PREMIUMMinisters’ blunders may erode public trust in Jokowi

first_imgGoogle As President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s administration handles crisis after crisis in the first five months of his second term in office, some of his aides have been criticized for public statements that have caused anxiety and distrust in the government.Health Minister Terawan Agus Putranto has been criticized for his lack of transparency and sluggish efforts to test for and trace the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) while other countries have scrambled to improve public health measures to contain the global outbreak.While declaring the country virus-free and asking people to keep praying, the minister did not carefully trace potential cases despite reports that certain foreign travelers who had transited in the country had later tested positive for the virus.The first two confirmed COVID-19 patients, who are a mother and daughter, were discovered after bot… LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Facebook Log in with your social account Jokowi-second-term Terawan-Agus-Putranto health-ministry COVID-19 harun-masiku PDI-P Yasona-Laoly Muhadjir-Effendy marriage Fachrul-Razi niqab Linkedin Topics : Forgot Password ?last_img read more

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Klitschko vows to win in Fury re-match

first_imgHe’s the current WBA and WBO title holder, but was stripped of the IBF belt after choosing another meeting with Klitschko over the mandatory challenger. Wladimir Klitschko’s vowing to “remedy his mistake” in a re-match with Britain’s world heavyweight champion Tyson Fury.The two fighters will meet in Manchester on October the 29th – eleven months after Fury defeated the Ukranian.The British boxer cancelled their initial date in July.last_img

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Marina Expansion Delayed But Predict Spring Opening

first_imgOCEANPORT – The long awaited rebirth of the former Fort Monmouth Marina on Riverside Avenue has hit a snag over red tape, official ownership, and an expansion that includes a restaurant and a bar, as well disgruntled neighbors.Still, officials and the operators expect at least a portion of the marina to be operating by spring.Operators, who say they are happy to secure all the proper permits and meet with neighbors to address their concerns, predict the boat launch and 71 slips on Oceanport Creek will open May 1, with slip space applications for boaters expected to be available later this month. Boat rentals including kayaks, paddleboats and other small crafts will be run by Red Bank Marina. The operators have hired a general manager and trained Italian chef for family-friendly fare including burgers, soups, salads, dinner items, a bar menu and a lighter menu in summer. The restaurant will be open year-round.The renamed Marina at Oceanport was leased by Asbury Park Development Partners (APDP) through the Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority (FMERA) last year, beginning its resurrection following years of dormancy exacerbated by extensive Superstorm Sandy damage.The new operators opened outdoor portions and boating to the public last summer. Partners in APDP, Fuller “Trip” Brooks and Mario Criscione, went on to enter into exclusive purchase agreement negotiations with FMERA, and are expected to take over full ownership soon under the name Marina at Oceanport Partners LLC.That company includes Criscione, Brooks, and “agents” of APDP, Criscione’s daughters, Deanna Queenan and Jessica Sarnak.One of the issues in the complex scenario is the issuance of three violations and who’s actually responsible for each.Two of three violations cited by New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Bureau of Coastal Land Use Compliance and Enforcement under the Coastal Area Facility Review Act (CAFRA) occurred while the Army still owned the fort; the third involves work on the building by the new operators.The property is technically owned by the Army so the new operators are conferring with their attorneys to determine whether the Army is responsible for the pre-existing violations and what their next course of action should be.“We did get approval on each of our building changes and expansions from FMERA and got all proper permits from Oceanport,” Sarnak said. “We are only missing CAFRA. We didn’t know we needed it. FMERA includes DEP officials and we relied on their expertise. We were given approval to continue to work on the footprint and anything already in existence. If we are able to receive a temporary Certificate of Occupancy, we will be able to open the main indoor bar and a portion of the outdoor seating with a separate bar. FMERA has been wonderful to us.”Irate Riverside Avenue neighbor Michael Sikand, an unsuccessful bidder on the marina, however, has different ideas. He publicly vowed to stop the restaurant from opening at the February 26 FMERA meeting. Speaking for himself and the neighbor directly adjacent to the marina property, he called the expansion “illegal” adding, “People will be drinking 30 feet from residents’ homes near their yards and kids.” Sikand called for an independent investigation to determine what actually happened, ending with, “We will make sure the marina does not open this spring.” He accused officials of ignoring his previous correspondence on the alleged violations.“We acted immediately, visited the site, took measurements and photographs and notified (Oceanport Borough Administrator) John O. Bennett,” explained FMERA Executive Director Bruce Steadman. “The marina operator is preparing CAFRA applications. We are supporting that process and responded in an appropriate manner.” Work has stopped on the portion of the building cited in the state’s Notice of Violation.At issue is the expansion of a previously existing marina building by approximately 1,750 feet and the change in use into a restaurant and bar, as well as the expansion of the building over the top of the bulkhead.“The Army has a different permitting process and should be able to help us with permitting,” Queenan said. “We are still in the early stages to determine the best course of action.” She said the two pre-existing violations performed by the Army include a bulkhead on the west side of the property and reconfiguration of some docks that the DEP found the Army performed without a permit.“Existing docks have been reconfigured, expanded or extended beyond the limits of the license area by the Army,” she added. “We haven’t reconfigured the docks because we thought it was done properly. The building was there. Our objective is not to create noise and traffic. The property is zoned commercial. No one has reached out to us to ask about our plans. We would be more than happy to sit and discuss it with the neighbors.”“The state owns the property up to the mean water line,” said FMERA Director of Facilities Planning Rick Harrison. “We are trying to bring the property to full compliance. It must be resolved. We are working with the DEP and expect the marina will be open for the boating season and the restaurant open in spring.” By John Burton and Laura D.C. Kolnoski. John Burton can be reached at [email protected]last_img read more

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Fair Haven Approves Dunkin’ Application; Resident Files Lawsuit

first_imgA lawsuit filed in county court in late July by nearby resident Andrew Reger challenges the ruling made by the defendant Fair Haven Zoning Board. Also named in the lawsuit is Fair Haven Retail, LLC, owner of the River Road Shopping Center. Cole also said she fears patrons will park on the opposite side of the road and run across to get to the shopping center, which can put them in danger of being struck by a vehicle. “It might be time for Fair Haven to figure out what it wants to be because we thought we were going to be a small town,” a biker-and walker-friendly area, she said. “But it seems at least some people, in particular the mayor, have a different plan in mind.” “Everybody who wanted to be heard was heard,” the mayor said. “The process worked and it worked well.” The planning board’s decision follows determinations by the zoning board and the zoning officer that the Dunkin’ establishment is a category-two restaurant, making it a permitted use in the borough’s B-1 zone. Objectors have argued it should be considered a category-three restaurant, or a drive-thru, which would deem it a non-permitted use in the zone. Much of the conversation that night centered on revised site plans for the shopping center to address traffic and safety concerns raised by board members and residents. One idea, presented by borough traffic engineer Betsy Dolan, was to turn the eastern driveway into a right-turn-only lane but it was ultimately rejected. By Allison Perrine The approval was delivered in a 7-2 vote at the Tuesday, Aug. 20 meeting. “No” votes were cast by planning board chair Todd Lehder and councilwoman Betsy Koch, planning board liaison. Others, like resident Tracy Cole, were unhappy with the outcome, citing traffic impact concerns. At one time the borough had an ordinance banning fast-food establishments in Fair Haven, but it went missing during a recodification process in 2002. The borough is now working on a new ordinance to specifically ban drive-thru restaurants. FAIR HAVEN – Months of debate came to a head as the borough planning board approved a Dunkin’ coffee chain in the River Road Shopping Center. “I think congestion on River Road may force commuters to seek alternate routes through the residential neighborhoods at the same time of day our kids are going to school on bikes and walking,” Cole said. When asked about his feelings on the planning board’s decision, Mayor Benjamin J. Lucarelli said he was pleased that the matter came to a conclusion and that the planning board did an excellent job of exercising a democratic process. last_img read more

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Religious People Have Better Fitness

first_imgEvolutionists have vague definitions of “fitness,” but if physical and mental health are measures, then church-goers score high.African-Americans who attend church less likely to suffer mental-health issues than those who don’t (Medical Xpress). This study from Case Western Reserve University finds that “African-Americans who regularly attend church are far less likely to suffer from mental-health issues, including depression and suicide” than those who don’t.“In a nutshell, being in touch with family and church members is good for mental health,” said Ann W. Nguyen, an assistant professor at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve.“People who are more emotionally close to church members have lower rates of suicide. Religion is support for [many] African-Americans.”Credit: DFCResearchers find religious involvement deters recreational and medical marijuana use (Medical Xpress). In this first-ever study of drug use and religion, Florida State University sociologists found less experimenting with marijuana among those active in their religion.Levels of religious attendance ranged from never attending services to attending more than once a week. Researchers found with every level of increased attendance the odds of being a recreational marijuana user reduced by 13 percent. The study found the likelihood of recreational marijuana use decreased by 20 percent as religious salience levels increased.Because of possible sampling bias due to reluctance of some individuals to self-report their habits, the numbers could be off somewhat. Nevertheless, the finding “confirms previous studies of recreational marijuana use,” the lead author said. This was the first to show that religiosity also made adults uneasy about attempting medical marijuana.Study finds religious involvement does little to prevent opioid abuse (Medical Xpress). While the headline appears to deny religion’s benefit for opioid abuse, further reading shows that churches have not caught up to the problem of the opioid epidemic. In other cases of drug abuse, though, church attendance helps mothers stay away from illegal drugs.“Religious involvement matters for illegal drug use because religious communities directly condemn this behavior,” Burdette said. “However, religious communities are just beginning to discuss the dangers of prescription drug abuse.”Specifically, researchers found the probability of engaging in any illicit drug use was significantly lower among women who attended church at least once a week compared to those who reported attending services a couple of times a year or less. This was also true for marijuana use.This is another study from Florida State by Amy Burdette, but was published in a different journal. The one on marijuana use was published in the Journal of Drug Issues. The one on opioids was published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion.A journal for the scientific study of religion? We need sermons on the theological implications of science! What gives scientists the right to analyze religion, when scientific practice today is highly worldview laden? Scientists could benefit from some time in church, learning to have integrity and honesty, without which science is dead.A note to evolutionists and atheists: these studies, to the extent they are valid, show that religious people are more “fit” than you. If you believe that religiosity is a product of natural selection, then why are you fighting the forces that made humans this way? You’re fighting your selfish genes. To increase your fitness, go to church and get religion! Follow our Site Map for tips.Credit: Brett Miller(Visited 313 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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First microscopy centre for South Africa

first_imgThe high resolution transmission electronmicroscope, valued at R30m, thatcan measure materials down tothe atomic level.(Image: NMMU) Jan Neethling, head of the centre andone of the country’s foremost electronmicroscopists.(Image: NMMU) The new facility is the most sophisticatedbuilding of its kind on the continent(Image: NMMU)MEDIA CONTACTS • Debbie Derry Senior Manager: CommunicationMarketing and Corporate Relations+27 41 504 3057Wilma den HartighSouth Africa’s new R120-million (US$15 million) electron microscopy centre, the first of its kind on the continent, will enable the country and Africa to compete with the world’s best in nanoscience and nanotechnology research.The Centre for High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) is based at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape.Nanoscience is the study of atoms, molecules and objects at microscopic scale. Nanotechnology, often referred to as “the science of small things” has numerous applications in the development and manufacture of new products.“Without a doubt, this new centre for nanoscience and nanotechnology is going to mean big business for South Africa,” says Prof Jan Neethling, head of the centre and one of the country’s foremost electron microscopists.The hi-tech HRTEM centre was established in collaboration with the National Research Foundation, the Department of Science and Technology, Sasol and the Department of Higher Education and Training.“To be internationally competitive in materials research and nanoscience, South Africa needed a modern, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy facility,” he says.Bringing world-class technology to SANeethling says that until now South African scientists had to travel overseas to conduct research of this nature.“For many years, South Africa couldn’t afford or didn’t realise the importance of putting money into a centre like this,” he adds.Now that the new centre is up and running, scientists can conduct world-class research without leaving the country.Importance of electron microscopy researchElectron microscopy uses electron microscopes to view objects. This type of microscope is capable of much higher magnifications and has a greater resolving power than a light microscope, enabling the viewing of far smaller objects in finer detail.Developments in electron microscopy over the past 80 years have yielded many important technological advances worldwide.It has contributed to the development of modern engineering materials and the micro-electronics revolution, which has given the world access to television, mobile phones, optical fibre communication and computers.In the medical field it has enabled biologists to study the structure of cells, bacteria and viruses.Powerful microscopes on siteThe centre is equipped with technology valued at R90-million ($11 million). The suite of instruments includes the Japanese-made high-resolution transmission electron microscope, which can analyse materials at atomic level. It’s one of the world’s highest resolution commercial analytical transmission electron microscopes.There are also three additional hi-tech electron microscopes, each with different capabilities.Having such advanced technology in South Africa is of major benefit to the country.Neethling says it will help South Africa to become a manufacturing-driven nation and improve its international competitiveness.“With our research and instruments we will be able to assist with the development of new products,” he explains.Many industries to benefitSectors that can benefit from research conducted at the centre include the aerospace and automotive industries, Sasol’s coal-to-liquids technology, the cutting and drilling tool industry, nuclear energy, minerals beneficiation and sensor technologies such as infra-red.The new technology will also make it possible to perform important research into national priorities, which include clean water, energy, mineral beneficiation and manufacturing.Sasol will use the high-resolution microscope, in which it has invested R6-million ($764 000), to improve and analyse the catalysts required to make liquid fuels and chemicals from coal.Element Six, which manufactures synthetic diamonds, will use the facility to improve the strength of oil drill bits composed of synthetic diamond particles held together by a strong glue-like compound.Neethling says the development of these diamond tools relies heavily on nanoscale research using high-resolution electron microscopy.Building designThe new facility is the most sophisticated building of its kind on the continent and had to be constructed in keeping with stringent requirements.The HRTEM centre consists of two buildings: one houses the microscopes and the other accommodates staff and students.The building and research centre had to be designed around the high resolution transmission electron microscope. The structure was built in such a way to protect the microscope from mechanical and acoustic vibrations and magnetic fields, as the slightest deviation could result in failure to see atoms.The labs housing each microscope also have to be absolutely quiet to limit mechanical vibrations. To achieve this, a “room within a room” design was used.Each lab is built on top of a large isolated concrete block, weighing 100 tons, positioned on a specially prepared graded substrate. Each concrete block and adjoining laboratory is separated from external walls by a 100mm air cavity on all four sides.last_img read more

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Trudeau names judge Arthur LeBlancto be Nova Scotia lieutenant governor

first_imgOTTAWA – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has named a Nova Scotia judge as the province’s new lieutenant-governor.Arthur LeBlanc, who has been a judge of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia since 1998, replaces John James Grant in the vice-regal job.Lieutenant-governors represent the Queen in their respective provinces, handling her roles and functions, including granting royal assent to laws.Leblanc was born in West Arichat, N.S. in 1943, graduated from St. Francis Xavier University in 1964 with a commerce degree and earned a law degree from Dalhousie University in 1968.He practised law in the province for 30 years before being named to the bench.He is married to Rosemarie Patricia (Patsy) LeBlanc and they have three sons and six grandchildren.The prime minister said LeBlanc is well respected for his legal work, as well as his contributions to and volunteer organizations.“He is an excellent choice as Nova Scotia’s next lieutenant-governor and I have no doubt that he will make many important contributions to the future of his province,” Trudeau said in a statement.“last_img read more

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Jerry Garcia Foundation Shares the Fine Art of Grateful Dead Founder

first_imgThe Jerry Garcia Foundation is presenting a new limited edition archival print of Garcia’s Wisteria oil painting for Spring 2016.Jerry Garcia’s Wisteria The Wisteria piece can be previewed this week with 30 other pieces in The Art of Jerry Garcia exhibition at the Psylodelic Gallery located in Pomeroy, Ohio. The exhibit runs from April 6th through early August. All proceeds from eleven donation pieces to benefit the Psylodelic Gallery.“We are so honored to be able to show my old friend Jerry’s work in the Gallery. If Jerry and I were to be able to look into the future back in the 60’s when we met, we sure would’ve gotten a kick out this. I made sure that I worked on hanging this show in particular. His work is exemplary,” said Jorma Kaukonen, member of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and a Grammy nominee, and founding member of two legendary bands, Jefferson Airplane and the still-touring Hot Tuna.The Asbury Park Music Foundation will also feature Garcia’s Wisteria at the Asbury Park Music in Film Festival. The piece can be seen when it appears in the Art629 Gallery during a “Growing Up Dead” panel discussion preview of the soon-to-be-released Martin Scorsese Grateful Dead Film. Jerry Garcia Foundation Advisory Board member and Ambassador, Seth Rogen is joining Justin Kreutzmann and APMFF Advisory Board Member, Jim Dowd to speak on the panel in the Art629 Gallery at 12:00 pm on April 9th. Jerry Garcia and the Grateful Dead will be celebrated in song and art at the Film Festival throughout that day and evening.“The Grateful Dead concert in Englishtown in the late 70s was the largest show in New Jersey history. The energy that follows the Dead is so well aligned with the mission of the Festival and the Foundation. We are honored to include Jerry’s artwork at APMFF 2016. Special thanks to the Jerry Garcia Foundation for their continued support,” said Matt Hockenjos, Executive Director of the Asbury Park Music Foundation.The art will be available at auction with proceeds benefitting the Asbury Park Music Foundation.Garcia’s fine art has toured in various exhibitions since 1990. In 2014, the virtuoso’s work was exhibited at the Centre National d’art Contemporain Le Magasin, an art museum located in Grenoble, France. Several of the exhibition pieces were donated to the museum.“Wisteria brings the viewer impressions of spring. Cascading purple flowers and verdant hills and trees move in graceful lines touching the blue sky,” said Manasha Garcia, co-founder of the Jerry Garcia Foundation. “We’re very pleased to present Wisteria to the community and honored to have it exhibited at the Psylodelic Gallery and at the Asbury Park Music in Film Festival.”For more information, please visit The Jerry Garcia Foundation website.last_img read more

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