LeBron James Mulling Magic Johnsons 1M Slam Dunk Offer

Miami Heat small forward LeBron James is considering former Los Angeles Lakers point guard Magic Johnson’s $1 million offer to finally give the fans what they want by participating in the NBA’s slam dunk contest.James said during a pregame interview on ESPN that he has not decided yet on taking Johnson’s offer.“Tell him I’ll get back to him,” he told the network’s Lisa Salters, who interviewed James.The 28-year-0ld James, on his way to a fourth NBA MVP, has been delighting fans during pregame warmups with an amazing aerial assault that eclipses anything the all-star weekend competition has seen in recent years. While those in attendance has marveled at James’ dunks, critics have blasted him for never participating in one of the league’s all-star weekend showcase events.James admitted during the interview: “I think about (participating) every year,” James said.Hall of Famers like Michael Jordan, Dominique Wilkins and future Hall of Famer Kobe Bryant have all won slam dunk titles.Johnson, an NBA analyst for ESPN, made the offer on Friday during a live broadcast of ESPN’s “Kia NBA Countdown.” He said that he would pay James or anyone who can beat him in the dunk contest $1 million of his own personal money.“Please, LeBron, get in the dunk contest. I’m going to put up a million dollars,” Johnson said. “A million dollars from Magic to LeBron. Please get in the dunk contest. I go every year. I want to see you out there. A million to the winner.”ESPN analyst Jalen Rose raised the bar by calling for more elite players to take part, as well.“LeBron James, Blake Griffin both have to be in it,” Rose said Friday on the show, and Johnson agreed.Griffin, the league’s premier slam-dunker, won the dunk contest in 2011.The NBA pays $100,000 to the winner and $50,000 to the runner-up. read more

Read More »

Your Backup Resolutions Five Strategies to Back Up Your Data Now

first_img Register Now » 7 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Every year you say you’ll be better at keeping your data backed up, but then life happens. You get busy. You get distracted. And the number of files in your digital life grows exponentially–all while you continue to relegate this critical task to the “I’ll get to it” pile.Sound familiar? Thought so. Backup is essential, yet most people neglect it, despite adding ever more files to their digital stockpiles. According to the Consumer Electronics Association, the average U.S. adult with online access has an average of 1800 digital files. And growing.We’ve found the tech that can help you get a handle on your backups–and help you stick to a plan. You’ll find many options that lead to the same result. Part of your challenge is picking the ones that are best for you.1. Devise a Backup Plan of AttackSurvey your backup needs, and think about what you have that is “live” data–your ongoing, working library of files–versus what is archival data, files that don’t require changes or additions. Live data might include your collection of digital music and your business documents, while archival data might include your digital photos from the past five years. Think about whether you want all of your data to reside in a single place, or whether you want to spread your backups across multiple devices. Also consider your habits: Do you need prompting to back up, or do you want to invoke a backup at will?Having evaluated your files and needs, you can better decide on a backup strategy–and on which combination of technologies makes sense for you. You’ll likely settle on a strategy that encompasses various devices and services, selected from among USB flash drives, external hard drives (see our latest Top 10 External Hard Drives chart or peek at the newest portable external hard drives), network-attached storage (see our most recent Top 5 Network-Attached Storage Devices chart), and online backup.Many hardware devices now include a backup utility as a matter of course; but whether you’ll find that backup utility (be it a separate application or one that’s integrated with the drive) useful will depend in part on the backup approach you’ve chosen. Do you want to back up all of your files? Or are you aiming to do larger, more-current sets while leaving the file archive to reside on a NAS or on a dedicated 1TB hard drive attached to your system?In steps two through five, we’ll identify some of the best technologies for helping you with your backups–and what situations and needs those technologies are most suited for.2. Organize Your FilesVarious software programs–including the traditional backup programs we rounded up recently, such as NovaStor NovaBackup Professional, EMC Retrospect Backup, and NTI Backup 5 Advanced–will find specific file types on your hard drive and back up those file types per your instructions. But it helps to devise an organized structure for the files on your hard drive; that way, you know exactly where to begin when you establish a backup routine in the aforementioned software, or if you ever do a quick-and-dirty manual backup (in which you simply drag and drop files from one drive to another within Windows Explorer).3. Try Set-It-and-Forget-It BackupLet’s be blunt: Sometimes, deciding on what to back up, and where, makes the process overwhelming. And though acknowledging that fact doesn’t negate the need for steps one and two described on the previous page, occasionally you want everything you own to be saved, with no brain activity required to get the process going.A handful of devices make jump-starting your system backups dead simple. Among the most notable faces in the crowd is the Clickfree Portable Backup Storage Appliance, which makes backup supereasy. Connect this $180, 320GB USB drive (also available in 120GB and 250GB capacities, with up to 500GB coming sometime in 2009) to your Windows-based PC, and it will back up your data files, including your music, movies, pictures, and e-mail. The drive’s built-in backup software kicks in as soon as you attach the drive to your PC; the software supports up to 350 file types. You can configure some basics, or just let the drive do everything–your choice. The drive can safeguard up to 20 PCs, and it does its backups incrementally (meaning that it does a full backup the first time, and then on subsequent occasions finds the new files and backs those up). Restoration is simply a matter of pressing the Restore button; the drive’s built-in software will then return data to its original location.If you have only enough data to fill a DVD or three, Clickfree sells DVD discs with the same backup software loaded. And the HP SimpleSave Photo utility uses an HP-branded version of the software for its discs.Rebit Disk Drive Backup is even simpler to use. Just plug in the drive (available in capacities up to 500GB for $220), give the built-in software permission to back up, and off it goes, continually protecting you in the background. By the end of January, the drive’s software will get an update that supports managing backups for up to six PCs to a single drive (a good setup for people backing up smaller sets of data, but not for users who have multiple PCs packed with multimedia collections). The company also now offers its easy-to-use software on CD, for use with any external hard drive; the CD costs $50 at its Web site.Memeo’s Autobackup software and NTI’s Shadow are competing stand-alone applications that you can buy for real-time file backup; they can require more intervention on your part, however, than either Clickfree (which is not real-time backup) or Rebit (which is real-time, much like the Apple Time Capsule for Mac OS computers).4. Use a Flash DriveUSB flash drives are ubiquitous, but nowadays 4GB is a baseline capacity, not the high end. And larger capacities–16GB, 32GB, and greater–are becoming more commonplace.The benefits to using a flash drive can be multifold. You can store your files–perhaps both your critical documents and your multimedia files–on a drive the size of your index finger, and you can keep your data close to you, in your pocket or on a keychain. Many drives offer software encryption and password protection; still more include a file-synchronization utility. The SanDisk Cruzer Titanium Plus goes one step further by letting you sync the drive with Web-based storage.SanDisk is going all out, however, with its newest offering (announced this week at CES), the SanDisk UltraBackup USB Flash Drive. The drive is expected in April, in capacities of 8GB to 64GB ($40 to $200). It has a retractable USB connector that slides inside, so you needn’t worry about caps (or cables, as you would with an external hard drive). The integrated software requires no installation; instead, it just asks you for the file types you want to back up, and it initiates a backup when you plug the drive in; a button on the unit lets you launch a backup, too.5. Send Data to an Online Backup ServiceOnline backup makes sense in some circumstances but not others. Certainly, Web-based services (such as the Webroot Secure Backup service) provide off-site redundant storage that can keep your data safe against natural and unexpected disasters (such as flooding, earthquakes, or fire). But online backup may not be appropriate if your data measures into the tens of gigabytes, or even terabytes (yes, snap-happy digital photographers and devoted music gurus, I’m looking at you). Content creators with high-capacity needs may prefer to keep their files on NAS drives and hard drives locally (or on drives located at secondary sites) rather than deal with the ongoing fees of Web-based backup.That said, many sites offer some free online backup, as much as 2GB (Mozy.com and Fabrik.com, for example). Two gigs can go a long way for basic Word and Excel documents, PDF files, and PowerPoint presentations (the ones light on multimedia, at least). For your files currently in play, online backup can be both convenient (get it anywhere you find a Wi-Fi connection), and economical.It’s all about strategy–and what type of data you need to protect. Feel free to comment below, or visit the PC World Forums, to tell us about your approach to backing up. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global January 16, 2009 Brought to you by PCWorldlast_img read more

Read More »

First Team Match

first_imgThe boss previewed the game yesterday declaring the Tigers as a “dangerous” side and he knows despite the six wins out of six, his Saints players will need to be on top of their game if we want to maintain our 100% start to the new Super League season.Holbrook will select his 17 from:1. Jonny Lomax, 2. Tommy Makinson, 3. Kevin Naiqama, 4. Mark Percival, 5. Regan Grace, 6. Theo Fages, 8. Alex Walmsley, 9. James Roby, 10. Luke Thompson, 11. Zeb Taia, 12. Joseph Paulo, 13. Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook, 15. Morgan Knowles, 16. Kyle Amor, 17. Dom Peyroux, 19. Matty Lees, 20. Jack Ashworth, 21. Aaron Smith, 23. Lachlan Coote. —————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————Castleford Tigers 19-Man Squad 1. Peter Mata’utia, 2. James Clare, 3. Greg Minikin, 4. Michael Shenton, 5. Greg Eden, 6. Jake Trueman, 8. Liam Watts, 9. Paul McShane,  10. Grant Millington, 11. Oliver Holmes, 13. Adam Milner, 14. Nathan Massey, 15. Jesse Sene-Lefao, 16. Junior Moors, 17. Alex Foster, 18. Matt Cook, 25. Tuoyo Egodo, 32. Jordan Rankin, 33. Chris Clarkson.,1. Jonny Lomax, 2. Tommy Makinson, 3. Kevin Naiqama, 4. Mark Percival, 5. Regan Grace, 6. Theo Fages, 8. Alex Walmsley, 9. James Roby, 10. Luke Thompson, 11. Zeb Taia, 12. Joseph Paulo, 13. Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook, 15. Morgan Knowles, 16. Kyle Amor, 17. Dom Peyroux, 19. Matty Lees, 20. Jack Ashworth, 21. Aaron Smith, 23. Lachlan Coote.last_img read more

Read More »

Graphene nanoribbons an icemelting coat for radar

first_imgWatch a video of an experiment in the Tour lab here: http://youtu.be/YmuFvJZlks0Read the abstract at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/am404203yFollow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related Materials:Tour Group: http://www.jmtour.comSmalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology: http://cnst.rice.eduImages for download: http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/12/1216_ICE-2-web.jpgGraphene nanoribbons embedded in polyurethane paint, seen in an electron microscope image, are part of a deicing solution created by Rice University and Lockheed Martin. The scale bar equals 1 micrometer. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThis http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/12/1216_ICE-1-web.jpgA microscopically thin layer of graphene nanoribbons embedded in polyurethane paint on top of a polyimide substrate forms a heating element that can keep structures free of ice. The material was developed at Rice University. The scale bar equals 100 micrometers. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/12/1216_ICE-3-web.jpgA new compound created by Rice University and Lockheed Martin provides a thin, robust ice-melting coat for marine, airborne and other uses. The active element consists of carbon nanotubes “unzipped” into ribbons. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/12/1216_ICE-4-web.jpgA waveguide in the Rice University lab of chemist James Tour frames a graphene nanoribbon film for testing. Rice developed the material as a thin, robust deicer for radar domes and other applications. It was found to melt ice from surfaces in temperatures as low as -4 degrees Fahrenheit. (Credit: Tour Group/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,708 undergraduates and 2,374 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 2 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/AboutRiceU. ShareDavid [email protected] [email protected] nanoribbons an ice-melting coat for radarRice University discovery is cheaper, lighter and more effective than current deicers HOUSTON – (Dec. 16, 2013) – Ribbons of ultrathin graphene combined with polyurethane paint meant for cars is just right for deicing sensitive military radar domes, according to scientists at Rice University.The Rice lab of chemist James Tour, in collaboration with Lockheed Martin, developed the compound to protect marine and airborne radars with a robust coating that is also transparent to radio frequencies.The research was published this week in the American Chemical Society journal Applied Materials and Interfaces.Bulky radar domes (known as “radomes”) like those seen on military ships keep ice and freezing rain from forming directly on antennas. But the domes themselves must also be kept clear of ice that could damage them or make them unstable. This task is usually accomplished with a metal framework that supports and heats ceramic alumina (aluminum oxide), Tour said. But these materials are heavy, and metallic elements must be installed far from the source of radio signals to keep from interfering.“It’s very hard to deice these alumina domes,” Tour said. “It takes a lot of power to heat them when they’re coated with ice because they’re very poor conductors.”Enter graphene, the single-atom-thick sheet of carbon that both conducts electricity and, because it’s so thin, allows radio frequencies to pass unhindered. Spray-on deicing material that incorporates graphene nanoribbons would be lighter, cheaper and more effective than current methods, Tour said.“This started when (Lockheed Martin engineer) Vladimir Volman saw a presentation by Yu Zhu, a postdoc in my lab at the time,” he said. “Volman had calculated that one could pass a current through a graphene film less than 100 nanometers thick and get resistive heating that would be great for deicing. Zhu was presenting his technique for spraying nanoribbons films and Volman recognized the potential.”Pristine graphene transmits electricity ballistically and would not produce enough heat to melt ice or keep it from forming, but graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) unzipped from multiwalled carbon nanotubes in a chemical process invented by the Tour group in 2009 do the job nicely, he said. When evenly dispersed on a solid object, the ribbons overlap and electrons pass from one to the next with just enough resistance to produce heat as a byproduct. The effect can be tuned based on the thickness of the coating, Tour said.In initial experiments, the team led by Volman and Zhu spray-coated a surface with soluble GNRs. “They said it works great, but it comes off on our fingers when we touch it,” Tour said.He found the solution in a Houston auto parts store. “I bought some polyurethane car paint, which is extremely robust. On a car, it lasts for years. So when we combined the paint and GNRs and coated our samples, it had all the properties we needed.”Lab samples up to two square feet were assembled using a flexible polymer substrate, polyimide, which was spray-coated with polyurethane paint and allowed to dry. The coated substrate was then put on a hotplate to soften the paint, and a thin GNR coat was airbrushed on. When dried, the embedded ribbons became impossible to remove. Tour said the researchers have also tried putting GNRs under the polyurethane paint with good results.The 100-nanometer layer of GNRs — thousands of times thinner than a human hair — was hooked to platinum electrodes. Using voltage common to shipboard systems, the compound was sufficient to deice lab samples cooled to -4 degrees Fahrenheit within minutes. Further experiments found them to be nearly invisible to radio frequencies.Tour said the availability of nanoribbons is no longer an issue now that they’re being produced in industrial quantities.“Now we’re going to the next level,” he said, noting that GNR films made into transparent films might be useful for deicing car windshields, a project the lab intends to pursue.Volman suggested the material would make a compelling competitor to recently touted nanotube-based aerogels for deicing airplanes in the winter. “We have the technology; we have the material,” he said. “It’s very durable and can be sprayed on to heat any kind of surface.”Co-authors of the paper include Rice graduate students Abdul-Rahman Raji and Changsheng Xiang; Wei Lu and Carter Kittrell, research scientists at Rice’s Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology; and Bostjan Genorio, a former postdoctoral researcher at Rice, now a visiting scientist at Argonne National Laboratory. Tour is the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry as well as a professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and of computer science.The Lockheed Martin Corp. through the LANCER IV program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the Office of Naval Research supported the research.-30-last_img read more

Read More »