Glostik Willy Is Taking Their “Hippy Metal” Nationwide On Spring 2017 Tour

first_imgThis Spring, Indiana-based funky rock three-piece Glostik Willy has embarked on a a nationwide run of shows as part of their “Toast The Coast” 2017 Spring Tour. As the tour rolls on, the band will take their “hippy metal” jams through Florida, Texas, New Mexico, California, Oregon, and Wisconsin, before ending up back in the midwest at May Daze 2017 in College Corner, OH on May 5th-6th. Says guitars Jameson Bradford of the tour, “We are finally doing it and taking our time while creating new friends along the way, making our story with those who love us in these far-off places…they’ve never had the chance to see us and now they can!”You can check out the music video for “Alibi” from Glostik Willy’s most recent album, Willy Town, below:Glostik Willy was formed in early 2008 by Jameson “Jay Moe” Bradford (guitar), his brother Ralf Mowf (drums) and childhood best friend Buddha Aguilar (bass). At the time, the boys were already five year veterans of the Midwest Music scene, having started their first band together at age 12. Since then, Glostik Willy has developed and sought to bridge the gap between rock and jam by forming their own genre of music that can only be described as “Hippy Metal.” To date, Glostik Willy has logged over 600 performances in more than 25 states and 2 countries. The band has hosted eight Midwest music and arts festivals, including their signature Willy Fest (headlined this past year by Molly Hatchet), and performed sets at over 70 festivals around the country.Accompanying Glostik Willy on the tour as special guest is jam poet FlowPoetry on his “Weaving Whispers” Spring Tour 2017. FlowPoetry, the “originator of Jam Poetry” from Madison, WI, will weave his socially conscious poems and stories throughout each show, bringing a spoken word element to each event.For a full list of upcoming dates for both acts, head here (Glostik Willy) and here (Flowpoetry).last_img read more

Read More »

Aaron Lee Tasjan Showcases Love For Retro Americana Rock On “Tiny Desk Concert” [Watch]

first_imgSinger and guitarist Aaron Lee Tasjan has spent the last few years continuing to develop and share his experimental, yet warmingly familiar Americana rock sound as a solo artist. Tasjan was one of the latest artists to take part in NPR‘s “Tiny Desk Concert” series, and his three-song office performance at the radio station’s oiffice headquarters was shared on Tuesday.Aaron and his backing trio comprised of drummer Seth Earnest, guitarist Brian Wright, and bassist Tommy Scifres delivered three songs from Tasjan’s 2018 studio album, Karma For Cheap. The 15-minute set begins with a performance of “Songbird”. The groovy flow of the easygoing tune is a wonderful contrast to the sharp, almost piercing tone of Wright’s electric guitar. It may be January, but the warmth of the rock song almost makes the listener feel like they’re strolling through the park on another warm, sunny afternoon in mid-July. Next comes “End of the Day”, another song with 1960’s flower power spirit to go with modernized song structure. Tasjan plays predominantly with electric instruments these days, but hearing the strum-friendly flow to the song reveals that he’s still an acoustic songwriter at heart.Tasjan wastes no time in tearing into the opening riff of the performance’s final song, “Set You Free”. The semi-psychedelic 1960’s rock sound is more than evident with the help of his 12-string guitar. The song initially sounds more like The Byrds on speed rather than something out of today’s music scene. Yet, Tasjan has made a career thus far by translating his love for classic rock tones and styles into his own interpretations of modernized rock. Fans can tune into the video below to watch the performance at Bob Boilen‘s desk in full.Aaron Lee Tasjan – Tiny Desk Concert[Video: NPR]Tasjan spent most of 2018 on tour with appearances at notable music events including Atlanta’s Sweetwater 420 Festival, San Francisco’s Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, and Tennessee’s Pilgrimage Music & Cultural Festival, just to name a few. He’ll head out on his 2019 winter-into-spring world tour beginning later this week with an appearance at the 30A Songwriters Festival in Santa Rosa Beach, Florida on January 18th. Fans can head over to his website for ticketing information.last_img read more

Read More »

Harvard goes to war

first_imgThis year will mark the 70th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, the “day of infamy” that drew the United States into World War II.And tomorrow (Nov. 11) is Veterans Day, the first at Harvard since the University reinstated a campus office for the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps. So what better time to recount Harvard’s role in World War II:On May 29, 1940, Harvard President James Bryant Conant, speaking as a private citizen, delivered a national radio broadcast urging aid to the Allies in preparation for war. “We must rearm at once,” he said, sentiments that earned him jeers from the isolationist community.That same year, Harvard faculty members formed the American Defense-Harvard Group in support of aiding the Allies. Early in 1941, Conant — an increasingly influential voice for the military draft, lend-lease programs, and other preparedness stances — led a mission to England on exchanging scientific information.By 1941, Harvard scientists were mobilizing, and had started research on explosives, radio electronics, and military medicine.The day after the Pearl Harbor attacks, Conant spoke to 1,200 students gathered in Sanders Theatre to hear the broadcast of President Franklin Roosevelt’s war message to Congress. Conant pledged to bend Harvard’s full resources to the war effort.By 1942, with Harvard dubbed “Conant’s Arsenal,” researchers were at work on radar jamming, night vision, aerial photography, sonar, explosives, napalm, a protocomputer, blood plasma derivatives, synthesized quinine, anti-malarial drugs, and new treatments for burns and shock. Other researchers worked on code-breaking and atomic bomb research. By 1945, Harvard income from government contracts was $33.5 million, the third highest among U.S. universities.Harvard redid its academic calendar to add a third (summer) semester, and for a time largely became a military training school. ROTC members drilled in Memorial Hall with WWI-era rifles. Drills in Harvard Yard scalped off the grass.By May 1942, Army and Navy ROTC members at Harvard numbered 1,600.Harvard’s curriculum was expanded to include aerial mapping, meteorology, camouflage, military geology, and accelerated programs A secret radio electronics detection course trained 2,000 Army, Navy, and Marine officers a year. An Army chaplains’ school, with non-Harvard faculty and 330 students per four-week session, met in the Germanic (now Busch-Reisinger) Museum.By June 1942, all of Harvard was on a wartime footing. Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson spoke at Commencement, along with Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox. About 200 faculty members had already joined the service.At the ceremony, Conant noted that war-related science was expanding so fast that it required space in Harvard Law School’s Austin Hall as well as the Hemenway Gymnasium. “Of what goes on behind those closed doors,” he added, “no word may now be told.”By then, Conant was chairman of the National Research Defense Committee, which would issue nearly 900 contracts during the war. Harvard’s largest projects were the $16 million Radio Research Laboratory and the $8 million Underwater Sound Laboratory.Chemistry Professor George B. Kistiakowsky tested new explosives and later led the Manhattan Project’s search for a way to trigger a nuclear bomb.Professor of organic chemistry Louis Fieser invented napalm, lightweight incendiary grenades, and the M-1 firestarter used for sabotage — and known as the “Harvard candle.”Harvard astronomer Fred Lawrence Whipple invented the strips of aluminum foil, or “chaff,” used to dupe enemy radar. Whipple was dubbed the “Air Corps chief of chaff.”The Electro-Acoustic Laboratory on Oxford Street researched ways to quiet noise in long-range bombers. One discovery to come out of that lab was fiberglass.In the Underwater Sound Laboratory in Hemenway, 450 employees (many of them women) worked on developing sonar. Some of the field testing was done at Spy Pond. The lab’s bearing-direction indicator for sonar and torpedo steering helped break the dominance of Nazi submarine wolf packs.At the Business School, the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory helped set standards for clothing, nutrition, and survival gear in extreme environments.The Harvard project that most influenced postwar science was the Mark I “automatic sequence-controlled calculator,” a protocomputer developed in the Computation Laboratory by Howard Hathaway Aiken, Ph.D. ’39, in cooperation with IBM. Unveiled in the summer of 1944, it was 51 feet long, and contained 72 tiered adding machines and 500 miles of wire. It was used to calculate ballistic tables and for Manhattan Project calculations.Harvard’s first cyclotron, a $55,000, 85-ton particle accelerator built in 1939 that was used in nuclear physics experiments, was shipped to Los Alamos, N.M., in 1943 for work on the first atomic bomb.In September 1943, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill accepted the honorary degree he had been offered in May. “The empires of the future,” he said in a speech on Anglo-American unity, “are the empires of the mind.”On June 29, 1944, with Harvard remaining a virtual military training facility, graduating seniors in the regular degree course numbered only 19, the smallest number since 1753.During World War II, almost 27,000 Harvard students, alumni, faculty members, and staff members served in the armed forces, and 697 dielast_img read more

Read More »

The unsavory side of sugar

first_imgWednesday’s symposium also featured a talk by Barry Popkin, a food science researcher at the University of North Carolina who tracks worldwide trends in policies affecting sugar marketing. He said that while some countries, such as Mexico, have instituted a sugar tax, the best results have been seen in Chile, where the government has aggressively regulated food marketing. Sugary products cannot be advertised on children’s television, the packaging cannot use kid-friendly characters, and clear ratings are included on packages.“When you have preschool kids seeing these symbols on a product, and telling their mothers they shouldn’t buy it, you know you’re seeing a shift in norms,” Popkin said.Event co-organizer Frank Hu, the Fredrick J. Stare Professor of Nutrition and epidemiology chair, Department of Nutrition, at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, followed Popkin with a report on the relation between sugary foods, particularly SSBs, and epidemiology. He said evidence shows a clear link between soda and childhood obesity, and the problem continues through adulthood.Hu said the average American consumes 22 teaspoons of added sugar a day, and sodas are not the only culprits. Fruit juices may be healthier, but are considerably less healthy than whole fruits. And sports drinks are associated with a higher BMI (body mass index), a factor that’s not alleviated by playing sports.Grinspoon said Wednesday’s audience was broad and included “clinicians, researchers, and students at different levels.” He pointed out that there was no support from the food industry or any industry presence on the panels. “They are welcome to come as audience members, but we didn’t want to be influenced by the industry. I think we’ve got a very balanced and fair symposium,” he said.Thursday’s panels were set to look at the metabolic effects of fructose vs. glucose (fructose causes seven times more cell damage than glucose; glucose, also known as grape or blood sugar, is present in all carbohydrates, and in excess can be fatal to diabetics), the development of sweet taste preferences in childhood, and possible “interventions” for sweetened beverage consumption. The industry calls them SSBs. You know them as sugar-sweetened beverages, and they’re one of the many ways that an overload of sugar enters the average person’s diet. They were just one of the sugar-coated problems addressed when health and science experts met at Harvard Medical School to discuss the effects of sugar — in all its forms, including the ubiquitous high-fructose corn syrup — on health and public policy.“How has the knowledge of the metabolic effects of sugar affected policy? What gaps are there in our knowledge of dietary intake of sugar? And, what is the real effect of sweeteners on us? We are trying to identify gaps in our knowledge and inform a policy to move ahead and improve public health,” Harvard Medical School (HMS) Professor of Medicine Steven Grinspoon said before Wednesday’s and Thursday’s symposium, which he co-organized.Giving the keynote speech at 19th annual Harvard Nutrition and Obesity Symposium, “Epidemilogic, Physiologic, and Policy Considerations of the Sugar Epidemic,” Duke University Professor Kelly Brownell addressed the gap between scientific research and its impact on policy. “You can liken it to a relay race: We think that our work will have the magical effect of someone picking it up from us. But we’re really bad at passing the baton,” he said.Brownell called for a new model of “strategic research” that would target scientific work at “change agents” such as legislators, courts, the press, the public, and the food industry. As an example of how this can work, he said when fast-food restaurants were required to post their menus’ calorie content and other nutritional information, the industry lobbied for an exemption for drive-through windows. Brownell, then at Yale University, parked outside a local McDonald’s and counted the number of drive-through customers, who seemed to outnumber those inside the restaurant. He then commissioned a formal study and found that drive-through accounted for 60 percent of fast-food business. As a result of his study, the exemption was denied.,Another case involved misleading labeling, the speakers said, was when in 2009, the food industry launched a “smart choices” label for food packaging, which touted that a given product was high in nutritional value. The problem, Brownell said, was that the industry made these determinations itself. Though the American Society of Nutrition had a grant to administer the program (and lend it legitimacy), it wasn’t making the selections.“It was very self-serving,” Brownell said. “For example, the cereal industry had tough guidelines for salt, and pretty lax ones for sugar,” which meant that even a sugar-heavy cereal like Cocoa Krispies could go out with a “smart choices” label.Knowing he couldn’t directly confront the industry, Brownell instead contacted Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal, who sent letters to the nutrition society asking for records of how the products were vetted and what criteria were used.“If he’d contacted the food companies, they would have just taken time and stalled it. But societies are less used to hearing from attorneys general,” Brownell said.Blumenthal’s letters dovetailed with a New York Times article that criticized the “smart choices” program, and the combination of the article and investigation turned public sentiment against the program. “Smart choices” was killed off only six weeks after it was introduced. The average American consumes 22 teaspoons of added sugar a day and sodas are not the only culprits, according to event co-organizer Frank Hu. The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

Read More »

Dairy Waste Management

first_imgRemote-controlled boats could be a valuable tool for helping Georgia dairymen recycle waste on their farms, according to University of Georgia animal and dairy scientists.Every day, dairy farmers must clean and maintain cattle barns, which includes washing out the manure that accumulates daily. This manure is sent to a lagoon located on-site, where it is stored before it is spread on fields as fertilizer. Over time, the solids in the waste settle to the bottom of the lagoon. This waste cannot be used as nutrient-rich fertilizer if the lagoon isn’t stirred up or agitated periodically. The remote-controlled boats, however, contain high-volume pumps that can stir up that water before it’s transferred to a field.“The agitation boats can suspend the solid manure at the bottom of your lagoon up into the liquid, so you can get the nutrients that are stored in the bottom of your lagoon up into suspension and delivered out onto your soils,” said Melony Wilson, a UGA animal waste management specialist based in Athens, Georgia. “Those are nutrient resources that these producers use to grow their crops. They grow crops, produce silage and feed it back to the cows. It’s the ultimate recycling process.”Wilson said a lagoon that’s properly maintained is designed to accumulate solids for five to 10 years and then needs to be agitated. Farmers need to agitate the solids out of the lagoon bottom in order to achieve better success with their lagoon and to increase storage capacity.“When the solids build up, you lose your storage capacity. Once you’re losing your storage capacity, you have to go in and get those solids stirred up and get them out of your lagoon, so you’ll have maximum storage capacity to hold all the nutrients that are still coming into the lagoon from your barns,” Wilson said.UGA animal and dairy scientist John Bernard said that agitation boats are more effective at stirring up the solids at the bottom of lagoons than standard static pumps, which are widely used.“These boats will get out to all areas of the lagoon. They have high-capacity pumps to agitate the solids and get them in suspension. Then, we can pump them out and have a more uniform product when it’s being applied out on land,” Bernard said.The two UGA scientists stress the importance of knowing how manure flows in fields based on the farmer’s tillage practice. Tillage makes a substantial difference in how the nutrients move and how they settle into the ground.“Our goal with nutrient management is to get those nutrients into the soil profile to grow the crops. It doesn’t do any good to put it out here and let a rainstorm cause the nutrients to run off into the nearest ditch. That causes water quality problems,” Wilson said.Wilson and Bernard are part of the Animal Waste Awareness in Research and Extension (AWARE) team of scientists. The AWARE team consists of experts in a variety of areas related to animal waste management, environmental regulations, agricultural economics, crop and soil science, water quality and agricultural pollution prevention.For more information on how to safely manage animal waste on farms, visit aware.uga.edu.last_img read more

Read More »

Flags to be lowered to half staff Friday to Monday in Vermont to honor Brian Bill

first_imgThe Vermont State House, all federal and state facilities around the state and public buildings and grounds around the state will lower their flags to half staff from Friday to Monday, per order of Governor Peter Shumlin, to honor Chief Petty Officer Brian Bill, 31, of Virginia Beach, VA, who died on August 6, 2011, while serving with the United States Navy in Afghanistan. He was a graduate of Norwich University in Northfield, Vermont. Where the flags will be lowered:The Vermont State House, all Federal and State Facilities around the state and public buildings and grounds around the state. Which flags will be lowered:The U.S flag, Vermont State flag, POW flags, and any other flag* Date the flags are to be lowered: (at sunrise):          Friday, August 19, 2011 Date flags are to return to full staff: (at sunset):          Monday, August 22, 2011Name of person being honored/Reason to Lower Flag(s):         Chief Petty Officer Brian Bill, 31, of Virginia Beach, VA, died on Saturday, August 6, 2011 while serving his country with the United States Navy in Afghanistan. The Chief Petty Officer was a graduate of Norwich University in Northfield, Vermont. A mass of Christian burial will be held on Friday, August 19, 2011, at 11 am at the Church of St Cecilia, 1184 Newfield Avenue, Stamford, CT 06905  * all flags must fly at half-staff for that period of time. Rule: when the U.S. flag is lowered, the Vermont flag, the POW flag, and any other flag must also be lowered, because the U.S. flag must always fly above or equal to any other flags that are flown.last_img read more

Read More »

Daily Dirt: BRP Pinched, Pocahontas Ride Center Boosted

first_imgBlue Ridge Parkway Feeling the PinchThe Blue Ridge Parkway is one of the iconic mountain roads in the U.S., attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors a year to it’s scenic vistas. But the ribbon of National Park Service land that snakes along the southern Appalachians is not just for Harleys, RVs, and station wagons; cyclists love the steeps, hikers and mountain bikers love the access to trails, and nature enthusiasts love the wildlife and natural beauty. It is becoming harder and harder, however, to enjoy all the BRP has to offer as sequestration budget cuts have slashed amenities along the route, closing campgrounds and allowing other infrastructure to crumble or become over grown. Karen Chavez of the Citizen-Times takes a comprehensive look at the actual, physical damage budget cuts have brought to the park, from a reduction in seasonal staff – mostly educational – to mowing challenges along the 500 mile length. The numbers are staggering.Richmond Ride Center Gets BoostIn anticipation of the 2015 World Cycling Championships, Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell will accept a major donation toward the development of an International Mountain Bicycling Association Ride Center at Pocahontas State Park. The ceremony will take place tomorrow, July 9th, at 2 pm, and local riders are encouraged to bring their bikes for a trail ride following the ceremony. The Pocahontas Ride Center will be made up primarily by the James River Park system trails in the city of Richmond and the trails of Pocahontas State Park in Chesterfield County. There are only 11 other designated IMBA Ride Centers in the world, including one in Harrisonburg, Va., so this will be quite the honor for Virginia and Richmond. McDonnell will accept a check for $50,000 that matches state funding for the project and the ceremony will be a kick-off event for a larger fundraising effort. So get out and ride Richmond!Speaking of Virginia biking, a new cycling event will make its debut this year in the Old Dominion. The first annual Gran Fondo Virginia is slated for September 8, 2013 and will benefit the Better World Betty.Boston, Beyond the Finish LineThe New York Times has the saga of Jeff Bauman, who was waiting to see his girlfriend finish her first marathon when his legs were blown off by the bombs that shook the city and the U.S. You may recognize Bauman as the man from the iconic photo from that day, the one of the young man in the wheelchair holding his legs flanked by the man in the cowboy hat (Carlor Arredondo). The focus of the piece is the aftermath of that day, and the long road to recovery for Bauman. Bring the tissues, but this long read is worth it.last_img read more

Read More »

Blue Ridge Outdoors Top Towns Nominee: Lexington, Virginia

first_imgYou will be hard-pressed to find a better getaway destination than Lexington, Virginia. With adjacent public lands like the Jefferson National Forest and Moore’s Creek State Forest, Lexington harbors opportunity for everything from hiking, camping, and fly-fishing to whitewater paddling and Blue Ridge biking. For fly fishing and whitewater head to the Goshen Pass of the Maury River. Virginia’s oldest state managed natural area, the Goshen Pass is carved by a three mile portion of the Maury, nearly all of which runs alongside route 39 where class III and IV rapids are commonplace during periods of normal flow. This portion of the Maury also boasts the river’s best trout habitat thanks to yearly stockings during the months of October, November, December, January, and February. Cudas_IB_0814_2Did you know? The seven-mile Chessie Nature Trail connects Lexington to the town of Beuna Vista, Virginia.Vote now at blueridgeoutdoors.com!last_img read more

Read More »

Outdoor Updates: Clothing company Patagonia raises millions for outdoor organizations

first_imgThe N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission announced changes to its hunting, inland fishing and trapping licenses that will go into effect on January 1, 2020. The changes include: Owl lived in Georgia family’s Christmas tree for weeks before discovery  Patagonia plans to keep the donation period open until December 31, though they reached their $10 million pledge goal early on December 15. To date, Patagonia has donated more than $110 million to environmental nonprofits.  The family left their doors and windows open that night hoping the owl would leave the house on its own. When it remained, they got in touch with Chattahoochee Nature Center, which advised to leave some raw chicken out for the owl. An employee of the nature center stopped by the following day and caught the owl, putting it in a crate in a darkened room. At dusk that evening, the family put the crate outside and the owl escaped into the darkness. All licenses that authorize inland fishing will now include the trout privilege. Minor license fee adjustments based on the Consumer Price Index. A family in Georgia brought home more than they bargained for when they bought a Christmas tree from a store a few days after Thanksgiving. Katie McBride Newman and her two children were finishing dinner one evening when her daughter, India, 10, exclaimed that an ornament on the tree had scared her. Newman is a fan of owls and has about a dozen owl ornaments on the tree, so she assumed India was upset over one of those. But when she went to check out the tree, she discovered a real owl perched in the branches. What’s more, it had likely been there for over a week.center_img The outdoor apparel company Patagonia has raised over $10 million in donations for environmental organizations in the US and Europe in just over two weeks. The company is matching those donations, giving a total gift of $20 million to 1,043 grassroots environmental nonprofit organizations. Donations were made through Patagonia Action Works, a platform that connects the public with local grassroots organizations. Clothing company Patagonia raises millions for outdoor organizations All hunting and trapping licenses, with a few exceptions, will include the game lands privilege. Establishes a new Resident Lifetime Trapping license. N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission announces changes to licenses and feeslast_img read more

Read More »

Papuan protesters sentenced to less than one year for treason amid calls to drop charges

first_imgA court in East Kalimantan found seven Papuans guilty of treason in separate trials on Wednesday for their involvement in antiracism protests in Jayapura, Papua, in 2019, despite calls from human rights defenders for authorities to drop all charges against them.The Balikpapan District Court sentenced Buchtar Tabuni, an executive of pro-Papuan independence group United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMWP), to 11 months of imprisonment.Meanwhile, Cenderawasih University student union head Ferry Kombo as well as Irwanus Uropmabin and Hengki Hilapok, both students of the University of Science and Technology (USTJ), were sentenced to 10 months in prison. The punishment handed down by the court was far from the demands of prosecutors, who sought 17 years of imprisonment for Buchtar, 10 years for Ferry and 5 years for both Irwanus and Hengki.Two other defendants in the case, namely Agus Kossay and Stevanus Itlay from the National Committee of West Papua (KNPB), were sentenced to 11 months of imprisonment after prosecutors had demanded 15 years.Meanwhile, USTJ student union head Alexander Gobai was sentenced to 10 months in prison. The prosecutors had sought 10 years of imprisonment for him.“We are given a week to think about whether we will file an appeal or not. We will discuss further with the seven political prisoners and figure out if they can accept [the verdicts],” Emanuel Gobay, one of the defense lawyers, told The Jakarta Post on Wednesday. The seven students and activists were involved in Jayapura protests in August last year following a racially charged incident targeting Papuan university students living in a dormitory in Surabaya, East Java. The students were physically and verbally attacked by security personnel and members of local mass organizations, who accused them of refusing to celebrate Indonesia’s 74th Independence Day.Security personnel reportedly banged on the dormitory’s door while shouting insults like “monkeys”, “pigs” and “dogs”.The protests in Jayapura started out peacefully but later turned violent, resulting in dozens of injuries and several buildings being damaged. The seven activists were arrested in Jayapura and were moved for trials in Balikpapan earlier this year for security reasons.The trials have been met with outcry from the public and from activists, with many demanding that authorities drop all charges, as they argued that the Papuans involved in the rallies had only been exercising their right to protest racism against them.Over the past three days prior to the verdicts scheduled for Wednesday, rallies carried out by students and young people demanding the defendants’ release took place in various cities across the country.Human rights activists have lambasted the arrests and charges against the Papuans, saying that acts of treason and reactions against racism were two different things.They also argued that perpetrators of racism against Papuans, including hoax spreaders and verbal attackers, had been charged with less than a year of imprisonment.“Despite the leniency, the verdicts still reflect racism under Indonesia’s justice system. No matter what happens, West Papuans ‘must’ be found guilty by Indonesian courts, especially in treason and incitement cases,” Indonesian human rights lawyer Veronica Koman said in her Twitter account.Veronica told the Post that, during the antiracism protests last year, 86 Papuans were arrested and charged with treason. Some were immediately released, leaving 56 to be processed legally.Some of the 56 Papuans have been sentenced to prison and recently been released, including Surya Anta and Ariana Elopere, who were spotted among the crowd during Monday’s rally in front of the Supreme Court building in Central Jakarta.“There was no political intervention, because those who are now released have fully served their sentences,” Veronica said, adding that 23 of 36 Papuans still being detained would face their first hearing in Fakfak, West Papua, later this week.Amnesty International Indonesia executive director Usman Hamid said he deeply regretted the court rulings on Wednesday against the seven Papuans engaging in peaceful protests, arguing that such a decision showed that the state failed to uphold human rights for Papua.“Although the verdicts were much lighter than the demand of prosecutors, the seven prisoners of conscience should not have been arrested, imprisoned and prosecuted from the start. They should be released will all charges dropped,” Usman said in a statement.“In the era of president BJ Habibie, East Timorese political prisoners or prisoners of conscience were released. President Jokowi himself even freed five Papuan prisoners of conscience at the beginning of his first term,” he said.Editor’s note: This article has been updated with the verdicts handed down by the court against three other defendants. An earlier version of this article also misspelled the name of Cenderawasih University student union head. He is Ferry Kombo, not Gombo.Topics :last_img read more

Read More »