Nuns offer applied communications experience

first_imgAssociate professor of communications Marne Austin took a new angle on her Introduction to Communications course last fall, requiring her 40 students to travel to the convent of the Sisters of the Holy Cross in order to speak to local nuns.If students are not actually doing communication, there is no point in studying it, Austin said.“Even though we are Saint Mary’s, founded by the sisters and have the convent right here, it is often the case that young women can go through all four years of college without ever knowingly interacting with the sisters, which is a huge bummer,” Austin said. “Whether you identify as a Catholic or not, it’s important to understand our history and legacy being at this school.“The three young sisters who founded the College did so when the odds were against them, and to have the courage to do what they did is pretty remarkable and should be a story of empowerment for the women here.”Students met with their assigned sisters five times over a five-week period, Austin said. Their assignment involved gathering oral histories from the sisters on their experiences in faith and service with plans to eventually compile a video documentary for the College and congregation.Austin said she plans to use this practice in all of her introductory courses because it is a great way to engage both the ideal of interpersonal communication and understanding history.“I think every moment is a moment of intercultural and interpersonal growth. So often we get stuck in our heads some idea of what ‘normal’ is, and there’s no such thing,” she said. “We think that people are the same and there’s this assumed homogeneity. “Even when we live in a place like South Bend or like Saint Mary’s, where we look around and think we know these people, we all have such different diverse stories to tell. There’s always those people in our communities who we overlook, including those right across the street from us or our neighbors who we see all the time, but we really have no idea who they are.”The majority of the students were apprehensively excited about connecting with the sisters, but by the end of the five visits, all had gained invaluable stories to share with others, Austin said.“But that isn’t to say that they didn’t have some hard times with it,” she said. “We did have a few sisters who had problems with Alzheimer’s, so a lot of the women in the classroom had to cope with that. They learned some awesome lessons from this and had to work in handling ethical issues.”First-year student Kathryn Mathews said the experience completely changed her ideas of nuns since she is not Catholic and previously believed nuns spent their entire days in prayer and reflection. Matthews was paired with Maura Brannick, a retired nurse from St. Joseph Hospital. “When she [Brannick] saw all the poverty in town, she wanted to set up a free clinic for patients but didn’t have much money,” Matthews said. “So while working at the hospital, she met some interesting characters who eventually helped her fund her project, like one Notre Dame student who was volunteering there.”Mathews said Brannick discovered this Notre Dame student donated money toward her goal years later.“The student told Sister Brannick that she would be the first one he’d see when he makes his millions,” Mathews said.Sister Brannick formed friendships with a local motorcycle gang, who also helped her clinic get started. “They told her to let them know if anyone messed with her,” Mathews said. “She still goes to the clinic once a week. She wants to help the community as long as she lives.”Mathews said over the five weeks, she and Sister Brannick grew very close, and though she had never met a sister before the class, she really enjoyed building their friendship.Sophomore Lauren Wells also thought the project was an amazing idea, though she was initially hesitant to ask a stranger personal questions.“I was partnered with Sister Mary Elizabeth Loughran, and she was a joy to work with,” Wells said. “I began to look forward to my afternoons with her because they became a highlight of my week.“It added so much peace and clarity to my life to talk with her and share our experiences. As our relationship continued to grow, the interviews were almost like therapy sessions. It was a time that all my anxiety from student teaching, homework and other extracurricular [activities] just went out the window, and Sister Mary Elizabeth helped me gain perspective on life.”Wells said her pairing was an act of fate, as the two women had so many things in common.“I’m studying to be an English teacher, and she spent years of her sisterhood doing the same thing,” Wells said. “Also, I’ve attended several mission trips to Belize, and in the same way, Sister Mary Elizabeth spent over 20 [years] working in Brazil to spread her mission and teach in schools there.”Austin hopes her students will continue to engage with people around the College who have such great stories to share.Currently, Austin is teaching an introductory course where the students will meet younger sisters in the convent and shadow them on a day where the sisters work in the local community. “It’s our ethical imperative to understand each other’s stories in building our community,” Austin said. “That’s why I embark on such projects. It’s the only way we’re going to grow.”Tags: Marne Austinlast_img read more

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Which Broadway Star Had a Crush on Winnie Cooper From The Wonder Years?

first_img TERENCE ARCHIE (APOLLO CREED IN ROCKY) “Wonder Woman… Any news anchor women in general.” This week, we have a special Valentine’s Day surprise for you! It’s way better than a box of chocolates. A dozen roses? Come on, those are just going to die in a week anyway. Our gift to you is a peek into the romantic, silly and sometimes completely wacky love lives of your favorite Broadway stars! In the first installment of our week-long series, we asked Jarrod Spector, Kelli O’Hara, Danny Burstein and more to tell us all about their childhood crushes. Who made these stars swoon? Find out below. JARROD SPECTOR (BARRY MANN IN BEAUTIFUL) “Winnie from The Wonder Years. Who else?” KELLI O’HARA (FRANCESCA IN THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY) “I have to say Kurt Russell. I mean, of course I had posters up all over of boys like Ricky Schroder and Corey Haim and Scott Baio. But KURT RUSSELL. He was my guy.” SANTINO FONTANA (MOSS HART IN ACT ONE) “That girl on The Mickey Mouse Club. I can’t remember her name, but she had crimped hair. Close second, Eggo waffles.” KARINE PLANTADIT (PERFORMER IN AFTER MIDNIGHT) “A boy my age, five, who was missing a finger. He invited me to spend the weekend on his boat. At five, my parents did not agree, though I threw the best tantrum of my life.” COURTNEY REED (JASMINE IN ALADDIN) “Sigh… Devon Sawa from Casper and Now and Then.” DANNY BURSTEIN (HERR SCHULTZ IN CABARET) “Basically any girl. Sad. That’s really pathetic, isn’t it? LOL.” COREY COTT (JACK KELLY IN NEWSIES) “Mary-Kate Olsen. Every time she had an on-screen kiss, whether it was Passport to Paris, Winning London or Our Lips Are Sealed, my heart sank that much more.” Check back every day this week for more Valentine’s Day surprises! View Commentslast_img read more

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In-person summer camps starts Monday at Roberson

first_imgHowever, the camp won’t happen without changes. All staff members and campers will be required to wear masks, the number of campers will be capped at 10, and social distancing will be enforced. Additionally, every camper will get their own supplies to be used during the week to limit common touch points. Cole says while virtual experiences are nice, at the Roberson, in-person is hard to beat. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — As many summer camps are going virtual this summer, the Roberson Museum and Science Center is welcoming campers through their doors this summer. “We kept seeing all of the other organizations in the area shutting down their summer camps, so we really wanted to make sure that we ran them,” Cole said. “We want them to get out of the house, we want interaction outside of my own home.” “With the camps, in person, we’re allowed to use the exhibitions in the building, we’re allowed to use the mansion, the different space we have here, whereas virtually it’s nice to look at them but you’re not going to get the same reaction, the same interaction as you would if the kids were here in the exhibitions themselves,” she said. The Roberson will host camps starting on July 13 and will run until early September. Public programs coordinator Kelly Cole said giving kids in the area an opportunity to learn this summer was vital in the Roberson’s decision.last_img read more

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Governor Wolf: Pennsylvania’s Uninsured Rate at Historic Low

first_img Healthcare,  Medicaid Expansion,  Press Release,  Public Health Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today announced that Pennsylvania’s uninsured rate declined slightly from 5.6 percent in 2016 to 5.5 percent in 2017 – the lowest on record. The decrease continues the downward trend since the Affordable Care Act’s passage despite efforts from the federal government to undermine its progress.“Pennsylvania has taken significant steps to provide Pennsylvanians with access to affordable health coverage, and the result is that the uninsured rate has dropped by more than half in the past eight years,” Gov. Tom Wolf said. “One of my first actions as governor was authorizing the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Along with the ongoing advocacy efforts of the Pennsylvania Insurance Department and Department of Human Services, more Pennsylvanians than ever are covered, and our insurance market is stable and competitive.”Pennsylvania’s 5.5 percent uninsured rate was released as part of a national study on health insurance coverage for 2017 based on current population reports issued by the United States Census Bureau this week. The decrease is considerably lower than the national uninsured rate of 8.8 percent.More than a million Pennsylvanians have comprehensive health care under the ACA through expanded Medicaid or the marketplace.“The Insurance Department has been working tirelessly to inform consumers about their options and ensure that the market is competitive and stable,” said Insurance Commissioner Jessica Altman. The record low number of uninsured shows that Pennsylvanians want and deserve access to health coverage. Open enrollment is just six weeks away, so I urge Pennsylvanians who want to enroll or re-enroll in a marketplace plan to start thinking about their coverage needs and to be fully informed about their choices.”“This data shows that despite efforts to undo the progress made by the Affordable Care Act and its coverage improvements, the individual market and Medicaid expansion are still working and helping Pennsylvanians get the coverage they need,” said Human Services Secretary Teresa Miller. “Government should always be looking for ways to make quality, comprehensive coverage more accessible and affordable for the people they serve, and we will not give up this goal.”For more information about health insurance options in Pennsylvania, visit www.insurance.pa.gov or www.healthchoices.pa.gov. Governor Wolf: Pennsylvania’s Uninsured Rate at Historic Low September 13, 2018center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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South Africa debates on Gun Laws after the Killing of Police…

first_imgSouth Africa has awoken to the menace of guns in the country after the killing of police officers. At least 60 police officers have been killed this year in the country.According to Gun Free South Africa 18 people are shot dead everyday in South AfricaSouth Africans own guns as a basic necessity with the increased criminal rates in the county; the country has more than 1.8 million licensed guns.last_img

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PRICE FREEZE: Profiteers warned as people struggle with ‘Ursula’ devastation

first_imgIn a bulletin issued at 5 p.m.yesterday, the state weather bureau announced that “Ursula” was already 300kilometers northwest of Coron, Palawan, or 295 kilometers west southwest ofSubic, Zambales. Yesterday, DTI started deploying teamsto monitor prices most especially in northern Iloilo and other parts ofnorthern Panay and Negros islands. Hoarding is the undue accumulation ofany basic commodity beyond the normal inventory levels, or the unreasonablelimitation or refusal to dispose of, sell or distribute the stocks of any basicnecessity or prime commodity to the general public, or the unjustified takingout of any basic necessity or prime commodity from the channels ofreproduction, trade, commerce and industry. By 5 p.m. on Dec. 25, the PhilippineAtmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa)lifted all typhoon signals in northern Iloilo. Rascon said the price freeze may lastfor some 60 days maximum as stated in Republic Act (RA) 7581 or the Price Act. Profiteering is the sale or offeringfor sale of any basic necessity or prime commodity at a price grossly in excessof its true worth. The northern part of Western Visayaswas under typhoon signal No. 3 from the night of Dec. 24 to the afternoon ofDec. 25. * that area is proclaimed or declareda disaster area or under a state of calamity* that area is declared under an emergency* the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus is suspended in that area* that area is placed under martial law* that area is declared to be in a state of rebellion; or* a state of war is declared in that area Under Section 6 (Automatic Price Control) ofRA 7581, prices of basic necessities in an area shall automaticallybe frozen at their prevailing prices or placed under automatic price controlwhenever: Under Section 15 (Penalty for Acts of IllegalPrice Manipulation) of RA 7581, a person who commits price manipulation shallsuffer the penalty of imprisonment for a period of not less than five years normore than 15 years, and shall be imposed a fine of not less than P5,000 normore than P2 million./PNcenter_img The typhoon was still moving westnorthwest at 15 kilometers per hour (km/h). It maintained its strength, withmaximum winds of 120 km/h and gustiness of up to 150 km/h going to the WestPhilippine Sea. What should be followed are theprevailing prices as of Nov. 24 – these are the suggested retail pricesreleased by DTI on October 2019 – or a month before the typhoon struck, saidRascon. Rascon said the DTI monitoring teamswould also check if the supply of goods is sufficient in the typhoon-hit areas. Basic necessities identified underRA 7581 include rice, corn, bread, fresh, dried and canned fish and othermarine products, fresh pork, beef and poultry meal, fresh eggs, fresh andprocessed milk, fresh vegetables, root crops, coffee, sugar, cooking oil, salt,laundry soap, detergents, firewood, charcoal, candles, and drugs classified asessential by the Department of Health. DTI Region 6 will make sure this isobserved, said Director Rebecca Rascon following the moves of the provincialgovernments of Capiz and Aklan, the municipal governments of Carles and Balasanin Iloilo province, and the town of Pandan in Antique to declare a state ofcalamity due to the destruction left by typhoon “Ursula.” ILOILO City – A freeze in the pricesof basic necessities is automatic in areas under a state of calamity, accordingto the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI). On the other hand, a cartel is anycombination of or agreement between two or more persons engaged in theproduction, manufacture, processing, storage, supply, distribution, marketing,sale or disposition of any basic necessity or prime commodity designed toartificially and unreasonably increase or manipulate its price. She warned traders not to takeadvantage of the difficult situation by manipulating prices (hoarding,profiteering, cartel). This is a violation of RA 7581, she stressed.last_img read more

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Report: Farm-Related Fatalities Declining

first_img(Hoosier Ag Today)– Eighteen farm-related fatalities were documented in Indiana in 2013, down from 26 the previous year and reflecting a trend of fewer deadly accidents on the farm, a Purdue University report shows. The 2013 Indiana Farm Fatality Summary data show there have been fewer than 30 documented deaths from farm-related accidents each year since 1996. Before then, deaths of well more than 30 people each year were common going back to at least 1970, with two years having at least 50. There also has been a continued decline in the number of farm fatalities involving children and other young people under the age of 21. Only one documented victim in 2013 was under the age of 21, a 15-year-old boy who died when a tractor overturned on him in Elkhart County. ”Achieving zero incidents may be an unrealistic goal, but the record clearly shows that something is working and that many tragic incidents have been prevented during the same time as Indiana farmers have become more productive and efficient than at any time in history,” wrote co-authors Bill Field, Purdue Extension safety specialist, and agricultural and biological engineering graduate research assistant Yuan-Hsin Cheng.Contributing to fewer fatalities, the authors said, are a decline in the number of Indiana residents who live and work on farms; advancements in the safety, durability and productivity of agricultural equipment; reduced dependency on youth labor; increasing expectations for safer and healthier workplaces; and continued efforts to increase awareness of the importance of managing risks in agriculture.Advancements in medical care, including that provided by emergency services, also have contributed to lower fatality rates by increasing the probability of victims surviving injuries that once were deadly, according to the report. The authors said the fatalities count, compiled by the Purdue University Agricultural Safety and Health Program, might not be comprehensive because of the lack of consistent reporting requirements, Indiana residents dying at medical facilities in neighboring states, and victims dying from related medical complications well after an accident. The count was tallied through a variety of sources, including news reports, Web searches, voluntary reporting from Purdue Extension educators and individuals, and personal interviews.Accidents were documented in the following counties in 2013: Bartholomew (2), Dearborn, Dubois, Elkhart, Fountain, Franklin, Fulton, Hancock, Hendricks, Howard, Koskiusko, Lake, LaPorte (2), Lawrence, Marshall and Posey. Accidents included suffocation in a grain bin; falling from a tractor and a concrete silo; an overturned mower, tractor and all-terrain vehicle; and being struck by farm equipment, among other causes. There were three instances in which victims died from being hit by a falling tree. The age of the victims ranged from 15 to 78 and averaged 61.4. All were males.The authors noted a “dramatic decline” in the number of children and young adults reported as dying in agricultural workplaces. There have been only three reported deaths of people under the age of 18 in the past three years, the lowest number of such victims in a three-year period since at least beginning in 1994.  ”It is believed that the changing expectations of parents and the general public toward having children and youth employed in some types of farm work, considered especially hazardous, has had a significant influence on the declining trend in fatalities involving this group,” the authors said. “The introduction of larger, more complex and expensive equipment has also made many producers less comfortable using inexperienced workers to operate it.”last_img read more

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Wilma Sue Bates, 60, Osgood

first_imgWilma Sue Bates, 60, of Osgood passed away at 5am, Friday, May 18, 2018 at the Margaret Mary Community Hospital in Batesville. She was born in Chicago on July 17, 1957 the daughter of Paul and Grace Eversole Turner. She was married to Bruce Bates on March 7, 2014 and he survives. Other survivors include two daughters Rhonda (Donald) Clark, and Pamela DeWitt both of Versailles; one step-son Chris (Amanda) Bates of Greensburg; two step-daughters Amanda Bates of Westmoreland, Tennessee, and Brandy (Donald) Howington of Sunman; 8 grandchildren, and 10 step-grandchildren; one brother Arlie Turner of Milan. She was preceded in death by her parents. Mrs. Bates was a 1975 graduate of Jac-Cen-Del High School. She was a former employee of US Shoe in Osgood and worked at Deoful in Sunman as a packer for 21 years. Funeral services will be held on Monday, May 21st at 7pm at the Stratton-Karsteter Funeral Home in Versailles with Bro. Ray West officiating. Visitation will be on Monday from 5pm until time of services. Memorials may be given to the donor’s choice in care of the funeral home.last_img read more

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