Rugby Book Review – Captain in the Cauldron

first_imgOr perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. John Smit being held back by members of the Lions teamTHERE’S STILL a bit more petrol in his tank and John Smit hopes to make this year’s World Cup, which makes the timing of his autobiography surprising. Maybe he couldn’t wait any longer to have a go at Luke Watson, whose presence in South Africa’s squad was the reason, says Smit, why the Springboks struggled in the 2008 Tri-Nations. The issue is covered in a provocatively named chapter called Killing the Cancer.If Watson gets both barrels, the most gripping material centres on Kamp Staaldraad, the 2003 World Cup training camp that led to humiliating TV footage of the players and the suicide of video analyst Dale McDermott, who leaked the tapes. You will probably read the chapter with your mouth agape: strip searches, vicious boxing bouts, chicken slaughtering, water torture, sleep and food deprivation… anything went. Neil de Kock even had a gun pointed at him just for looking for a box of matches.Having watched Joe van Niekerk make a hash of killing a chicken, Smit ripped the head off another live bird, covering himself in blood. But he emerged stronger for the experience and went on to join the elite band of World Cup-winning captains, his speech during the hairy 2007 quarter-final against Fiji epitomising the composure befitting great leaders.Beating the Lions almost completed a full set for Smit – the 2007 Super 14 final haunts him to this day – and he pulls no punches on Geech’s squad. “The more they whined, the more we laughed at them,” he writes. And if Mike Phillips is reading this, he thinks you’re an idiot!It’s a spicier read than you might expect from a national captain.RW RATING 4/5 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Book Review BUY AT:  keo.co.za (postage to UK is R100, about £8.40) RRP:  R225 (£19)  PUBLISHER:  Highbury Safika MediaGot a rugby book or DVD you’d like us to review in the Armchair Zone? Email [email protected] article appeared in the March 2010 issue of Rugby World MagazineDo you want to buy the issue of Rugby World in which this article appeared? Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipclast_img read more

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Phil Waugh ends career with a loss

first_imgAUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND – JUNE 24: Phil Waugh of the Waratahs talks to his team during the final Super Rugby qualifier match between the Blues and the Waratahs at Eden Park on June 24, 2011 in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Hannah Johnston/Getty Images) Phil Waugh looks on in disappointmentThe HSBC Waratahs gallant 2011 campaign has come to a close after going down to the Blues 26-13 in their Super Rugby Qualifier at Eden Park, Auckland.In a season where a record 38 players pulled on the state colours, the HSBC Waratahs put up a brave fight to qualify for the playoffs, but were ultimately disappointed not to progress past the first week of the Finals Series.It was a sad farewell for the state’s most capped player, captain Phil Waugh, who finishes his career with a record 136 appearances for New South Wales.While there was little rain throughout the night, a wet week in Auckland meant the game was played in slippery conditions and territory was king. After both sides had their chances in the opening exchanges, Tom Carter carried defenders over the line to score his sixth try of the season – equal highest for the Waratahs with Drew Mitchell – for an early lead.However the Blues hit back soon after through Lachie Munro, with Luke McAlister’s conversion edging the home side ahead after 24 minutes. At the 30 minute mark Kurtley Beale kicked a conversion to push the Waratahs in front by a point, however two three-pointers from Munro in the following five minutes gave the hosts a 13-8 lead at the break.The Waratahs’ injury curse continued after half-time with Kane Douglas and Sitaleki Timani both forced off the field with leg injuries, and Munro’s third penalty took the margin out further. In the 63rd minute some good lead up work led to Ali Williams’ try, with Munro’s conversion taking the lead to 23-8. Lachie Turner’s try in the 74th minute reduced the gap to ten points and an outside chance of victory, however a long range penalty to McAlister two minutes from time sealed the result.Blues 26 (Lachie Munro, Ali Williams tries; Lachie Munro 3 pens, con, Luke McAlister con, pen)Waratahs 13 (Tom Carter, Lachie Turner tries; Kurtley Beale pen) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS HT: Blues 13-8. Referee: Chris Pollock (NZL).By the clock18th – Tom Carter try; Kurtley Beale missed conversion. HSBC Waratahs 5-024th – Lachie Munro try; Luke McAlister conversion. Blues 7-531st – Kurtley Beale penalty goal. HSBC Waratahs 8-733rd – Lachie Munro penalty goal. Blues 10-836th – Lachie Munro penalty goal. Blues 13-851st – Lachie Munro missed penalty attempt56th – Lachie Munro penalty goal. Blues 16-863rd – Ali Williams try; Lachie Munro conversion. Blues 23-874th – Lachie Turner try; Kurtley Beale missed conversion. Blues 23-1378th – Luke McAlister penalty goal. Blues 26-13last_img read more

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What’s in the latest issue of Rugby World?

first_img Drink up! England’s George Kruis celebrates with the Six Nations trophy. Photo: Getty Images A full list of contents for Rugby World’s May edition – a celebration of England’s Six Nations Grand Slam The latest issue of Rugby World celebrates England’s Six Nations Grand Slam triumph, as well as that of Wales U20, and looks at where all six countries stand ahead of the summer tours. On top of that expert analysis, we have exclusive interviews with the likes of George Kruis, Rhys Webb, John Barclay and Andrew Trimble.Plus, as the Olympics near ever closer, we meet a player chasing glory with Brazil and get the lowdown on the Vancouver Sevens. Stephen Jones lays out his plan to make rugby safer, Nick Evans looks at the different skill levels between the northern and southern hemisphere, and we chart Richmond’s rise back to the upper echelons of English rugby.Here’s a full list of contents – find out where to buy your copy here or you can download the digital edition here.NEWSWhat’s next for the Grand Slammers? We look ahead to England’s summer tour and Wales’ assault on the U20 World Cup. Plus, your views on shaking up the Six Nations, Jake Ball on Judgement Day IV, 30 Minutes with England Women’s hooker Amy Cokayne, Hotshots and moreCOLUMNISTSPaul Grayson – The 2003 Grand Slam winner gives his verdict on the Class of 2016The Secret Player – Our former pro reveals what post-tournament celebrations are likeNick Evans – Harlequins’ Kiwi fly-half on the North v South debateSPOTLIGHTSJack Nowell – The Six Nations-winning wing is now chasing trophies with the ChiefsAndrew Trimble – The winger ponders recent ups and downs with Ulster and IrelandStep up: Andrew Trimble in Six Nations action against Scotland. Photo: Getty ImagesPeter Horne – Scotland’s versatile back talks sports, spices and speed of thoughtBradley Davies – The lock explains why he loves the attacking style of Wasps and WalesFEATURESSix Nations review – Former England fly-half Stuart Barnes gives his verdict on the Grand Slam and the state of play in all six countriesGeorge Kruis – Find out how England’s lineout master almost slipped through the netIreland – We assess what the future looks like for both the national team and the provincesJohn Barclay – Why the Scarlets flanker is making the most of his latest Scotland chance Rhys Webb – We get to know what the Wales scrum-half is like on and off the pitchBack in the groove: Rhys Webb returned to the Wales line-up last month. Photo: Getty ImagesHow to make rugby safer – Our columnist Stephen Jones addresses the ‘no tackling in schools’ debate and puts forward a plan to reduce rugby’s risksChampions Cup – Who stood out in the stats stakes during the European pool stages?Richmond – We catch up with the club as they bid for promotion to the ChampionshipBrazil – Meet the multi-talented Brazil Sevens player Juliano FioriVancouver Sevens – Find out how the new Canada leg of the HSBC World Sevens Series wentREGULARSClub focus – A round-up of news from grass-roots clubs across the country as well as exclusive interviews with Scotland Sevens star Jamie Farndale and Ireland Women’s icon Lynne CantwellJump to it: Will Scotland’s Jamie Farndale make it into Team GB? Photo: Getty ImagesEssentials – Book reviews and new products on the rugby marketUncovered – Exeter’s Thomas Waldrom on fitness, athletics and the Chiefs’ ‘Cookie Club’Tour Tale – Lineout calls go awry in CanadaADVICEPro Insight – Worcester defence coach Simon Cross explains how to increase your line speedNutrition – Former Ireland scrum-half Peter Stringer serves up a nutritious salmon dishFitness – Exercises to help you rip the ball like a proPro Playbook – A high-tempo attack move from Harlequins’ Brian Holland LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight Mini Rugby – Play breakout tag rugby and learn how to take and giveFor the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

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FREE 2018 calendar with the new Rugby World!

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight WHOOP WHOOP! The new issue of Rugby World comes with a FREE 2018 calendar celebrating the game’s record breakers – think of it as an early Christmas present from us! On top of that we have all you need to make the most of rugby’s festive season as well as an in-depth investigation into whether player migration is destroying the game. Here are ten reasons why you should pick up a copy of the January 2018 edition…1. FREE 2018 CALENDARStart planning next year’s adventures with your FREE calendar, which features superb photos of 12 rugby record-breakers as well as key dates in 2018.2. THE GREAT MIGRATIONThe focus of Alan Dymock’s latest in-depth investigation is player movement. With more and more rugby players navigating the globe to play the game, there are plenty of success stories but also reasons for concern. He speaks to players and administrators about the positives and the pitfalls across eight pages – and keep an eye out for case studies on rugbyworld.com too.FIND OUT HOW TO DOWNLOAD THE DIGITAL ISSUE HERE3. A VERY RUGBY CHRISTMASMake the most of rugby’s festive season with out gift guide – present ideas for the rugby-loving folk in your life – and a preview of the big games over the festive season.4. A DOZEN WISHES FOR 2018RW columnist Stephen Jones lays out 12 radical steps to shake up the game next year and beyond, from South Africa joining the European international scene to bars closing at rugby grounds during matches.Raise a glass: Dylan Hartley lifts the Cook Cup after England’s win over Australia. Photo: Getty Images5. ENGLAND CAPTAIN DYLAN HARTLEYThe England and Northampton hooker talks phones, phobias and family in our offbeat Q&A – and reveals the nickname Eddie Jones has for him! Ten reasons why you need to pick up a copy of Rugby World’s January 2018 editioncenter_img 6. JAPAN 2019It’s less than two years until the World Cup kicks off in Japan and RW has visited Yokohama Country & Athletic Club to  find out what rugby is like at a grass-roots level in the country.Plane sailing: Tom Brown and Stuart McInally at Fife Airport. Photo: Robert Perry7. FLYING WITH AN EDINBURGH DUOScotland hooker Stuart McInally already has his private pilot’s licence while his Edinburgh team-mate Tom Brown is close to completing the process too. So RW headed to Fife to take to the skies with the pair – find out what happened in this issue.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HERE8. GET TO KNOW TADHG BEIRNEHe’s been a standout performer for the Scarlets since arriving in 2016 as a relative unknown and will head to Munster next season in a bid to win Ireland honours. We find out more about the lock, including how he almost quit the game 18 months ago!Run free: Ireland’s Jacob Stockdale en route to scoring against Argentina. Photo: Getty Images9. IRELAND WING JACOB STOCKDALEThe Ulsterman has been in superb form for province and country this season. He tells RW’s Alan Pearey why life is surreal right now and what keeps him busy off the field.10. INSIDE THE MIND OF GAVIN HENSONThe fly-half is guiding a developing Dragons team in the Guinness Pro14 this season and he opens up on life at the region, his plans post-rugby and the importance of nutrition. Eyes on prize: Gavin Henson has been key for the Dragons this season. Photo: Getty ImagesPLUS, THERE’S ALL THIS…Former Test fly-half Charlie Hodgson offers his verdict on the current England set-up and picks his starting XV for the 2019 World Cup.Sean Holley looks at Leinster’s defensive structure in The Analyst.Leicester centre Matt Toomua gives his top tips on how to exploit space in midfield.Cardiff Blues players and coaches pay tribute to Taufa’ao Filise, the prop still going strong at 40, in Club Hero.Former Wales centre Matthew J Watkins explains what it’s like to live with cancer.The Secret Player gives an insight into what it’s like to be a pro rugby player during the Christmas period.Get to know rising stars Cai Evans, son of Iuean, and Abigail Dow, who scored a brace on her England debut last month.Ben Ryan gives his thoughts on why kicking is becoming more prevalent this season.Ali Donnelly reports on how South Africa are rebuilding their women’s programmes from the bottom up.Grass-roots news in our club section.last_img read more

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Social Media Round-up 2018-19 Season: Week Four

first_imgLast minute tries and intense disagreements on England’s squad selections, take a look at our wrap up of Twitter action from this past week. The Bristol Bears were also in a nail-biting affair against Harlequins. Up 20-13 with 15 minutes left, the pressure was clearly getting to the entire club as shown by their tweet below! (As it would turn out, Bristol managed to hold on to the victory by the same scoreline). | @Harlequins win a penalty in the middle of the park and Lang kicks well to the corner.But the m lineout is… [email protected] clears past the . Tense. 20-13 #BRIvHAR pic.twitter.com/Kn6dhqxJA9— Bristol Bears (@BristolBears) September 22, 2018Shifting to the Pro14, Justin Tipuric scored a sublime solo try in his Osprey’s match-up against Benetton. — Nigel Owens MBE (@Nigelrefowens) September 23, 2018Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter for all the latest rugby news. Eddie Jones’ reason for leaving Danny Cipriani out of the England squad was based on “form”.In that case, the first person he should have kicked to the curb is himself.#rugbyunited @RugbyEng— #RUGBYSTIG (@rugbystig) September 23, 2018Several rugby fans acknowledged that Jones claims to be picking the squad on form, and yet the undefeated Exeter Chiefs, have only three players selected to the squad (though Ben Moon was later called into the squad). Simon Zebo and Finn Russell doing bad deeds over in France! pic.twitter.com/ZBiJM9PTi2— Pat McCarry (@patmccarry) September 23, 2018In international rugby, The Rugby Championship starts again this upcoming weekend with New Zealand going up against Argentina and South Africa hosting the Wallabies. In fact the Springboks welcomed the Wallabies into Port Elizabeth ahead of their potentially crucial matchup in a brilliant act of sportsmanship. Eddie Jones’ Squad Selections Continue To Divide OpinionEngland head-coach Eddie Jones recently announced his 36-man wider training squad and he has caused considerable controversy by leaving out fly-half Danny Cipriani. Jones claims he is the third or fourth choice ten and has been left out because of form. Twitter responded mainly by criticising the decision. Out: Danny Cipriani has been left out of England’s training squad (Getty Images) Exeter Chiefs – currently 4 from 4 in the league, champions & runners up over last 2 seasons, contribute just 3 players to the England training squad.Do Exeter have an image problem, still seen as a small team, style clash with EJ’s way of playing? Why so few players chosen?— rugby (@theblitzdefence) September 22, 2018Regardless of Jones’s decisions, rugby battle continued this weekend in the Gallagher Premiership and Guinness Pro 14 with Cipriani, along with other absentees Don Armand and Sam Simmonds, all in action for their respective clubs.Simmonds in particular dusted off the disappointment by scoring two tries in Exeter’s 24-17 victory over Newcastle Falcons. @ThomasCollins13 pic.twitter.com/2EV2P0X3RB— Northampton Saints (@SaintsRugby) September 22, 2018However the missed conversion by fly-half Dan Bigger cost his team the chance to escape with a draw. The final score was 17-15 to Bath. | FULL TIME in South Africa and it’s finished in a stalemate after a last gasp try from @UlsterRugby! Billy Burns nailed the conversion under extreme pressure.A good steal for Ulster as both sides share the points as well as a bonus point each!CHE 39-39 ULS#GuinnessPRO14 pic.twitter.com/qy5fNhviZQ— Premier Sports (@PremierSportsTV) September 21, 2018Simon Zebo also continues to tear up the Top 14, picking up another two tries for Racing 92. This week his side beat Castres 27-11 and he currently is tied for top try-scorer in the competition with Stade Francais back Gael Fickou. They both have five tries already.One of his tries was set up beautifully by Finn Russell as you can see below; LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Feel very lucky to have had the opportunity to play alongside all the guys yesterday. #COYW @WorcsWarriors pic.twitter.com/CZcjv1PMtL— Ted Hill (@Ted_Hill26) September 24, 2018Northampton Saints also scored a last-minute try against Bath, With Tom Collins the man crossing the line. Let’s not get too carried away with who has and hasn’t been picked by Eddie Jones for the @EnglandRugby training squad. That won’t be the squad announced for the Autumn Internationals and he loves plying mind games! @DannyCipriani87 is England’s best 10 fact!— Andy Goode (@AndyGoode10) September 20, 2018 Ti lwcus o ni wedi misso. Your lucky i missed ha. Thanks for the water Thanks to the @Springboks for welcoming us to Port Elizabeth. See you on at @NMB_Stadium on Saturday night. #RSAvAUS #GoldBlooded pic.twitter.com/RtjUXA90f0— Qantas Wallabies (@qantaswallabies) September 24, 2018And finally, on a humorous note, Nigel Owens, after taking a drink, decided to spray a water-boy when he had finished. The boy has since promised revenge although according to Owens, he missed the young lad anyway! | Great try here from Justin TipuricThe versatile no.7 makes the break in midfield, chips through, and finishes it off himself OSP 17-3 BEN#GuinnessPRO14 pic.twitter.com/hA1IiUwyQe— Premier Sports (@PremierSportsTV) September 22, 2018Ulster managed to secure a dramatic draw with the South Africa based Cheetahs this weekend. Henry Speight scored the crucial try as time expired and with the last kick of the game Billy Burns nailed the conversion to share the points in Bloemfontein. The flood of @samsimmonds_ tries continues How likely is the @ExeterChiefs man to finish top scorer? #GallagherPremCatch all the weekend highlights on @channel5_tv on Monday. pic.twitter.com/XkCkUsywhX— Premiership Rugby (@premrugby) September 23, 2018Whilst Exeter are flourishing at the moment, Leicester Tigers are going in the opposite direction. A week after a tough loss to Wasps, the Tigers looked to get back on track as they welcomed Worcester to Welford Road. However they were once again on the losing side thanks to a last-minute try scored by Worcester’s Ted Hill. Biggar hits the post from the touchline — Northampton Saints (@SaintsRugby) September 22, 2018last_img read more

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Hotshot: Northampton Saints centre Fraser Dingwall

first_imgThis midfield man has been training with Eddie Jones’s England squad Show of strength: Fraser Dingwall scores a try for Northampton (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This article originally appeared in the June 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. When did you link up with Saints? When I was 13. I’ve gone right through – U16, U18 and senior academy.What about age-grade honours? center_img TAGS: Northampton Saints I didn’t get picked for Midlands U16, so I went down the Scottish Exiles route and captained Scotland U16, then played for the U18s the following year. The next year I played for England U18 and I had two years with the U20s.Is it England all the way now? It’s still very much up in the air. I want to play at the highest level I can.How did you find training with England in the Six Nations? A good learning experience. It was quite surreal but I was lucky to be part of that environment.BUY RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE ONLINEWhat would you like to have achieved in a year’s time? I’d like to have won silverware with Saints and to be included in next year’s Six Nations EPS.Who’s been the biggest influence on you? Can I name a few? Roddy Deans, my Scotland U16 coach; Barry Burgess and James Hinkins at Bedford School; Simon Sinclair, who pushed me through at Saints. And John Fletcher.What do you do away from rugby? I’m doing a part-time degree with the Open University in health sciences – it’s the closest thing I could do to biomedical science.I was going to study that at university but then the senior academy offer came in and I went down the rugby route. It’s good to have something to do off the pitch. I’m racing through it at the minute!RW VERDICT: He grew up admiring the feats of Dan Carter and is flourishing at Franklin’s Gardens thanks to another Kiwi, Chris Boyd. Averaging a try every three games for Northampton, Dingwall is already on Eddie Jones’s radar. Northampton Saints centre Fraser DingwallDate of birth 7 April 1999 Born Cambridge Position Centre Club Northampton Saints Country EnglandHow old were you when you starting playing? Six, at Cambridge RUFC. I also played at Bedford School.Did you play any other sports? A fair bit of football. Sometimes on a Sunday I’d play rugby in the morning and football in the afternoon. I kept playing both until I was 14.What positions have you played? I started as a fly-half and slowly moved wider, to 12 and then 13. I played a year at full-back at school too. I’d say 13 is my main position.What are your strengths? Probably my reading of the game, defensively more than attack. I’m naturally not the biggest so I’m working on my physicality.last_img read more

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Who is CJ Stander: Ten things you should know about the Ireland No 8

first_img Who is CJ Stander: Ten things you should know about the Ireland No 8Ireland back-row CJ Stander has become an integral part of the national squad since making his debut in 2016. There’s a lot more to find out about the Munster No 8 too…Ten things you should know about CJ Stander1. Christiaan Johan Stander was born on 5 April 1990 in George, South Africa. He plays for Ireland after qualifying on the three-year residency rule in November 2015.2. Stander was a champion discuss thrower in his teenage years where he lived, in South Africa’s Western Cape.3. He stands at 6ft 1in (185cm) tall and weighs 18st (114kg).4. He represented South Africa in the U20 Rugby World Cup in 2009 and 2010, finishing third in the tournament in both years.5. Stander wasn’t considered big enough to play for the Springboks unless he converted to hooker. Stander said of the situation: “I was told I was too small (to play loose forward) and that I should move to hooker as that was the only position where I would play international rugby.“I said to myself, ‘I’m not going to do this’. I just made the decision easy and said, ‘Well boys, I’ll pack up my stuff and leave’.”6. Stander moved to Munster in 2012 and made his 150th appearance for the province against Leinster in January 2021. Can’t get to the shops? Download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet. Subscribe to the print edition to get magazine delivery to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Facts and figures about the South Africa-born Munster back-rowercenter_img 7. Stander’s wife is Jean-Marie Neethling, the sister of Olympic gold medal-winning swimmer Ryk Neethling, and the couple have a daughter called Everli, who was born in 2019.Stander’s brother, Janneman, is also a rugby union player for South African team SWD Eagles.8. He made his Ireland debut against Wales in the 2016 Six Nations. At the end of that 2015-16 season, he won the Rugby Players Ireland Players’ Player of the Year and Supporters’ Player of the Year awards.9. Stander was named Limerick’s inaugural Honorary International Ambassador in 2017 by Mayor Kieran O’Hanlon.10. Stander was part of the 2017 British & Irish Lions squad for their tour of New Zealand. He played in seven games during the tour, including an appearance off the bench in the decisive third Test against the All Blacks. That match ended in a 15-15 draw, meaning the series was also drawn. CJ Stander qualified for Ireland on residency (Getty Images) last_img read more

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UK churches strive for an environmentally ‘green’ Christmas

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID [Ecumenical News International] As the concept of “going green” continues to gain traction among consumers and businesses, churches in the United Kingdom are using the Christmas season to highlight their role in improving the environment.In early December, St. Luke’s, a Catholic church in the London suburb of Pinner, switched on its solar panels, while the Anglican dioceses of Gloucester, Exeter, Bath, and Wells launched an ambitious project to provide “green” electricity for most of their 300 churches, 200 schools, and other institutions.“We want to take God’s gift of energy and offer it back in a way that does not damage the environment,” said Canon Adrian Slade of the Diocese of Gloucester.A number of other green initiatives were implemented by churches this Christmas season.“Don’t Stop at the Lights,” an Anglican handbook, provided material to help church leaders plan a year of environmental change in their communities, and offered themes that could be linked to services, as well as study materials on Biblical texts dealing with environmental concerns.Practical suggestions for Christmas mentioned in the handbook included decorating churches by using greenery from gardens rather than florists, creating home-made decorations and gifts, and lighting candles instead of using electric lights.The ecumenical campaign Operation Noah ran a “Reclaim Christmas” campaign advocating “putting the waiting back into wanting” throughout Advent, and urging people to buy less.An Operation Noah statement says “Advent was traditionally a period of penitence and quiet anticipation. But now it seems no more than four weeks of frenzied consumption in which stress, needless debt, and damage to God’s creation have become its defining hallmarks…Countless unwanted ‘gifts’ will end up, at best in the charity shops, and at worst, in the landfill. If Jesus returned at Christmas, what would he make of us doing all of this in His name?”The Climate Justice group at Our Lady Help of Christians in Kentish Town, north London, sold a book of vegetarian recipes collected from parishioners. “It’s much better for the environment not to eat meat, and the proceeds are going to support a community in Kenya who are being badly affected by climate change,” said member Bernadine Bishop.Church leaders also emphasized the green message this year. On Dec. 8, Pope Benedict turned on solar-powered lights adorning the world’s largest Christmas tree in a ceremony near Assisi, birthplace of St. Francis, the patron saint of environmentalists.“It is now clear that humankind has no productive future on earth if we do not educate everyone to be responsible for the creation,” said Benedict before the ceremony.Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams would seem to agree. In a statement referring to the Church of England’s environmental campaign, he said: “For the Church of the 21st century, good ecology is not an optional extra, but a matter of justice. It is therefore central to what it means to be a Christian.” Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET By Jo SiedleckaPosted Dec 28, 2011 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Environment & Climate Change Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC center_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA UK churches strive for an environmentally ‘green’ Christmas An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

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Episcopal Relief & Development offers 2012 Lenten meditations

first_imgEpiscopal Relief & Development offers 2012 Lenten meditations Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls [Episcopal Relief & Development] Episcopal Relief & Development is pleased to announce that both the print and electronic versions of its 2012 Lenten Meditations will be available in English and Spanish.  Co-authored by a group of Episcopal Church leaders from a variety of backgrounds and perspectives, this year’s devotional booklet focuses on how Christians can work to promote health and fight disease while preparing their own lives for healing during the Lenten season.“We are grateful to everyone who contributed to the 2012 Lenten Meditations,” said Brian Sellers-Petersen, Director of Church Engagement at Episcopal Relief & Development. “Each meditation provides a new and engaging way to think about health and healing in the context of Scripture and the season of Lent.”The English and Spanish devotional booklets, as well as additional Lenten materials such as prayer cards and hope chests, will be shipped from the Episcopal Media Center.  Orders should be placed by visiting www.EpiscopalMarketplace.org, calling 1.866.937.2772 or emailing [email protected]  In order to ensure delivery within the US by Ash Wednesday, February 26, all requests for items should be made by Friday, February 10.  For overseas orders, please allow extra time for your shipment to arrive.Downloadable Spanish and English versions of the meditations are available at Episcopal Relief & Development’s Lenten Resources web page at www.er-d.org/Lent/.  Readers can also sign up to receive them by email.  Each email will include both the English and Spanish text for that day.In 2009, Lent was officially designated as a time to encourage dioceses, congregations and individuals to remember and support Episcopal Relief & Development’s life-saving work. All Episcopalians are invited to join together on Episcopal Relief & Development Sunday, February 26, and throughout the Lenten season to pray for those who are impacted by poverty and disease worldwide.  Congregations may also consider dedicating a special offering toward the organization’s mission.“Since our Lenten theme is health and healing, we are encouraging churches to focus on how they can help promote health and fight disease on Episcopal Relief & Development Sunday and throughout the season,” Sellers-Petersen said. “One particular way they can do this is by joining the NetsforLife® Inspiration Fund campaign and inviting members to educate themselves about malaria and take action to prevent it.  By purchasing a $12 mosquito net, a single individual can help protect up to three people from this deadly disease, but a congregation working together could protect a whole community!”Complementary resources for Lent and Episcopal Relief & Development Sunday, including a bulletin insert, sermon notes and special prayers, are available at www.er-d.org/Lent/.To support Episcopal Relief & Development’s work, please visit www.er-d.org or call 1.855.312.HEAL (4325). Gifts can be mailed to Episcopal Relief & Development, PO Box 7058, Merrifield, VA 22116-7058.Episcopal Relief & Development is the international relief and development agency of the Episcopal Church and an independent 501(c)(3) organization. The agency takes its mandate from Jesus’ words found in Matthew 25.  Its programs work towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Episcopal Relief & Development works closely with the worldwide Church and ecumenical partners to help rebuild after disasters and to empower local communities to find lasting solutions that fight poverty, hunger and disease, including HIV/AIDS and malaria. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. 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Some dioceses want changes in denominational health plan

first_img Rector Collierville, TN March 20, 2012 at 2:29 pm Fairness to all church employees is a basic justice issue. The national debate on health care threatens to break down because basic health care for all may limit options for a few. Surely our church should stand with those who are disadvantaged on this issue. If congregations do not have the funds to properly compensate all their employees, then we all have the duty to advocate for the national plan that will include everyone. Adding our voices to the public discourse and search for solutions is part of our ministry now. March 23, 2012 at 7:06 pm Are you serious? That is your response to this issue? God help us! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL March 17, 2012 at 8:33 am I strongly support changes to this canon. To switch to this plan and include lay-clergy parity would cost our parish almost $48,000 in additional premiums in 2013 — for just 3 employees. We have a plan from a local agent with BCBS that has equivalent coverage and significantly lower premiums. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Kathryn Ryan says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 March 22, 2012 at 9:36 am As a General Convention Deputy, I am intrigued by the West Missouri Resolution instructing CPG to create a truly denominational health plan in which plans and costs would be the same throughout all of TEC, or at least the domestic USA dioceses. Such a system would, no doubt, still have net winners and losers in terms of which dioceses and congregations experience ups and downs in costs — that is inevitable with ANY change to the present scattershot system. But it would mean that everyone in TEC would be operating by the same set of rules and dealing with the same costs, as has long been the case with clergy pensions.I have read somewhere that the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America operates with such a denomination-wide system and have a vague (and, I hope, accurate) recollection that their denominational budget provides some premium assistance to financial-challenged Synods. CPG would do well to examine what our sisters and brothers in the ELCA are doing, how it might work in TEC and, just maybe, how TEC and the ELCA could partner in the challenging task for providing adequate and equitable health coverage for both clergy and laity. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR March 2, 2013 at 7:03 am The changes in the health plan will benefit the patients medical treatment a lot. March 20, 2012 at 2:31 pm Your figures expose a great inequality and puzzle. In another venue, I believe $48,000 might cover six employees. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 16, 2012 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rev. Adam Egan says: March 23, 2012 at 3:04 pm Obama care(s) for us all. In Obama we trust. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Susan Butler says: Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events Comments (9) Comments are closed. CatherinaLucy says: Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Jack Zamboni says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA March 30, 2012 at 1:33 am We are rapidly getting to the point where congregations may be able to pay a reasonable clergy salary but will not be able to pay the benefits. We are talking here about some very significant increases in medical costs in an economy that has yet to rebound. The G.C. has to be realistic about what congregations can bear. As my colleague, Stephanie Wethered, (from my former Diocese of Newark) stated, the inevitable result of mandating increases in this medical coverage will be reduction in the hours (and salaries) of both clergy and laity. In my opinion, this does not make much sense. In fact, it will hinder ministry in local congregations. At St. Michael’s Cathedral here in Boise, Idaho, I implemented a medical plan which was modeled after that of the Medical Trust. We worked with a local insurance broker, and customized the plan according to our needs. Our former bishop was absolutely opposed to it, until he saw how many thousands of dollars we were saving (yes, I said thousands for our seven full time staff.) In time, and with the guidance of a new bishop, our plan was implemented by the whole Diocese, and it saved them thousands of dollars. We need to have the ability to customize such plans, utilizing local resources, in order to effectively and creatively do the ministry to which we’ve been called. It’s a new ball game, folks. The new paradigm for effective ministry (including how we take care of our employees) involves more local flexibility in decision-making, not less. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI center_img Richard F Hicks says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC MB Valentine says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK March 29, 2012 at 10:08 pm I am intrigued by the notion that a truly denominational health plan would equalize costs over all dioceses. Unfortunately, there is no way to equalize medical benefits throughout the Episcopal Church, as the availability, quality and cost of treatment varies significantly from place to place. At the same time, so does the potential for growth in wealth, in population numbers, and in the various opportunities for mission and ministry. Though I understand and affirm the desire for just benefits for lay employees and for the cost savings that collective purchasing can achieve, I do not see how we can create a fair system (as proposed by the Diocese of West Missouri) by equalizing the cost for healthcare across the country, when there are so many other variables in the finances of carrying out mission and ministry. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL [Episcopal News Service] Concerned about the financial realities of implementing a denomination-wide health insurance plan, at least four Episcopal Church dioceses are formally asking the 77th meeting of General Convention this July to change the terms of the program that is to be implemented less than six months after convention adjourns.The Diocese of Central New York has filed a resolution with the General Convention office that would have the convention defer the Jan. 1, 2013, participation deadline for three years. The resolution would also allow those entities required by canon to participate to purchase health insurance from other providers besides the Episcopal Medical Trust, the Church Pension Fund affiliate that is designated to administer the program.The Diocese of Ohio has also proposed a resolution to the General Convention to remove the mandate that insurance be bought from the Medical Trust.The Diocese of North Carolina wants the General Convention to require a study of “the impact of full compliance with Resolution 2009-A177.” And, the resolution would have the convention not require any diocese to adopt the minimum cost-sharing guidelines for parity between clergy and lay employees called for in the plan until the study has been acted upon the next meeting of convention in 2015.The Diocese of West Missouri is asking that the implementation date be suspended and that the convention instruct the Medical Trust to create “a single, unified national plan for the entire Episcopal Church with no variance in premium costs from diocese to diocese, thereby eliminating dramatic cost differences for similar health insurance coverage between dioceses and regions of the Episcopal Church.”Other Episcopal dioceses have passed resolutions urging changes in the plan, but have not actually filed or planned to file accompanying “C resolutions” with the General Convention office as the other four have.In addition, the House of Bishops’ Bishops from the Small Dioceses group has asked CPF to consider a major change in the plan. The request came after CPF officials met with them in November 2011, according to CPF.“Although a single rate was not part of the resolution, at the request of the House of Bishops, the Medical Trust is studying the implications of a single rate on health benefit costs,” Frank Armstrong, Medical Trust senior vice president and general manager and Laurie Kazilionis, vice president for client relations, said in a written statement e-mailed to Episcopal News Service.Concerns directed at 2009 General Convention decisionThe concerns expressed are directed toward a decision General Convention made in July 2009 when, via Resolution A177, it told the Church Pension Fund to implement a denomination-wide health (DHP) plan by Jan. 1, 2013, with benefits to be provided through the Medical Trust. Part of the rationale for the decision was that such a plan would save money, mitigate inequities between lay and clergy employees and improve employees’ access to health insurance.On Jan. 1, dioceses, congregations (including cathedrals, parishes and missions) as well as certain official church agencies are required to provide health insurance benefits to all clergy and lay employees who work 1,500 hours (30 hours a week) or more per year in the church’s domestic dioceses (including Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands). Employees who work 20 hours or more a week may voluntarily participate according to guidelines their employers set.These requirements will not initiate a big change in many dioceses. As of January 2012, according to CPF, 93 of the church’s 101 domestic dioceses and 45 groups are enrolled in one of the 22 Medical Trust health plans offered under the DHP. Those enrollments were “based on the attractiveness of the product and price,” CPF said in the statement. Seventy-eight of those 93 dioceses have been with the Medical Trust since before 2009.Under the plan, dioceses make their own decisions about what Medical Trust health plans they offer, whether or not to offer domestic-partner healthcare benefits and whether its schools, daycare facilities, and other diocesan institutions are required to participate.The Medical Trust is what’s known as a self-funded church plan and is the provider of benefits through its partnerships with insurance providers such as Cigna, Kaiser, Aetna, United Healthcare, and Empire BlueCross BlueShield. It currently provides in-network access to 98 percent of covered Episcopal employees nationwide, according to CPF. The Medical Trust’s 22 different plan designs all include mental health, vision, an employee assistance program, and health advocacy benefits. Dental-care plans also are available.Employees can opt out if they have health benefits through an approved source such as a spouse’s or partner’s employment, military-service benefits or coverage from a former employer.Resolution A177 and the canon it enacted require that each diocese establish a cost-sharing policy that is the same for eligible clergy and lay employees. The policy determines the minimum amount that a congregation must contribute towards the monthly premium for eligible clergy and lay employees. The dioceses that have already instituted or formulated cost-sharing policies have chosen options ranging from mandating that employers pay the full cost of a specific plan to requiring all employees to pay a percentage of any plan or of a specific plan.Concern over the costs involved with implementing the DHP is exacerbated by the fact that the church also faces another deadline on Jan. 1, 2013. The 2009 General Convention also made it canonically mandatory for employers to enroll lay employees scheduled to work a minimum of 1,000 hours annually for any domestic Episcopal Church organization or body subject to the authority of the church in a CPF-sponsored lay employee pension plan. The exceptions are Episcopal employers that are providing lay pension benefits through an equivalent non-CPF-sponsored defined benefit plan and schools providing pension benefits through a TIAA-CREF defined contribution plan.Most employers of Episcopal Church clergy have been required since 1917 to pay assessments into CPF’s pension fund for priests. The current rate is 18 percent of the cleric’s total compensation package (salary, housing, utilities and Social Security tax reimbursement). The lay pension system will require a maximum nine percent contribution, depending on the plan chosen.CPF predicted in its feasibility report to the 2009 General Convention that the church as a whole could save $134 million in the first six years (beginning in 2013) after the fully implemented denominational health plan replaces the current voluntary and fragmented insurance system.Jim Morrison, CPF executive vice president and chief operating officer for risk bearing business, told ENS in the written statement that the denomination-wide plan, which is now only partially implemented ahead of the 2013 deadline, has already resulted in what he called “cumulative cost-containment,” i.e., savings over prevailing rates of more than eight percent or $34.5 million from 2010 through to the present. The Medical Trust was able to negotiate with vendors prior to the formal start of the DHP implementation process and thus added $2 million in savings in 2009 added. He said those savings have been passed through by way of lower annual rate increases for participating dioceses in 2009 through 2012.Armstrong and Kazilionis added that the Medical Trust is maximizing cost-containment through cross-denominational purchasing, “leveraging scale in vendor negotiations, and optimizing provider and pharmacy discounts.”Morrison compared the DHP’s performance to that of U.S. employers’ experience from 2010 to 2012, who he said saw health insurance premiums increase an average of eight percent to 12 percent annually, while the Medical Trust’s increases averaged only 5.5 percent to 5.8 percent annually during the same period.An example from one dioceseThe Diocese of Newark‘s experience in beginning to implement the DHP is in some ways illustrative of the concerns that dioceses are raising.The Bishop’s Advisory Committee on HR and Benefits in September proposed that Newark congregations be required to pay a minimum of 90 percent of the cost of single coverage for the average-priced plan offered. The proposal was met with strong resistance from diocesan clergy, who said the cost-sharing minimum essentially cut their salaries and could force them to pay even more to insure spouses or partners, and children.The Rev. Stephanie Wethered, rector of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Essex Fells, New Jersey, told ENS in an interview that it made “no business or moral sense” to her to require all diocesan clergy to face the potential of a salary and/or benefit reduction in order to ensure that a handful of parishes “do the right thing” and insure their eligible lay employees.St. Peter’s parish fully covers the cost of providing her and its four full-time lay employees with health, short-term disability and life insurance, pension benefits and a health savings account. She said the parish purchases its health insurance for less money outside of the Medical Trust and thus she opposes the mandate that participants purchase insurance via that agency.A plan to present the cost-sharing proposal at the diocese’s January convention was shelved in favor of a special convention on the issue June 9. In announcing the special convention, Bishop Mark Beckwith said that there are “some critical justice issues in providing parity of benefits for the clergy and laypeople who work for the church” and added that there are also “some significant financial realities that need to be considered.” He said the committee’s proposal had sought a balance between what he called “justice and financial reality.”Wethered told ENS that she is “heartened” by recent refinements the advisory committee has made to the proposal that will come to the special convention. While the 10 percent cost-sharing proposal is still on the table the group has proposed alternative ways to achieve parity in funding.In January, the annual diocesan convention asked General Convention delay the implementation deadline. The language echoed an October 2011 resolution in the Diocese of Olympia.Predictions of unintended consequencesThose advocating for changes in the plan not only worry that the ways dioceses set their cost sharing policies could result in an effective salary reduction to those whose benefits are currently fully paid by their employers, they also suggest that employers will choose the minimum standard as the maximum standard and employees would thus have their benefits reduced.“It’s incredibly naïve to think that [congregational leadership] wouldn’t use that mandate to free themselves of that burden” that the cost of health insurance places on budgets during “these really financially tough times,” Wethered said.Two members of the Diocese of East Carolina told ENS in a phone interview that A177 mandates are indeed financially burdensome. Monty Pollard of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Greenville, North Carolina “it’s not that we don’t care about our employees but it’s a dollars and cents thing” for congregations that are trying to be “disciplined” in managing their budgets.Dave Whichard said that in many members of their parish are not able to provide to their families the same level of coverage that the diocese says must be provided to the parish’s employees. “You’ve got to have some parity there, too, it seems to me,” he said.East Carolina’s convention has asked its deputation to General Convention to support efforts to postpone the implementation date and to make the plan “more truly denomination-wide, addressing such issues as the number of bands that establish the costs of such insurance and the lack of a single nation-wide pool of participants.”Back in Newark the Rev. Thomas Matthews, rector of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Phillipsburg, New Jersey, who listened to part of the A177 debate in 2009, said some dioceses’ implementation plans seem to be using the resolution’s mandates as “a reset button on how we cover clergy and laity all together.” He wants to see the 2012 meeting of General Convention stipulate that A177 was not meant to result in “reduction in [clergy] benefits as a way to extend benefits to laity.”The Diocese of Missouri specifically addressed that concern during its November 2012 convention by saying that employers in the diocese “shall not reduce existing coverage or increase the cost of existing coverage to employees to comply with A177.”Matthews and Wethered also suggested that, in Matthews’ words, “some lay people are going to have their hours decreased so that churches don’t have to pay for it” because they would then fall below the eligibility definition.“I may have to cut employees back because of these mandates and what a shame,” Wethered said.And, the Diocese of Texas has asked whether the church should change its approach to health insurance when the United States also is implementing insurance reform. Among the conclusions a task force spelled out in an October letter to the diocese was the suggestion that in July General Convention “seriously revisit” the denomination-wide health plan in light of both the “cost and complexity of the implementation” of the plan and the implications of federal health care reform. The task force suggested that the diocese hold off on making any decisions on coverage and contributions until after the July meeting of convention.CPF’s e-mailed statement to ENS said that the church will still need the DHP to assist in cost-containment efforts regardless of federal health care reforms. Armstrong and Kazilionis said that there are several specific provisions of the federal law that may impact the church. “We are working with other denominations through the Church [Benefits] Alliance to determine how groups participating in Medical Trust healthcare plans may be affected,” they said.They also acknowledged that issues “related to regional costs of living, salary standards, and benefit arrangements have always been a concern for the church” and they said the Medical Trust is “encouraging and facilitating communication at the diocesan leadership level to address this.”Morrison said in his e-mailed comments that CPF is “very sensitive to cost concerns around the church” and he acknowledged that the economic landscape had changed greatly since the feasibility study was conducted ahead of the 2009 meeting of General Convention.“We recognize that many dioceses, congregations, and church institutions are experiencing financial stress due to the state of the U.S. economy, which has declined since the last General Convention,” he said.In that same e-mailed statement, Morrison said he was “not sure how these resolutions will be received at General Convention, but as agents of the Episcopal Church, we will be supportive of the outcome, whatever it is.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rich Demarest says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Health & Healthcare Some dioceses want changes in denominational health plan Resolutions address costs, predicted impacts Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Susan Butler says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more

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