Road closures for Great Limerick Run

first_imgLinkedin THE Great Limerick Run will take place in the city this Sunday, May 1, and many road closures will be in place.The following will be fully or partially closed at various stages in the day;Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Pery square: Full closure from 7am to 2pm – No parkingHartstonge Street: Full closure from 7am to 2pm – No parkingBarrington Street: Full closure from 7am to 2pm- No parkingCatherine Place: Full closure from 7am to 2pm – No parkingCanal Bank: Partial closure from Hymies Boreen to Park Road from 7am 12 noonMill Lane: Full closure from 10am to 2.30pm – No parkingRussell’s Quay, Bishop’s Quay, Howley’s Quay and Harvey’s Quay: Full closure from 10am to 2.30pm – No parking, No left turn crossing Shannon Bridge to city centre along the quaysHonans Quay to intersection with Liddy St: Full closure from 10am to 2.30pm – No parkingSarsfield Street: from Henry Street to Bridge, Full closure from 10am to 4pm – No parkingSarsfield Bridge: Full closure from 10am to 4pm – No parkingClancy Strand: Full closure from 10am to 2.30pm – No parkingLower Shelbourne Road from Ennis Road to NCRd. at Ard Scoil Ris: Partial closure from 10am to 3.30pm, right lane heading away from Ennis RoadNorth Circular Road from Lower Shelbourne Road to Roses Ave: Full closure from 10am to 3.30pm, parking permittedNorth Circular Road Road between Roses Ave and Westfield Park: Full closure from 10am to 3.30pm – Parking permittedNorth Circular Road from Westfield Park to Lower Shelbourne Road: Full closure from 10am to 3.30pm – Parking permittedNorth Circular Road, from Lower Shelbourne Road to O’Callaghan Strand: Full closure from 10am to 3.30pm – Parking permittedO’Callaghan Strand: Full closure from 10am to 3.30pm, parking permittedSarsfield Street, from Liddy Street to O’Connell Street: Partial closure of right lane from 10am to 4pmO’Connell Street from William Street to Cecil Street intersection: Full closure from 9am to 5pm, no parkingRoche’s Street, from Catherine Street to O’Connell Street: Full closure from 9am to 5pm – No parkingShannon Street, from Henry Street to O’Connell Street: Full closure from 9am to 5pm, no parkingShannon Street, from Henry Street to O’Connell Street: Full closure from 9am to 5pm – No parkingIn addition to the above restrictions the following additional roads will have no parking restrictions in place:Upper Mallow Street: Both sides of street from 7am to 2pmBoherbuoy Across from FAS / City Park area: 7am to 11.30amO’Connell Avenue: Punch’s Cross to Quin Street inbound lane to city: 7am to 2pmQuin Street: Both sides of street from 7am to 2pmParnell Street: parking lane across from railway side, from 7am to 1pmLiddy Street: former Dunnes side, from 10am to 2.30pmHigh Road: left side heading towards Thomond Park, away from city, from 10am to 2.30pmSexton St North: left side heading towards Thomond Park, away from city, from 10am to 2.30pmOld Cratloe Road: across from Thomond Park from 10am to 2.30pmEnnis Road: Ivans to Shelbourne Cross – Inbound lane from 10am to 3pmLower Cecil Street: Across from GPO side from 7am to 5pm Facebook Twitter Advertisement Printcenter_img NewsLocal NewsRoad closures for Great Limerick RunBy admin – April 27, 2011 995 Email WhatsApp Previous articleLimerick highest for burst pipe claimsNext articleAndy Lee to face “The Technician” adminlast_img read more

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Pandemic Reveals Weak Spots in Housing Finance

first_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago About Author: Krista F. Brock Pandemic Reveals Weak Spots in Housing Finance  Print This Post Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Coronavirus 2020-05-22 Seth Welborn Sign up for DS News Daily Previous: The Way We Were: COVID-19’s Impact on Appraisals Next: Coronavirus Changes Disaster Response Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Pandemic Reveals Weak Spots in Housing Finance Related Articles Over the past couple of months, as the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted normal life for Americans across the country, we began to see the first ripples of disturbance to the housing and mortgage markets. Today, we are beginning to see those ripples develop into greater waves with the potential to leave widespread and long-lasting impacts. However, certain areas of the market appear less vulnerable than others.Home listings have been slashed to nearly half of what they were before the pandemic, homebuilders are quickly shifting course, and mortgage credit appears to be drying up.“When the COVID-19 crisis struck in full force in March, the housing and mortgage markets were in as good a place as they had been since the early 2000s,” wrote four housing market experts at the Urban Institute in a research paper titled, “The Mortgage Market Has Caught the Virus.”However, “These strong conditions have been upended with the COVID-19 crisis,” they said.In the housing finance market, uncertainty means risk, and risk is either taken on at a higher price or avoided altogether. Currently, investors “in every corner of the mortgage market are pulling back aggressively on their exposure to credit risk,” the paper stated.Over the past decade, the mortgage market has seen growth in non-agency loans and the debut of the GSEs’ credit risk transfer (CRT) market. Both of these sectors are on shaky ground right now.“All told, we are on course to undermine much of the mortgage ecosystem that has developed over the last decade,” said the researchers.However, there are areas of the market that remain on more stable ground amid today’s market stress, and those, the researchers point out, are the areas of the market backed by the government.Thus the researchers advocate the government play a more active role in the housing finance market on a permanent basis.“While a global pandemic is hopefully anomalous, that the mortgage market has run ashore twice in just over a decade should give us pause,” they wrote, adding that perhaps leaving major portions of the housing market unsupported by the government may be “unhelpful and perhaps simply illusory.”Instead of waiting for a crisis to hit and then scrambling to find a way for the government to provide necessary support, we should simply “acknowledge that government support will be needed in a time of crisis, and plan and pay for it.”The researchers also laid out a few short-term solutions to today’s market woes.One is for the Federal Reserve to provide support to servicers in the form of a lending facility. While millions of homeowners are relieved to have their loans in forbearance during this time, servicers are left on the hook with significant costs that the government has only partially mitigated for them.Nonbank mortgage servicers are at risk, and with a significant footprint in today’s market, instability and failure in this sector could have major implications for the market, especially for low-income and minority borrowers, the researchers stated.In the CRT market, the FHFA should first assure investors that loans in COVID-19-related forbearance will not be qualified as delinquent. They should also purchase some “modest amount of CRT securities” to help stabilize the market, according to the research paper.The non-agency market should be approached delicately, but the researchers did offer two suggestions: expand the Federal Reserve’s Term Asset-Backed Lending Facility to help boost non-agency securitization and reinstate the Treasury’s Public-Private Investment Program to provide equity matching investments for non-agency mortgage-backed securities.center_img Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Krista Franks Brock is a professional writer and editor who has covered the mortgage banking and default servicing sectors since 2011. Previously, she served as managing editor of DS News and Southern Distinction, a regional lifestyle publication. Her work has appeared in a variety of print and online publications, including Consumers Digest, Dallas Style and Design, DS News and DSNews.com, MReport and theMReport.com. She holds degrees in journalism and art from the University of Georgia. Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Share 1Save in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Tagged with: Coronavirus The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago May 22, 2020 1,527 Views Subscribelast_img read more

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June 2019: Credit Union Cybersecurity Tip of the Month

first_img continue reading » The user provisioning process is an integral part of your credit union’s security. It can often be considered an IT problem, but it is an area that affects the security and operation of the entire credit union.  User provisioning encompasses not only account creation at hire but also includes the entire lifecycle management of user accounts.  A strong user provisioning program addresses account creation at hire, modifications during role changes, account removal, and periodic auditing of accounts.Account provisioning should be based on the principle of least privilege; granting only those privileges and access that an employee needs to accomplish their work and no more.  At a minimum, a good account provisioning program should include the following elements.Well defined user request forms that make it easy for managers to request required access that clearly translates to the roles that IT will assign the users to in the credit union’s systems. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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In-person summer camps starts Monday at Roberson

first_imgHowever, the camp won’t happen without changes. All staff members and campers will be required to wear masks, the number of campers will be capped at 10, and social distancing will be enforced. Additionally, every camper will get their own supplies to be used during the week to limit common touch points. Cole says while virtual experiences are nice, at the Roberson, in-person is hard to beat. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — As many summer camps are going virtual this summer, the Roberson Museum and Science Center is welcoming campers through their doors this summer. “We kept seeing all of the other organizations in the area shutting down their summer camps, so we really wanted to make sure that we ran them,” Cole said. “We want them to get out of the house, we want interaction outside of my own home.” “With the camps, in person, we’re allowed to use the exhibitions in the building, we’re allowed to use the mansion, the different space we have here, whereas virtually it’s nice to look at them but you’re not going to get the same reaction, the same interaction as you would if the kids were here in the exhibitions themselves,” she said. The Roberson will host camps starting on July 13 and will run until early September. Public programs coordinator Kelly Cole said giving kids in the area an opportunity to learn this summer was vital in the Roberson’s decision.last_img read more

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The number of cruise passengers continues to grow

first_imgCover photo: Pixabay, Source: CBS In the period from January to October 2019, 72 foreign cruise ships entered Croatian seaports, with 672 cruises (+4,3). Out of a total of 672 cruises, most trips were realized in the Dubrovnik-Neretva County (60,1%) and the Split-Dalmatia County (25,9%), which is a total of 86,0%. The largest number of voyages was made by ships flying the flags of Malta (189 voyages) and the Bahamas (121 voyages), while the largest number of passengers arrived by ships flying the flags of Panama (267 thousand passengers) and Malta (253 thousand passengers). The port of Dubrovnik (495 visits) had the most visits of foreign cruise ships, followed by the ports of Split (253 visits) and Zadar (108 visits).center_img The most visited seaports were Dubrovnik, Split and Zadar The remaining 14,0% of trips were made in the following counties: Zadar (6,1%), Istria (3,4%), Primorje-Gorski Kotar (3,1%) and Šibenik-Knin (1,4%). There were 1 passengers (+ 056%) on these ships, who stayed in Croatia for 8,2 days (+ 1%), according to data from the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS).last_img read more

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Royal Opera House retail sold in latest Irish swoop

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