Retired EPD Detective Turned Author To Hold Fundraising Book Signing

first_imgAuthor Rick Reed will hold a book signing for his novel “The Cleanest Kill”.The signing is a fundraiser for the charitable 911 Gives Hope organization. Meet the author and purchase a copy of his book while enjoying coffee and mystery treats. The event takes place Saturday June 29, from 9:30 AM to 12:30 PM at the downtown Evansville Public Library in Browning Room A. This event is open to the public.After a 20-plus year in law enforcement, including a stint running Internal Affairs, Rick Reed retired from the Evansville Police Department and turned his attention to writing, creating the Detective Jack Murphy series. Each book in the fiction thriller series centers around Murphy working to solve a different crime that usually involves locations in and around Evansville. For example, in one of the books a (fictional) murder takes place behind Turley Jewelers in downtown Evansville, while another involves the former Kid’s Kingdom playground.Reed recently released the seventh book in the series, The Cleanest Kill, a story about a cold case murder where the prime suspect is the incoming Chief of Police for the Evansville Police Department. Here’s the official plot summery from Amazon.Detective Jack Murphy never met a cold case he couldn’t crack. This one’s been on ice for 37 years. The prime suspect in a decades-old unsolved murder is about to be named Evansville’s next Chief of Police. The Mayor wants the top cop’s name cleared—and that’s why Murphy and his partner, Liddell Blanchard, are ordered to re-open the investigation. But when the victim’s sister and mother are targeted for violence, troubling new questions arise. Is this the work of the same killer, or is someone else playing a deadly game? The answers lie buried in the past. But no one digs through the dirt like Jack Murphy . . .The book is available now on Amazon, but you can also pick up a copy and support 911 Gives Hope when Reed hosts a book signing at Central Library in downtown Evansville on Saturday, June 29th from 9:30 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. Profits from all copies sold during the signing will be donated to the local non-profit. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Glostik Willy Is Taking Their “Hippy Metal” Nationwide On Spring 2017 Tour

first_imgThis Spring, Indiana-based funky rock three-piece Glostik Willy has embarked on a a nationwide run of shows as part of their “Toast The Coast” 2017 Spring Tour. As the tour rolls on, the band will take their “hippy metal” jams through Florida, Texas, New Mexico, California, Oregon, and Wisconsin, before ending up back in the midwest at May Daze 2017 in College Corner, OH on May 5th-6th. Says guitars Jameson Bradford of the tour, “We are finally doing it and taking our time while creating new friends along the way, making our story with those who love us in these far-off places…they’ve never had the chance to see us and now they can!”You can check out the music video for “Alibi” from Glostik Willy’s most recent album, Willy Town, below:Glostik Willy was formed in early 2008 by Jameson “Jay Moe” Bradford (guitar), his brother Ralf Mowf (drums) and childhood best friend Buddha Aguilar (bass). At the time, the boys were already five year veterans of the Midwest Music scene, having started their first band together at age 12. Since then, Glostik Willy has developed and sought to bridge the gap between rock and jam by forming their own genre of music that can only be described as “Hippy Metal.” To date, Glostik Willy has logged over 600 performances in more than 25 states and 2 countries. The band has hosted eight Midwest music and arts festivals, including their signature Willy Fest (headlined this past year by Molly Hatchet), and performed sets at over 70 festivals around the country.Accompanying Glostik Willy on the tour as special guest is jam poet FlowPoetry on his “Weaving Whispers” Spring Tour 2017. FlowPoetry, the “originator of Jam Poetry” from Madison, WI, will weave his socially conscious poems and stories throughout each show, bringing a spoken word element to each event.For a full list of upcoming dates for both acts, head here (Glostik Willy) and here (Flowpoetry).last_img read more

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Harvard goes to war

first_imgThis year will mark the 70th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, the “day of infamy” that drew the United States into World War II.And tomorrow (Nov. 11) is Veterans Day, the first at Harvard since the University reinstated a campus office for the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps. So what better time to recount Harvard’s role in World War II:On May 29, 1940, Harvard President James Bryant Conant, speaking as a private citizen, delivered a national radio broadcast urging aid to the Allies in preparation for war. “We must rearm at once,” he said, sentiments that earned him jeers from the isolationist community.That same year, Harvard faculty members formed the American Defense-Harvard Group in support of aiding the Allies. Early in 1941, Conant — an increasingly influential voice for the military draft, lend-lease programs, and other preparedness stances — led a mission to England on exchanging scientific information.By 1941, Harvard scientists were mobilizing, and had started research on explosives, radio electronics, and military medicine.The day after the Pearl Harbor attacks, Conant spoke to 1,200 students gathered in Sanders Theatre to hear the broadcast of President Franklin Roosevelt’s war message to Congress. Conant pledged to bend Harvard’s full resources to the war effort.By 1942, with Harvard dubbed “Conant’s Arsenal,” researchers were at work on radar jamming, night vision, aerial photography, sonar, explosives, napalm, a protocomputer, blood plasma derivatives, synthesized quinine, anti-malarial drugs, and new treatments for burns and shock. Other researchers worked on code-breaking and atomic bomb research. By 1945, Harvard income from government contracts was $33.5 million, the third highest among U.S. universities.Harvard redid its academic calendar to add a third (summer) semester, and for a time largely became a military training school. ROTC members drilled in Memorial Hall with WWI-era rifles. Drills in Harvard Yard scalped off the grass.By May 1942, Army and Navy ROTC members at Harvard numbered 1,600.Harvard’s curriculum was expanded to include aerial mapping, meteorology, camouflage, military geology, and accelerated programs A secret radio electronics detection course trained 2,000 Army, Navy, and Marine officers a year. An Army chaplains’ school, with non-Harvard faculty and 330 students per four-week session, met in the Germanic (now Busch-Reisinger) Museum.By June 1942, all of Harvard was on a wartime footing. Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson spoke at Commencement, along with Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox. About 200 faculty members had already joined the service.At the ceremony, Conant noted that war-related science was expanding so fast that it required space in Harvard Law School’s Austin Hall as well as the Hemenway Gymnasium. “Of what goes on behind those closed doors,” he added, “no word may now be told.”By then, Conant was chairman of the National Research Defense Committee, which would issue nearly 900 contracts during the war. Harvard’s largest projects were the $16 million Radio Research Laboratory and the $8 million Underwater Sound Laboratory.Chemistry Professor George B. Kistiakowsky tested new explosives and later led the Manhattan Project’s search for a way to trigger a nuclear bomb.Professor of organic chemistry Louis Fieser invented napalm, lightweight incendiary grenades, and the M-1 firestarter used for sabotage — and known as the “Harvard candle.”Harvard astronomer Fred Lawrence Whipple invented the strips of aluminum foil, or “chaff,” used to dupe enemy radar. Whipple was dubbed the “Air Corps chief of chaff.”The Electro-Acoustic Laboratory on Oxford Street researched ways to quiet noise in long-range bombers. One discovery to come out of that lab was fiberglass.In the Underwater Sound Laboratory in Hemenway, 450 employees (many of them women) worked on developing sonar. Some of the field testing was done at Spy Pond. The lab’s bearing-direction indicator for sonar and torpedo steering helped break the dominance of Nazi submarine wolf packs.At the Business School, the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory helped set standards for clothing, nutrition, and survival gear in extreme environments.The Harvard project that most influenced postwar science was the Mark I “automatic sequence-controlled calculator,” a protocomputer developed in the Computation Laboratory by Howard Hathaway Aiken, Ph.D. ’39, in cooperation with IBM. Unveiled in the summer of 1944, it was 51 feet long, and contained 72 tiered adding machines and 500 miles of wire. It was used to calculate ballistic tables and for Manhattan Project calculations.Harvard’s first cyclotron, a $55,000, 85-ton particle accelerator built in 1939 that was used in nuclear physics experiments, was shipped to Los Alamos, N.M., in 1943 for work on the first atomic bomb.In September 1943, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill accepted the honorary degree he had been offered in May. “The empires of the future,” he said in a speech on Anglo-American unity, “are the empires of the mind.”On June 29, 1944, with Harvard remaining a virtual military training facility, graduating seniors in the regular degree course numbered only 19, the smallest number since 1753.During World War II, almost 27,000 Harvard students, alumni, faculty members, and staff members served in the armed forces, and 697 dielast_img read more

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Dodgers slugger Cody Bellinger is encouraged to bunt, but not to sacrifice

first_imgLOS ANGELES — Cody Bellinger was not in the Dodgers’ starting lineup Wednesday, but he arrived early to the field for bunting practice. Bench coach Bob Geren was feeding baseballs into a pitching machine, connected to the dugout by a long orange cord.Bellinger didn’t seem like he needed the practice.“At first he did a couple sacrifices,” Geren said. “(Bellinger) said, ‘when you want me to do it?’ I said, for a shift.”So marked the end of Bellinger’s sacrifice bunting career. It never really began; none of his 818 major league plate appearances has ended in a sacrifice, while 49 have ended in a home run. Dodgers’ Dave Roberts says baseball’s unwritten rules ‘have changed, should change’ Dodgers’ Justin Turner looking rejuvenated on defense Whicker: Dustin May yet another example of the Dodgers’ eye for pitching Dodgers’ hot-hitting Corey Seager leaves game with back injury Earlier this month, Bellinger ignored a take sign on a 3-and-0 count and bunted into an out against the Cincinnati Reds. It was enough to etch the sight of Bellinger squaring his stance into the nightmares of an entire fan base. But Bellinger has bunted for a hit before, and Geren believes he can do it again.“He’s actually very good at it,” Geren said. “Today he did it, 15 just perfect, right in a row. He said, ‘good?’ I said, see ya.”Alex Verdugo is the Dodgers’ only position player who has successfully sacrificed a runner over this season. On-field bunting practice for non-pitchers is a rare sight, and Geren acknowledged that their odds of bunting in a game are even lower. Chase Utley, Chris Taylor and Kiké Hernandez were the other participants in Wednesday’s session.Sign up for our Inside the Dodgers newsletter. Be the best Dodger fan you can be by getting daily intel on your favorite team. Subscribe here.Taylor and Hernandez are the two Dodgers position players who might be asked to lay down a sacrifice bunt, Geren said. The 39-year-old Utley, who has seen his share of defensive shifts this season, volunteered to participate.“Even if you’re good at it, you get out and work on it, your confidence level just goes up,” Geren said.center_img Dodgers bench slumping Cody Bellinger for a day Chargois was tied for fourth on the team with 20 appearances out of the bullpen. The 27-year-old is 2-1 with a 4.76 ERA after allowing a walk and a go-ahead single in Tuesday’s win over the Colorado Rockies. His fastball was averaging 97 mph when the month began but was sitting 93-95 on Tuesday.“It was more of trying to clean some things up with the delivery,” Roberts said. “The slider’s been inconsistent. He’s definitely part of the solution but (going to Triple-A) kind of gets him out of the everyday fire … gives him a chance to catch his breath a little bit.”Paredes is back for his second stint with the Dodgers after facing only three hitters in his first. He’s allowed only two earned runs while striking out 19 batters in 15-1/3 innings at Triple-A Oklahoma City this season. INJURY UPDATESClayton Kershaw threw his second bullpen session since going on the disabled list with tendinitis in his left biceps. Kershaw threw 30 pitches to catcher Yasmani Grandal without a batter, then another 24 with Manager Dave Roberts standing to the left of the plate.That represents the most pitches Kershaw has thrown off a mound in one go since his last start on May 2. Roberts said Kershaw didn’t execute as well as he wanted but did not lack for stamina.“He’s pain-free and did his normal thing,” Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman said of Kershaw.Rich Hill also threw off the bullpen mound for a second straight day with a bandage covering his left middle finger blister.Hill threw only two pitches Sunday in Washington, D.C. before he had to leave the game. Roberts estimated the veteran left-hander will need another four weeks to return to a major league mound.BULLPEN SWAPLeft-hander Edward Paredes was recalled from Triple-A Oklahoma City, swapping bullpen spots with right-hander J.T. Chargois, who was optioned.Related Articles Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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