MMH rolls out new drug treatment initiative

first_imgPictured (Left to Right): Jeffrey Sharp, Ripley County Superior Court Judge; Jenny Wise, Assistant Director of Ripley County Court Services; Bonnie Ploeger, MMH Director of Quality and Risk Management; Tracy Craft, MMH Peer Recovery Coach; Nikki King, MMH Manager of Behavioral Health and Addiction Services; Joshua Harrison, PsyD, HSPP, MMH Clinical Director; Shannon Schmaltz, Director of Ripley County Court Services; Ryan King, Ripley County Circuit Court JudgeBatesville, In. — Margaret Mary Health (MMH) will begin providing intensive outpatient services for the Ripley County Courts Addiction & Drug Services (CADS) program on October 1, 2018.  A newly developed program by Ripley County Court Services, the CADS Program will enhance the present outpatient substance abuse program by extending the length of the program from 3 hours per week to 9 hours per week and incorporating direct oversight by a doctor, clinician and peer recovery coach. In addition to treatment, the program will receive behavioral modification support from Court Services, including random weekly drug screens, probation officer supervision, home visits, administrative sanctions and incentives, and report filings to the Court.Substance abuse is a known health issue facing local communities and the need for more aggressive intervention and support exists. According to Ripley County Superior Court Judge, Jeffrey Sharp, “The level of drug and alcohol-related criminal charges has risen to more than half of all felonies filed in Ripley County in 2017. On top of that, 65 percent of all probation violations were drug and alcohol-related. This program will provide the court an extra tool of supervision for individuals convicted of drug-related offenses and is certainly the most comprehensive treatment program I have seen implemented.”As a recently added service at MMH, the addiction services team has invested a significant amount of time in developing an intensive outpatient program that combines the best practices of leading programs across the country. According to MMH Clinical Director, Dr. Joshua Harrison, PsyD, HSPP, “This is a multi-faceted program incorporating therapy, skills training, guest speakers, peer support and family support to help these individuals regain confidence and reclaim their lives from the grip of addiction.”“The CADS program is an evidence-based approach to confronting the substance abuse crisis. This type of program is proven to be the most effective treatment regimen and, as a result, CADS is able to give addicts the tools they need to overcome their addiction and become productive members of the community again,” noted Ryan King, Ripley County Circuit Court Judge. “Data will be closely monitored to track program success and thereafter inform any changes that could be made. By combining the treatment knowledge of MMH with the supervision of Court Services and the accountability required by the Courts, we’re leading the way in developing an approach to best realize positive outcomes for participants suffering from addiction.”An important distinction between the CADS Program and other intensive outpatient programs is the addition of a Peer Recovery Coach. “Being able to connect with individuals and support them in their journey through recovery is something I’m very passionate about,” said Tracy Craft, MMH Peer Recovery Coach. “I’ve been there … I understand the highs and lows and what it takes to get clean and stay that way. I’m thankful to have the opportunity now to help others overcome their challenges and find their reason to stay sober.”The CADS Program is purpose driven and will focus on the participant’s individual accomplishments to determine program completion versus a set length. Graduates of the program will be awarded a certificate of completion from Judge King and Judge Sharp in a ceremony with friends and family.  Shannon Schmaltz, Director of Ripley County Court Services added, “This is an opportunity for many community members and their families to bring hope to hopelessness.”“We saw the need and felt the obligation to join the fight against drug abuse that is so prevalent in our community and surrounding areas,” said Tim Putnam, CEO of MMH. “We are in a unique position to be able to assist Court Services with changing outcomes. This partnership brings the right resources together to truly make an impact and save lives.”To learn more about Margaret Mary’s Addiction Services Program or the Ripley County CADS Program, call 812.933.5406.last_img read more

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No Darrell Waltrip, no problem? How Fox’s 2-man NASCAR Cup broadcast booth with Mike Joy, Jeff Gordon will work

first_imgNow Joy and the rest of the broadcast team have eight warm-ups, if you will — the Clash, the Duels, pole qualifying and five Cup practice sessions — before millions tune in to watch Fox’s presentation of stock car’s biggest race.In 2020, those tune-ups are vital as Fox enters its 20th season broadcasting NASCAR Cup Series races, and doing it without Darrell Waltrip for the first time.But with Joy and Gordon spearheading a still-complete and more nimble telecast, the network is on the right track. Darrell Waltrip’s retirement last year after nearly two decades of calling NASCAR Cup Series races from Fox’s broadcast booth left the network with three key issues. All pertained to the big question for 2020: How would Fox replace him?One: Not many former drivers who have won three or more Cup championships were sitting around waiting to analyze races on TV. Two: There were no retired drivers who impacted NASCAR as vocally as Waltrip did as a driver for three decades. Three: Nobody could provide the brand of entertainment Waltrip delivered for 19 years as a broadcaster. “When you put all that together, it’s a pretty impossible task,” Mike Joy told Sporting News during a phone conversation when asked about Fox’s discussions about how to replace the 73-year-old Waltrip, calling it a “cooperative” process.”The more everybody talked about it, the easier it was to see: ‘Let’s not try to reinvent that wheel. Let’s move this in a slightly different direction.'”MORE: Everything to know about the Daytona 500That new direction has Joy, 70, in a place he hasn’t been since he was calling Formula 1 races for Fox alongside analyst Derek Bell in 2000; a place to which the network hasn’t ventured in its 19-year history of broadcasting NASCAR Cup Series races. Joy and analyst Jeff Gordon in 2020 will form Fox’s first two-man booth for Cup Series broadcasts.”We know it will be different,” Joy allowed. “We don’t know it will be better. We want to put out the absolute best possible telecast. But there’s no replacing a Darrell Waltrip.”With all due respect to Waltrip — and he deserves a ton for such a prosperous broadcasting career — there are reasons to believe Fox’s new approach will indeed lead to an enhanced viewing experience.Joy said his goal is to “let the telecast breathe a bit more.” With only Gordon providing immediate analysis to complement Joy’s commentary, in theory, the viewer should be able to digest the information properly and completely without being overrun by more analysis.Gordon, after all, tends to present his analysis in a passive and laid-back manner. Yet there’s no doubt the 48-year-old who has called Cup Series races for Fox since 2016 can continue to provide insightful information in an enhanced role. It doesn’t hurt that Gordon, who retired from racing in 2015, is not far removed from the track.Of course, this two-man booth setup also comes with unique challenges.”In a three-man booth, there are always either one person talking or two people having a conversation,” Joy explained. “The third person is free to reload and work on the next storyline; to either continue the conversation or move it in a new direction.”In a two-man booth, you really don’t have that luxury, because you’re having a conversation, but you’re also trying to look for where you’re going next. In a two-man booth, you’re much more focused on the call of the race and not looking for other storylines.”MORE: Complete Daytona Speedweeks scheduleTo alleviate those concerns, Fox will lean on additional analysis from Jamie McMurray. The recently retired driver will observe races from the network’s Charlotte studio — Joy called it “a 10,000-foot view” of the action — and chime in with commentary. He’ll be joined in Charlotte by Larry McReynolds, the longtime Fox broadcaster who again will deliver information on race trends and team strategy, basically the crew chief of the broadcast.That team of commentators will be complemented by returning pit reporters Matt Yocum, Jamie Little, Vince Welch and Regan Smith. Michael Waltrip (Darrell’s younger brother) also will be on hand for his typical shenanigans.Fox put this setup to the test during last week’s Busch Clash at Daytona, the annual Cup Series exhibition race that takes place a week before the 500. If that broadcast is any indication, the network in 2020 is poised to strike an ideal combination of commentary, analysis and reporting with the desired breathing room in between.The value of that practice isn’t lost on Joy, who can remember a time when broadcast preparation wasn’t as simple.”Back in the CBS days, when all we broadcast was the Clash, the Duels and the 500, during practice sessions Buddy Baker and I would go out and sit in the infield inside Turn 3 in a car,” Joy recalled, referencing the era before Fox obtained NASCAR Cup Series broadcast rights beginning in 2001. “A car would come down the backstretch, and we’d go, ‘Oh, that’s so and so.’ That’s how we would learn what all the changes were, and who’s in each car. We didn’t have any reps on the air to be able to prepare.”last_img read more

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Community YMCA Announces New Board Leadership

first_imgSHREWSBURY – The Community YMCA Board of Directors has elected Patricia Whittemore as chairperson/chief volunteer officer and Aberdeen “Deen” Allen, Jr. as a new director at the organization’s 139th annual meeting.Whittemore, of Rumson, has been a member of the Y board since 2009 and most recently served as vice chairperson. She has been active with a number of community nonprofit organizations, including the St. George’s Church Outreach Committee and the American Cancer Society. She earned her B.A. at the University of Richmond and holds a master’s degree in public administration from Columbia University. She has three children ages 12, 10 and 8.Allen of Parlin, was appointed for a three-year term on the board of directors. He served in the military and earned a B.S. and a master’s degree from the University of Massachusetts at Boston. He continued his education at Brandeis University where he earned his Ph.D. in synthetic organometallic chemistry. He works for Colgate Palmolive where he continues to make contributions to transform the field of chemistry.last_img read more

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Watching Waterfowl and Searching for Seals Along Sandy Hook

first_imgHaines believes most people participate in the walk to see the seals rather than the waterfowl, but 8-year-old Manus Connagham was an exception. He came to see both. Photo by Patrick Olivero Photo by Patrick Olivero Families, friends and animal lovers of all sorts joined the American Littoral Society for its seal and waterfowl walk Saturday morning, led by Jeff Dement, the society’s fish-tagging program director. Haines said she typically plans four seal and waterfowl walks between January and March, with two on weekends and two on weekdays. She is considering adding an extra one if more seals continue to show up. Look for announcements at LittoralSociety.org.  Longtime friends Beth Spiro, Pat Steen, Mara Neske and Carol Cuddy, residents of Monmouth County, said they often participate in events held by the American Littoral Society. This was Neske’s first time attending this particular walk, which she admitted was not what she expected. Photo by Patrick Olivero At various locations along the peninsula during the two-hour event, Dement identified different waterfowl and scouted for seals. Through binoculars, telescopes and long-lens cameras, participants spotted the marine mammals bobbing and swimming in the water and, at Skeleton Hill Island, saw between 20 and 30 seals hauling-out, or resting out of the water on a large rock.  “There’s history everywhere you look around Sandy Hook,” he said. Photo by Patrick Olivero “We (the American Littoral Society) function as a bridge between science and the public,” he said. “Education is at the core of everything.” By Raven Rentas “It was so much more diverse than I thought it’d be. I thought, ‘Oh, he’s going to show us places to see seals and when I walk here, I can go see them,’ but that truly was not the real highlight,” Neske said. “It was the whole walk and how interesting Sandy Hook is. I mean, it’s amazing.” According to the society’s education director Nicole Haines, there are several reasons seals come to New Jersey during the winter months, including preferring the colder water temperatures of the north Atlantic. In March, the seals migrate farther north so they can continue to stay in the cold waters that suit their bodies. Dement said they also come to the Jersey Shore to look for prey.  Dement hopes events like the seal and waterfowl walk will help people recognize the importance of marine life. Manus aspires to become an ornithologist when he grows up. According to him, he “fell in love with animals” from the moment he was born. “He’s a bird watcher so we’re just always looking out for cool bird watching and nature trips,” Benson said. Besides discussing seals and waterfowl, Dement pointed out many different plants, sharing interesting facts, personal stories and historical events tied to them. Manus and his mother, Sarah Benson, traveled all the way from Brooklyn to attend the Saturday morning walk.  “I’m into marine life, reptiles, dragons and birds,” he said. The article originally appeared in the February 6-12, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times. Photo by Patrick Olivero HIGHLANDS – A little fog didn’t keep almost 50 people from eagerly searching for harbor seals along the Sandy Hook shoreline Feb. 1.last_img read more

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LAS FLORES STAKES QUOTES

first_imgSTEVE KNAPP, HARLINGTON’S ROSE, WINNER: “I didn’t think we should have got five to one (odds) today. They call me Rodney Dangerfield but I don’t mind.“She has developed. When she was two and three she wanted to run off. Now, she’s learned how to relax behind horses and this made her a much, much better horse. She’s rating well now and the layoff probably helped her out a little bit and she’s just sharp right now.“I really didn’t want the rail. As you could see she got pinched at the three eighths pole and Joe had to stand on her. He had enough horse that he could go in between and go around but it is what it is. When they’re sharp I never scratch.“I’ve got a great group of owners here. They’re a real nice group and they’re going to send me some horses, so that’ll help me out.“I don’t know where she’s going to run next. She’s had a lot of hard races in-a-row so I think I’m going to give her six weeks before I run her again and let her freshen up. I’d like to freshen her up for the next Santa Anita meet coming up (Santa Anita Spring, from April 25-June 28). NOTES: The winning owners are Thomas Halasz of Laguna Hills, CA; Ryan Johnson of Temecula, CA; Paul Newhart of San Clemente, CA and Martha Miller. TRAINER QUOTES JOCKEY QUOTES            JOE TALAMO, HARLINGTON’S ROSE, WINNER: “You can put her in any spot and she’s definitely a good horse. It was a real nice race. I was able to save some ground on the turn and she came out and just blasted off. I think Steve could have rode her today.“I was following Global Hottie and she came out at the half mile pole so I went inside and she ducked back in so I had to take up a little bit but fortunately I had enough horse to get her momentum going again.”center_img VICTOR ESPINOZA, GLOBAL HOTTIE, THIRD: “I sent her, but we couldn’t go with Tribal Gal, so I decided to sit back and it didn’t work out. She isn’t very aggressive when she’s in behind horses.” -30-last_img read more

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SANTA YSABEL STAKES QUOTES – SATURDAY MARCH 5, 2016

first_imgRICK PORTER, SONGBIRD, WINNER: “You never know. A lot of things can happen, especially the way they were talking about how she couldn’t lose today on TVG! You always worry about it.“It’s such a fantastic feeling when you get a horse like this. I’ve had some good ones, but I’m not sure I’ve ever had one this good. 2/2/2/2 -30- “Today was mostly about keeping her tuned. There’s two months between the Santa Anita Oaks and the Las Virgenes. Jerry and I talked and we felt that instead of working her to death, we would pick this race, even though a Grade III wasn’t the best thing but it turned out fine and she got plenty out of this race. They tried to challenge her. They went the first quarter in twenty-three and I thought, ‘this is fantastic!’ Then, when I saw forty-six . . . it doesn’t seem to bother her. Mike just has a way with her. He knows how to ride her just perfect.“I’ll be at Santa Anita for the Oaks. The good Lord willing, I’ll be there! Santa Anita is a good spot. I look forward to coming out there in April.” -more- JERRY HOLLENDORFER, SONGBIRD, WINNER: “We just keep doing our job and hope she keeps doing her job and we might end up in some good places with her. We’ve already been to good places with her but we could get to more.“Not really (when asked if there is pressure in that she’s so popular and such a prohibitive betting favorite). There’s more pressure not having one like this. I’m very grateful to have this filly. I’m very grateful for (owner) Rick Porter and all the people who work with him.“The Santa Anita Oaks (Grade I, $400,000, 1 1/16 miles on April 9) would be next and if she looks real good, we’ll try to think about Kentucky (the Oaks at Churchill Downs on May 6). I don’t like to think too far ahead but that’s our long-term goal. The intermediate (races) are what we’ve been doing.“I don’t do that (compare her to other great fillies he has trained). I don’t think it’s fair to her or any of the other great ones that I’ve had. They all had their own styles and individual personalities, so I accept her for what she is. She’s pretty special to me.”Do people who ask why she’s not going to run against males bother him? “No. That’s what they do on TV and the politicians. If you’re going to run in the big races you’ve got to expect people to look for things that might be vulnerable.“I don’t take anything for granted. I’m very grateful to win a race like this. I didn’t want to work her into the (Santa Anita) Oaks. I wanted to have a prep and we got the prep today.”center_img JOCKEY QUOTES MIKE SMITH, SONGBIRD, WINNER: “It was incredible. I got a bit star struck when I looked over at the big screen to see if I needed to do a little bit of work and I was just in awe of how easily she was doing things, again. I couldn’t seem to take my eyes off the big screen. I told myself, ‘I better get back to it and stay on.’ She was really on her game.“Jerry has done such a tremendous job. Jerry, Dan and the whole crew have done such a good job of keeping this great filly really happy. I think she’s happy and getting happier every time I get on her. I’m just blessed that I get to keep the weight on her back. I hope I continue to stay on.“I think she got a whole lot more out of today then we would have in the a.m. She got to go a half mile in forty six. She had to do some work today but she’s really, really good. You can’t just go around there and not do any work because eventually someone is going to make you run at some point, and you have to be ready.“I could have let someone go to the lead today, but I didn’t because it was there and it was that easy for her. But if someone was that content on it, they’ll have to definitely run to be able to do it. She’ll let them do it, but they’ll have to throw some numbers up there but I don’t think it’d be a problem. She reminds me a lot of Beholder in her three-year-old year, turning four. When she was three, she was very aggressive, on the lead all the time. But she started to get smarter with age and Songbird seems to be doing the same thing.” NOTES: There was a minus place pool on the race of $4,900.37 and a minus show pool of $158,462.66.The winning owner is Rick Porter of Lexington, Ky., who races as Fox Hill Farms, Inc. TRAINER QUOTESlast_img read more

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