light on the project, noting that the new musical will be called Red Roses, Green Gold and that it will open at New York City’s Minetta Lane Theatre in the fall, with previews starting October 11th and the show opening to the public on October 29th. Rolling Stone‘s preview also notes that director Rachel Klein will serve as the choreographer for the project and that Michael Norman Mann wrote the show’s script. Mann is no stranger to Grateful Dead musicals, as the writer has previously penned two projects featuring the Grateful Dead’s music—Cumberland Blues in the late 90’s and Shakedown Street, which opened in 2005.Ahead of Red Roses, Green Gold‘s opening, you can check out the former Equity casting notice for the show, which sheds a little more insight into what to expect from the Grateful Dead musical. Among the list of characters, we have Jack, the cunning family patriarch; Melinda, the beautiful and independent daughter described as “a total lady boss”; Mick (a.k.a. “The Candy Man”), the charismatic and sexy trickster; Jessup, the villainous wealthy mining tycoon; and Dudley, the “lovable, slow-witted son” of the villian, Jessup. Being a Grateful Dead musical, no cast would be complete without a Bertha, who is described as a “firecracker.” And, being a musical in general, no such casting would be complete without a mysterious out-of-towner who rolls through and must win the love of a lady “despite having some secrets.”Watch Full Video Of The Grateful Dead’s Final Performance At Alpine ValleyTickets for Red Roses, Green Gold go on sale starting September 25th at 10 am (EST), though a pre-sale for American Express cardholders will run from September 13th at 10 am through September 20th at 9:59 am and an Audience Rewards pre-sale will run from September 20th at 10 am to September 25th at 9:59 am (EST). Prices for this Grateful Dead-inspired Broadway show will range from $58 to $88 dollars, though premium tickets will be available for $125 dollars.[H/T Rolling Stone]last_img read more

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Pink Talking Fish Honors Tom Petty During 3-Night Run With Special Encore Tune Each Night

first_img[Video: TheKamherst]“Mary Jane’s Last Dance” [Video: nognuisagoodgnu][Photo: Sarah Bourque] Over the weekend, Pink Talking Fish performed a three-night run across the Northeast, with dates at Buffalo, NY’s Buffalo Iron Works on Thursday, October 6th; Rochester, NY’s Funk ‘n Waffles on Friday, October 7th; and Toronto, ON’s The Mod Club on Saturday, October 8th. During these shows, the beloved Pink Floyd, Talking Heads, and Phish tribute group laid out three of their characteristically high-octane shows. However, as a means to pay tribute to the late Tom Petty, the iconic rock star who passed away last Monday, each night, the group encored with a classic Petty tune. In Buffalo, the group ended their Thursday show with a heartfelt rendition of “Free Fallin’”. The next night, the group encored with “You Wreck Me” in Rochester. Closing out their three-night run, Pink Talking Fish ended the final of their three shows with a fiery performance of “Mary Jane’s Last Dance.”How Tom Petty’s “Free Fallin’” Went From A Studio Joke To A Worldwide Smash HitYou can watch Pink Talking Fish’s Thursday and Saturday tributes to Tom Petty below.“Free Fallin’”last_img read more

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Radiohead Releases ‘A Moon Shaped Pool’ B-Side “Ill Wind” On Streaming Services [Listen]

first_imgToday, Radiohead has released a bonus track from their most recent studio album, 2016’s A Moon Shaped Pool, on streaming services for the first time ever. “Ill Wind”, a characteristically eerie Radiohead number, was previously available as a CD single (along with rejected would-be James Bond theme song, “Spectre”) as part of the A Moon Shaped Pool vinyl package. You can stream the track below via Spotify:<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>Related: Thom Yorke Will Not Attend Radiohead’s Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction, But The Oscars Are A Different StoryLate last year, Radiohead was announced as part of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame‘s 2019 induction class, thought Yorke recently noted that he will not be in attendance at the March 29th, 2019 induction ceremony due to a previously booked engagement in Paris. Of late, Yorke has been concerning himself with promotion of his original score to horror film remake, Suspiria, for which he’s on the shortlist for an Oscar nomination in the “Best Original Song” category. Last week, Yorke announced a new, expanded edition of his Suspiria soundtrack featuring a number of previously unheard tracks.last_img read more

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Writing, clear and simple

first_imgJamie Rees ’12 turned in the first pages of his senior thesis and heard the two words every writer dreads: Start over.“I had to write a draft during first semester,” said Rees, an economics concentrator who is writing about the debt crisis in the Euro zone. “I was still doing a lot of data stuff, and I didn’t want to write anything yet. I ended up spitting out pages of writing that was terrible.”The good news is that the feedback came from bestselling author Walter Isaacson ’74, the former chairman of CNN and managing editor of Time, and was part of the Harvard College Winter Writing Program, a two-week Winter Break seminar for undergraduate nonfiction writers. Rees was one of 50 students admitted to the program, which is co-taught by Isaacson and Evan Thomas ’73, the Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton University and former editor at large at Newsweek.“It’s been great,” said Rees. “The course is moving me in the direction of writing a story and explaining my topic in the form of a narrative, which helps because the Euro crisis is kind of a saga. Professor Isaacson also suggested I cut down some of my sentences and make things clearer.”Clarity and simplicity are frequent themes in the program. Thomas said many Harvard students write well but run into the trap of making the simple complicated, rather than the other way around.“Simple does not mean ‘simpleton,’ ” he said. “Simple often means quite the opposite, that you’ve really thought through the problem and found a clear way to express a complex thought. But students see a lot of different models of writing and think that they have to sound sophisticated by writing convoluted sentences. Really, they should take complicated thoughts and figure out how to render them in a clear way.”Like Rees, each program participant submitted a writing sample, which was reviewed in meetings with Thomas and in small groups with Isaacson. Thomas also asked students to edit their own pieces with direction from a short guide that he authored for the class. Then he had undergraduates trade writing samples with classmates, edit and return the pieces, and compare the results. “The idea is for students to see how they edit their own piece, how their classmates edit the students’ piece, and then look at the difference,” Thomas said.Students convened as a class for 90 minutes every afternoon to hear some of the country’s most distinguished nonfiction writers talk about their craft. During the two-week session, the program welcomed Pulitzer Prize finalist Megan Marshall, National Book Critics Circle Award winner Anne Fadiman, Washington Post columnist Alexandra Petri, and Peabody Award-winning radio host and author Kurt Andersen. The program’s first guest speaker, however, was none other than Harvard University President and Lincoln Professor of History Drew Faust.Faust discussed her most recent book, “This Republic of Suffering,” which looks at the way the Civil War redefined death and identity in American culture. She used the example of a letter she discovered during her research to illustrate the challenges of balancing objectivity and sentimentality in writing about history. The note, written by a dying Mississippi soldier to his father, begins, “You will be delighted to hear from your son.” Faust explained that the “delight” stemmed from the fact that the father would know his son’s fate. The soldier would not be among the many war dead who went missing.“For me, there is a kind of charge from looking at that letter and thinking, ‘Someone touched this,’ ” she said. “The connection to the soldier’s sacrifice, his suffering, is beyond words for me. A professional historian isn’t supposed to care about that. It’s supposed to be what the words are, what the impact of it was, what you interpret from it. But the magic of the embodiment of the letter is sentimental on the one hand, and emotional on the other.”Faust’s candor and passion for her work made an impression on Lena Bae ’12, a government concentrator and program participant.“It might be sentimental,” Bae said, “but as a student debating various potential careers, that’s the kind of bar I’d like to set on whatever it is that I choose — a career where I feel that extent of emotion, not necessarily of the heartbreaking kind, but the kind that reminds me why it is that I have made this choice.”Isaacson, whose most recent work is a best-selling biography of the late Apple Computer co-founder Steve Jobs, said that he and Thomas were getting as much from the students as they were giving. It’s fascinating to talk to students who grew up in the digital age, he said, and to get their thoughts on what shapes nonfiction storytelling will take in the future. A Harvard overseer, Isaacson is even more excited about what the success of a course like this could mean for future Winter Break programming.“It’s interesting to figure out what January can be,” he said. “Harvard teaches academic subjects well, but it would be fun to see if Winter Break could be a time during which more practical subjects could be done on a noncredit basis, whether it’s accounting, emergency medical training, or writing narrative nonfiction. There are all sorts of practitioners who would come to Harvard, even in January, and say, ‘I can teach you something useful.’ ”Bae says the program has taught her to be more conscious of her audience. It’s also taught her that good writing takes time, and many revisions.“I’ve learned to think much more about the reader, especially in terms of making things simple,” she said. “I’ve also learned that writing is a circular and extensive process. Your brain works on your piece during sleep, and gnaws on your ideas throughout the day. This means start early, no matter how badly your first draft comes out, and allow yourself to work on various pieces at the same time. I think simply recognizing that this is the kind of thing that your mind works on slowly will change how I play around with my writing process.”last_img read more

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How far right will Trump’s nominee move the Supreme Court?

first_img With both sides wary of tampering, a government professor tries to game the game on what tactics could follow a close result Harvard community reflects on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a trailblazing, tireless fighter for rights Related President Donald Trump plans to name a Supreme Court justice this week to replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg from a list of 44 nominees. He has said that he will choose a woman and wants to fill the vacancy before the November election. Court observers speculate that he will choose from five contenders: Judge Bridget Bade (U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit), Judge Amy Coney Barrett (U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit), Judge Barbara Lagoa (U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit), Judge Joan Larsen (U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit), and Kate Todd, deputy assistant and deputy counsel to the president. All of the candidates lean much farther right than the liberal Ginsburg, which means the current 5-4 conservative edge on the court would become a powerful 6‒3 majority. How far right could the court move? Really far, says Maya Sen ’00, A.M ’11, Ph.D.’12, a political scientist at Harvard Kennedy School who studies political ideology in the legal profession and the judiciary. Sen and colleagues Adam Bonica (Stanford), Adam Chilton (University of Chicago), and Kyle Rozema (Washington University in St. Louis) analyzed the 44 names on Trump’s list and found that whoever is chosen will be much more conservative than the average American. The Gazette spoke with Sen about the effects this nomination will have on the court’s balance.Q&AMaya SenGAZETTE: Given that the Federalist Society assembled this list, whomever Trump selects will be ideologically conservative. But you and your colleagues have determined that these candidates are not only more conservative than the average American and many major Republican politicians, they’re more conservative than the majority of other conservative judges. Can you explain?SEN: We take this methodology that’s been developed for calculating people’s political preferences, basically their ideology, and we model that as a function of their campaign contributions. The logic is that if I donate money to my senator, Elizabeth Warren, and my House representative, Katherine Clark, both fairly liberal-leaning members of the Massachusetts congressional contingent, you would be able to triangulate my ideology and back out that I’m liberal-leaning also. Because if I was conservative, I wouldn’t be donating money to Elizabeth Warren. The reason why it’s really nice for judges is because the standard measures for estimating ideology don’t really work for judges. Judges tend to sit by themselves, or they sit in small groups of three, and so you can’t use the standard techniques. The standard measure for comparing congressional candidates or congressional representatives or senators in terms of ideology is to look at who they vote with.So we used this campaign finance method to look at the donations made to or by the people on Donald Trump’s short list. We have millions and millions of contributions, not just by them, but by ordinary people from across the political spectrum. The data set is around 100 million people. Thirty-eight of [the 44] had been active political contributors or people had donated to them. There was one notable exception to that: Amy Coney Barrett. She does not have any financial political activity. She’s never received and never made any [political] donations. That might be part of a long-term strategy for appearing to be above the political fray. So we’re looking at other ways to get at her ideology. We’re still working on that.The chart plots the distribution of campaign finance (CF) scores of potential nominees. A score below -1 indicates a person is more liberal than about 16 percent of the population, with a score above +1 indicating they are more conservative than about 16 percent of the population. The chart also includes federal circuit court judges as of 2018, illustrating that compared to the judges who are right of center, 83 percent of Trump’s list of potential nominees are in the top half of those conservative judges. Graphic courtesy of Maya SenGAZETTE: Like former Harvard Law Dean Elena Kagan, J.D. ’86, there is no long paper trail of judicial opinions by Coney Barrett, to easily quantify her views, as she spent most of her career in academia. But she did clerk for the late Justice Antonin Scalia, has expressed views on issues that are reliably conservative, and has the approval of the Federalist Society.SEN: She’s conservative enough. Is she as conservative as Clarence Thomas or is she more like Samuel Alito? I don’t know, but she’s conservative to the point where she’d be a very reliable voting member of the conservative supermajority.GAZETTE: Trump has stated he intends to appoint a woman to the bench. If it is Coney Barrett or Judge Barbara Lagoa, what does adding another conservative justice do to the ideological parity of the court?SEN: [Chief Justice] John Roberts ’76, J.D. ’79, was the swing vote [last term]. Given that Justice Anthony Kennedy, L.L.B. ’61, had retired and he was the previous swing, the swing moved to the next conservative person on the scale. Everyone knew [Roberts] would be the pivotal person and that’s what happened. He was in the 5‒4 majority across all of the blockbuster cases. Now what happens is that a person who was a reliable liberal has passed away, and that means that Justice Ginsburg is going to be replaced with someone who is more conservative than Justice Roberts. Every one of the 44 is more conservative than Roberts and almost certainly than the next most conservative two people, [Justices Brett] Kavanaugh and [Neil] Gorsuch, J.D. ’91. People are disagreeing about who the next swing [vote] will be, Kavanaugh or Gorsuch. I think it’s going to be Gorsuch. [But either way,] these are two incredibly conservative men. The shift is going to be significant.,GAZETTE: Why is the judiciary’s rightward drift happening? Is it simply the volume of federal vacancies a Republican president and Republican Senate majority have been able to fill since 2017?SEN: I think it is a combination of things. One is undoubtedly the very deft strategizing by Senate Republicans to maintain vacancies during the last part of the Obama administration. There was a concerted effort to keep as many seats open and to stall as long as possible with the hopes that a Republican would win the White House in 2016. There were all these vacancies ready for Trump.With Trump, I think he hasn’t been given a wide latitude with his judicial appointments. His administration is working closely with the Federalist Society. He’s been advised by Leonard Leo, head of the Federalist Society. It’s a legitimate network with a deep bench of very talented, very smart people who have this goal dating back to the mid-1980s. This is what they’ve been working for. You can see, all of these efforts, all of this infrastructure they put in place. This is their moment. I’m not a member of the Federalist Society, but you have to hand it to them. From a strategic, raw political perspective, they just outmaneuvered the Democrats.GAZETTE: Many liberals and even some moderates view an overwhelmingly conservative Supreme Court as a negative. Is there an ideal ideological balance the court should maintain?SEN: That’s a really hard question. There are many reasons why that’s a hard question, but one of them is that scholars [and] lay observers of the courts, we don’t even agree on what the “ideal” is. Is the ideal for the court to be representative? That’s one possible ideal. I think Democrats would say is it a progressive court that protects the rights of minorities? That’s one ideal. Republicans would say are these non-activist judges who respect the Constitution in its original meaning? That’s another ideal. If we’re thinking about how representative the court is of ordinary Americans, this is a pretty sharp shift to the right. This would put the court ideologically out of step with average Americans. This would make the court much more representative probably of the Republican Party. So if we want the court to be representative, this is not a step in the right direction. With the Roberts court last year, with Roberts as the swing [vote], they were reaching pretty moderate decisions. At this moment, the court is kind of in sync with public opinion. But what I expect will happen is it will move sharply to the right. The conservative voting bloc is much more emboldened, or it will be. That’s going to lag a little bit — the court being out of step with public opinion. We’re not going to see the real ramifications of that for another year. It’ll take maybe three decisions for the court to walk back the moderate reputation it earned last term. How to change an election The life and legacy of RBG Possible bellwethers: Turnout, Florida, and voters 65 and older Pollster looks at how pandemic, loss of RBG may affect election GAZETTE: Short of another vacancy, what factors could shift the court ideologically in the other direction?SEN: Expanding the court under a Biden administration would increase the number of justices — I’ve heard anything from two to nine or something. I don’t think there’s a clear frontrunner in terms of a plan. My sense is that this is something that people who are more ideologically to the far left are supportive of. My reading of the politics of it is that moderates like [Democratic presidential nominee Joe] Biden and [Sen. Dianne] Feinstein and [Sen. Joe] Manchin are not really supportive of it. It really is a nuclear option. The one that’s the most politically viable is term limits because there are reasons why Republicans might find that appealing; and there are reasons why Democrats would find that appealing. So it seems like there’s more common support for term limits. For Republicans, it’s attractive because you don’t get these [judges] who drift toward the liberal side over time, which is something they’re very worried about. You don’t get the Earl Warrens. For Democrats, you don’t get people who refuse to retire.GAZETTE: What effect does a Supreme Court that’s out of step ideologically with the electorate have on democracy?SEN: We have some inklings based on decisions that the Roberts court has rendered on voting rights, and we know the conservative bloc is less supportive of expansive voting rights. They are more tolerant of partisan gerrymandering; they were willing to strike down portions of the Voting Rights Act in 2013. So the expectation is that this is not a court that is going to be friendly to voting rights. And so, the real concern that people who operate at the intersection of judicial politics and electoral politics have is that this is a court that could potentially undermine electoral and democratic systems in the United States and make it harder for people to vote than it is currently. If you have that, it just gets harder and harder to vote, and districts become more and more gerrymandered, and so that just entrenches a certain party in power. And in this case, that would be the Republican Party. That’s the worry. Once you undermine the way that our elected officials are elected, it’s really tough to bounce back from that. You have to consistently rely on these huge margins of victory to regain some semblance of representation. And that’s really hard.This interview has been edited for clarity and length.last_img read more

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Water Plan.

first_imgNot being able to water your homegrown tomatoes is an inconvenience.Not being able to water 4,000 greenhouse plants is a major concernif you own the greenhouse.To keep the state’s drought from burning up their profits,representatives of nine Georgia urban agriculture associationsmet in August 2000 to discuss the lingering water shortage. Fromthat meeting, they formed the Georgia Urban Agriculture Coalition.The coalition’s first work was to begin searching for solutionsto the water shortage problems facing the people who grow, installand maintain the plants that brighten urban landscapes.Reservoirs Still Below Average”Although recent weather systems and storms have broughtsome immediate relief, water levels at reservoirs across the stateremain well below average,” said Wayne Gardner, coordinatorof the University of Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture anda coalition member. “Weather experts continue to predicta hotter and drier summer than the 50-year average.”Gardner says the state’s drought isn’t totally to blame forthe current water shortage. The growing population is increasinglystraining Georgia’s water supply.”The drought that began four years ago was a major wakeupcall for us all,” Gardner said. “It actually just turnedan impending water crisis into an immediate water crisis.”Georgia’s population has doubled in the past 50 years. Roughlyhalf of that growth was in the past decade.”If the population growth trends continue, Georgia couldbe home to more than 16 million people within 30 years,”Gardner said. “This growth is occurring with a relativelyconstant supply of water that originates solely within our state.”Planning For The Drought and BeyondThe water crisis in Georgia won’t end when the drought does,he said. So Georgia must develop a water-use plan.Since the success of urban agriculture in Georgia relies heavilyon water, the GUAC decided they had to become actively involvedin developing a state water-use plan.The coalition organized a water task force to focus on developingstrategies for the industry to follow. The task force’s firstobjective was to document the size and economic impact of thestate’s urban agricultural industry.Economists and horticulturists from the UGA College of Agriculturaland Environmental Sciences conducted a survey that caused somejaws to drop.”The impact to the state’s economy is almost $5.7 billioneach year,” Gardner said. “And that’s not counting valued-addedimpact like (agricultural) tourism.”Science-based GuidelinesThe second objective was to establish science-based water-managementguidelines for urban agriculture.”The guidelines ensure plant health and survival whileconserving water,” Gardner said. “Basically, we’re tryingto help the industry remain economically viable during water shortageswhile stressing water management and conservation.”These new irrigation guidelines now serve as a basis for intermediate-phaseoutdoor water restriction plans for Georgia cities and water authorities.Next, the GUAC’s task force mobilized members to help developa state drought management plan. A draft was released this monthfor public comment.”Urban agriculture interests are represented in the draftdocument because of the hard work of the coalition members,”Gardner said.”Georgia’s urban agricultural industries must remain involvedin all aspects of these water issues,” he said. “Theseindustries are only beginning to show how they conserve and preservethe quantity and quality of our water resources while making ahuge impact on the state’s economy.”last_img read more

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Livestock lessons

first_imgBy Mike IsbellUniversity of Georgia”I really messed up,” said 13-year-old Levi George, a HeardCounty 4-H Club member, at the conclusion of the cattle show.Levi had two registered Angus heifers. They were both in the sameclass at the show, which meant Levi had two show calves competingagainst each other. But he couldn’t show both calves at the sametime in the show ring.So he talked his 10-year-old brother Luke into showing the secondheifer for him.The heifer Luke showed won first place in the class and $30. Lukeshowed it again in the division final and won “Grand ChampionAngus” and $50. Finally, Luke and the heifer went on to win”Supreme Champion,” making it the top heifer at the show andwinning another $150.’I really messed up'”Man, I really messed up,” Levi repeated to himself.”Well, what’s the matter?” I asked him. “Your heifer won thewhole show. So what did you mess up about?”Levi shook his head in dismay and replied, “I promised Luke ifhe’d show my calf for me, he could have all the prize money thecalf won!”$230 in prize money may sound like a lot to a 13-year-old, butthe value is not in the prize money. It’s in what the juniorlivestock project teaches.Bill Hodge, the University of Georgia Extension agent in CarrollCounty, said most youth livestock projects aren’t economicallysound. But then, raising kids isn’t economically sound, either.Livestock lessonsLivestock projects teach kids to get along with each other andrespect each other. You should see how they all pitch in and helpeach other out — even if it means helping the competition.They know that getting beat is just a part of growing up. Andtheir time to win will come. Even if it’s not in the show ring.Livestock projects teach responsibility. They teach kids tofaithfully provide for the animals in their care. Training theiranimals for the show teaches them the value of consistency andpersistence.And the fact that the kids have to look after another livingcreature teaches them that we, as humans, are responsible forthis world we live in. They learn to be good stewards of theearth.They learn the kinds of things that will help keep this a niceplace to live for their kids.last_img read more

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Blue Ridge Outdoors Top Towns Nominee: Blue Ridge, Georgia

first_imgIf Ellijay is the mountain biking capital of Georgia, then it could be said that Fannin County—home to the town of Blue Ridge—is its fly-fishing counterpart. Because of certain conditions, namely a TVA operated dam that fills nearby rivers and streams with cool, trout-friendly water, Fannin County is home to some of the biggest trout in the southeast. One waterway in Blue Ridge that’s not to be missed is the 16-mile Taccoa River. As a true tailwater fishery, the Toccoa and its tributaries are home wild trout, stockies, and even some lunker-sized holdovers.In addition to prime trout habitat, Blue Ridge provides access to the Benton MacKaye Trail, the AT by way of Springer Mountain, the Cohutta Wilderness area, and the Aska Adventure Trails Area.Cudas_IB_0814_2Did you know? Blue Ridge is home to elite bamboo fly rod maker Bill Oyster, whose world famous, hand crafted rods have been commissioned by the likes of Jimmy Carter and Ted Turner.Vote now at blueridgeoutdoors.com!last_img read more

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