Man facing charges after baseball bat assault at Stripes

first_img Twitter WhatsApp By admin – February 1, 2018 Local NewsCrime Pinterest Pinterest Facebook Brandon Ramirez Police charged a suspect who reportedly struck two victims multiple times with a baseball bat outside of a convenience store Wednesday night.Officers responded to the incident around 10:09 p.m. Wednesday at Stripes, 1300 E. Eighth St., according to an Odessa Police Department news release.Upon arrival, police made contact with the suspect, 23-year-old Brandon Ramirez, who was found to be in possession of a gold Omaha baseball bat.The release detailed that Ramirez and the two victims, a 24-year-old man and a 23-year-old woman, reportedly got into an argument, and Ramirez struck the victims multiple times with the bat. The man was hit on his left forearm and the woman was hit on her right knee. OPD Spokesman Steve LeSueur said the woman was taken to Medical Center Hospital.Ramirez was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, a second-degree felony.Jail records show Ramirez was taken to the Ector County Detention Center Thursday and was released the same day on a $50,000 bond. Facebook Twitter Previous articleDeputies charge suspect in high-speed chaseNext articleOPD: Suspect evading officers found with methamphetamine admin WhatsApp Man facing charges after baseball bat assault at Stripeslast_img read more

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Autonomous scooter software passes a critical driving test

first_imgRelated Posts How IoT Will Play an Important Role in Traffic … Amanda Razani How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi… Surveillance at the Heart of Smart Citiescenter_img Tags:#Autonomous#Internet of Things#IoT#MIT#scooter#Self-Driving IT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A… A recent trial for a mobility scooter that is self-driving completes a lengthy process of testing the software designed by researchers from the National University of Singapore, the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology and MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.The same sensor configuration and software has been used in trials of golf carts and self-driving vehicles too. Theoretically, an individual struggling with mobility could use this autonomous scooter to move through hallways and lobbies, or a self-driving golf cart to get across a parking lot and into an autonomous car.The new test runs of these vehicular machines prove that the research group’s control algorithms can work both indoors and outside, which is great news.See Also: Otto and Budweiser buys the world the first autonomous trucking roundScott Pendleton, a graduate student in mechanical engineering at the National University of Singapore, and a research fellow at SMART, states “We were testing them in tighter spaces. One of the spaces that we tested in was the Infinite Corridor of MIT, which is a very difficult localization problem, being a long corridor without very many distinctive features. You can lose your place along the corridor. But our algorithms proved to work very well in this new environment.”The system the research team created involves several layers of software. There are low-level control algorithms that allow a vehicle to react promptly to changes in its environment, such as a person stepping in front of its path.Then, there are map-building algorithms that it uses to create a map and route-planning algorithms that are used by the vehicle to figure out its location on the map. Scheduling algorithms help allocate fleet resources and, lastly, an online booking feature allows users to schedule rides.Daniela Rus, the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and one of the project’s leaders, explains that having scooters, cars and golf carts that all utilize the same control algorithms for all types of vehicles offers several advantages. The first one being that it is more practical to perform reliable studies of the system’s performance overall.This scooter requires software uniformity“If you have a uniform system where all the algorithms are the same, the complexity is much lower than if you have a heterogeneous system where each vehicle does something different. That’s useful for verifying that this multilayer complexity is correct,” Rus states.Software uniformity, allows information to be transferred from one vehicle to another easily. As work continues on this project, the research team is providing their vehicles with machine-learning systems, so that interactions with their surroundings will better the performance of their navigation and control algorithms.“Once you have a better driver, you can easily transplant that to another vehicle. That’s the same across different platforms,” explains Marcelo Ang, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at NUS who co-leads the project with Rus.Software uniformity also gives more flexibility in its allocation of system resources too, in regards to the scheduling algorithm. Meaning, if a self-driving scooter is unavailable for a person, an autonomous golf cart could be provided instead.The research team also surveyed people about their opinions of autonomous vehicles. Before getting on the scooter, passengers were asked how safe they thought self-driving vehicles are. After taking a ride on the scooter, they were asked the same question again. Their average safety rating went up. This scooter research project at MIT clearly shows how easily the team could use their modular hardware and software system for new ideas in the future.last_img read more

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Eating Your Cake and Having It!

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 1, 2011June 20, 2017By: Onikepe Oluwadamilola Owolabi, Young Champion of Maternal HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This blog post was contributed by Onikepe Oluwadamilola Owolabi, one of the fifteen Young Champions of Maternal Health chosen by Ashoka and the Maternal Health Task Force at EngenderHealth. She will be blogging about her experience every month, and you can learn more about her, the other Young Champions, and the program here.December was an awesome month with much better weather in Mumbai than when I arrived. I can now read Hindi script and I attended a course in Hyderabad, courtesy of my mentor, where I learned a lot about myself and enjoyed the fantastic Arab cuisine. I also had a fantastic Indian Christmas and an even better new year which I spent with Hellen Kotlolo, my Young Champion colleague working in Ahmedabad.Work was fast paced this month, but so much fun. I completed my evaluation report of SNEHA’s community resource centers and for the New Year I’m starting a new project, which combines so many of the different things I’m interested in and involves creating and testing a sustainability plan for our 4 community resource centers as their donor funding ends this year.The Young Champions project and Ashoka as a whole have piqued my interest, because it sees a future for two worlds I hitherto hadn’t understood the balance between: charity/philanthropy and profit-making/business. In my early days of exploring the concept of social entrepreneurship (which was relatively new to me), I started to look at the fields of development, funding, research, and business very differently, and every time I did a web search, Ashoka was at the forefront of this interesting field. In social enterprises, I found an area where people with diverse skills and interests could come together to build models of change that could actually help people to live and make a living, make immense profit (social and financial), and try out a whole new combination of things to reduce the reliance of the field of development solely on external donor funding, and help the business world make relevant social profit.Now I know that there is no magic equation for sustainability, and that balancing all the kinds of profit needed to keep ventures running for an NGO is a huge task. But I love the fact that we can try, and that I’m working on a plan to make SNEHA’s community resource centers sustainable.I’ve written out some ideas, divided my plan into different important bits, I’m planning a community market survey and focus group discussions, and I’m terribly excited and scared. My question is: can we pull this off? Can we sustain the drive for maternal health in the slums, help the community to commit small sums to this venture to help with some overhead costs for the center’s operation, and help a good number of women to improve their livelihoods from businesses woven around the center?Most of my childhood I remember being told, “You can’t eat your cake and have it!” But in the world of social entrepreneurship I think I can, and it’s a terribly exciting feeling. I’m working with a great team of people, and I’m looking forward to testing out our strategies and seeing how they work. I know it’ll take some time to get it right, but I look forward to seeing it work.Share this:last_img read more

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WhatsApp makes group chats more secure gives users more control

first_imgNew Delhi: WhatsApp Wednesday said it will now allow its users to decide whether they want to get added to groups on the instant messaging platform. The move assumes significance, especially ahead of elections in the country, as social media platforms are expected to play a major role in political campaigns to reach out to citizens in large numbers. “WhatsApp groups continue to connect family, friends, coworkers, classmates and more. As people turn to groups for important conversations, users have asked for more control over their experience,” the Facebook-owned company said in a statement. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details The messaging app has added that a new privacy setting in which an invite system will help users decide who can add them to groups. Previously, WhatsApp users could be added to groups without their consent. To enable the feature, users can go to ‘settings’ option in WhatsApp app and select one of three options — nobody, my contacts, or everyone. If they choose nobody , users will have to approve joining every group to which they are invited. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from Thursday Upon choosing my contacts option, users from the person’s address book will be able to add them to groups. In these cases, the person inviting you to a group will be prompted to send a private invite through an individual chat, giving the user choice of joining the group. The user will be given three days to accept the invite before it expires, the statement said. “With these new features, users will have more control over the group messages they receive,” WhatsApp said. These new privacy settings will begin rolling out to some users starting Wednesday, and will be available worldwide in the coming weeks to those using the latest version of WhatsApp, it added. WhatsApp, which counts India as one of its largest markets with over 200 million users, had faced flak from the Indian government after a series of mob-lynching incidents, triggered by rumours circulating on the messaging platform, claimed lives last year. Under pressure to stop rumours and fake news, WhatsApp had last year restricted forwarding messages to five chats at once. It has also been putting out advertisements in newspapers and running television and radio campaigns offering tips to users on how to spot misinformation. With ensuing general elections, the Indian government had warned social media platforms of strong action if any attempt was made to influence the country’s electoral process through undesirable means. One of the amendments being mulled in the IT intermediary rules (meant for online and social media platforms) will require them to enable tracing out of such originators of information as needed by government agencies that are legally authorised. However, WhatsApp has so far resisted the government’s demand for identifying message originators, arguing that such a move would undermine the end-to-end encryption and the private nature of the platform, creating potential for serious misuse.last_img read more

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Over 2000 matches held in 201819 domestic season BCCI

first_imgNew Delhi: The Indian domestic season 2018-19, participated in by state associations, finished on a high with the conclusion of the women’s U-23 Challenger Trophy final in Ranchi. While the Indian Premier League (IPL) final will officially conclude the Indian cricket season 2018-19, the current domestic season marked many a first in the history of Indian cricket. For the first time ever, the Indian domestic season witnessed as many as 2024 matches involving 37 teams amounting to 3444 match days as compared to 1032 matches involving 28 teams amounting to 1892.5 match days in the 2017-18 season, stated a BCCI media release. Also Read – We will push hard for Kabaddi”s inclusion in 2024 Olympics: Rijiju “The scheduling of tournaments ensured leaner tournament window and reduced operational encumbrances of longer tournament windows. It’s a whopping 81 per cent jump in match days, which was accommodated with just a 21 per cent increase in season window,” the release added. 13015 player registrations were received throughout the season, while 6471 players participated in the 2018-19 season. Over 100 cities across India hosted senior as well as different age-group matches, stated the cricket board. The BCCI also said that it engaged the services of 170 video analysts and as many scorers, who ensured every game was scored live on the official website.last_img read more

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Ohio lacrosse team helps set world record

Ohio’s newest professional sports team, the Ohio Machine of Major League Lacrosse, has already made a record-setting contribution to the Columbus community. The Machine organized the largest lacrosse game ever played with 112 people Wednesday at Columbus Commons, setting a new world record for the largest documented lacrosse game in history. There was no previously documented record. Guests were invited to bring their own lacrosse sticks and play with the professionals that make up the first-year MLL franchise. Those who registered for the game were given a complimentary Ohio Machine T-shirt in either blue or red and a number. After registration, players tossed the ball around with kids, and just after noon, players and fans took the field. Matt Hastings, director of ticket sales for the Machine, said becoming a part of the community is what the new franchise is all about. “We want to introduce lacrosse to the community and make this a fun league that they can enjoy and connect with,” he said. “And we’re doing that by hosting stuff like this and teaming up with other teams in Columbus.” Former Columbus Crew player Frankie Hejduk, who recently returned to the team in the role of brand ambassador, was there to join in on the action. “It was fun. I had a blast,” Hejduk said. “It’s great to get out here in the community and promote a new team and sport.” Hejduk, who said he has never played lacrosse, emulated his sport of choice as he ran down the field with the ball in the net of his stick before picking it out with his hand and punting it down the field. “It’s kind of a similar sport to soccer,” he said. “You have to put the ball in the back of the net.” Machine attackman and former Ohio State player, Mario Ventiquattro, said the experience was surreal. “This experience is unbelievable,” he said. “It was so great to see all the kids and adults out here running up and down the field with us. It was just a blast.” Ventiquattro said he doesn’t think introducing the city of Columbus to the sport will be too difficult. “Lacrosse is the fastest growing sport in the world right now,” he said. “It’s not hard to have people pick up a stick and fall in love with the game. And I know as soon as people are exposed to the game, it will take off.” And the sunny, 75-degree weather made the event a “10,” Hastings said. “Whenever you have a bunch of kids and even adults smiling, I’d say it was really successful,” he said. “With this weather on top of it, I’d have to give it a 10.” The Machine will host the Rochester Rattlers in their home opener at 8 p.m. on Saturday at Selby Stadium in Delaware, Ohio. read more

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Urban Meyer Ohio State football get their men on National Signing Day

OSU assistant head coach and co-defensive coordinator Everett Withers did not know what school Vonn Bell, a five-star safety from Rossville, Ga., would sign to play for on Wednesday. Withers did, however, make a request to Bell’s head coach from Ridgeland High School, Mark Mariakis, on Tuesday night.“I said, ‘Coach, if it’s going to be a good phone call, make sure (OSU) coach (Urban) Meyer gets it. If it’s going to be a bad phone call, just call me,’” Withers said he told Mariakis.Meyer said he received a call from Bell, whose recruitment Meyer called a “street fight” with Tennessee and Alabama, two minutes before Bell announced his decision to become a Buckeye in a televised press conference.Bell was one of 19 recruits who faxed their letter of intent to OSU on Wednesday – National Signing Day – joining five already enrolled members of a 2013 recruiting class that ranks among the nation’s best.“It was a great day,” Meyer said. “I thought it was going to be a very good day, but I’d put it in the great category.”Most of the players who signed Wednesday had already made verbal commitments to OSU, but Meyer said he came into the week with three targets not yet committed to the Buckeyes: Bell, James Clark and Dontre Wilson.Wilson, a running back/wide receiver from DeSoto, Texas, who had previously committed to Oregon, announced his verbal commitment to the Buckeyes on Monday. Clark, a wide receiver from New Smyrna Beach, Fla., committed to OSU on Wednesday. Wilson and Clark are both rated as four-star recruits by both Scout.com and Rivals.com.The final recruit to fax his letter of intent Wednesday was Ezekiel Elliott, a running back from St. Louis, Mo., who became the 24th official member of the recruiting class when he reaffirmed his commitment during a 5 p.m. press conference Wednesday.Elliott is also considered a four-star prospect by Rivals and Scout.Bell, Wilson, Clark and Elliott are among the 13 signed recruits in the Buckeyes’ 2013 recruiting class from outside the state of Ohio. Ten of those recruits were players who signed their letters of intent Wednesday, also including tight end Marcus Baugh (Riverside, Calif.), defensive lineman Joey Bosa (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.), offensive lineman Tim Gardner (Indianapolis), defensive lineman Michael Hill (Pendleton, S.C.), linebacker Trey Johnson (Lawrenceville, Ga.) and linebacker Mike Mitchell (Plano, Texas).Three of the Buckeyes’ five early-enrollees – cornerback Eli Apple (Voorhees, N.J.), quarterback J.T. Barrett (Wichita Falls, Texas) and defensive end Tyquan Lewis (Tarboro, N.C.) – are also from outside Ohio.The Buckeyes also have 11 signed recruits from within the state of Ohio, including nine who signed Wednesday: athlete Gareon Conley (Massillon), athlete Darron Lee (New Albany), offensive lineman Evan Lisle (Centerville), wide receiver Jalin Marshall (Middletown), defensive lineman Donovan Munger (Shaker Heights), defensive lineman Billy Price (Austintown), wide receiver Corey Smith (Akron), defensive back Jayme Thompson (Toledo) and safety Christopher Worley (Cleveland). Cornerback Cam Burrows (Trotwood) and defensive end Tracy Sprinkle (Elyria) enrolled earlier this semester.OSU took advantage of a national footprint in this year’s recruiting, with seven recruits from states along the eastern seaboard, three from Texas and one each from Indiana, Missouri and California. Meyer, however, said the coaching staff’s focus is still on the state of Ohio.“We recruit Ohio,” Meyer said. “I would rather get, probably, another three or four from the in-state from now on.”Offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Tom Herman said being associated with Meyer and OSU is a recruiting advantage throughout the nation.“It’s not challenging when you go 12-0 and Urban Meyer’s your head coach and you’re wearing the Block ‘O’ on your shirt,” Herman said. “Those three things certainly help you (in recruiting).”With their 24 commits, which is one scholarship below the limit of 25 for the recruiting class, the Buckeyes’ recruiting class is ranked No. 1 nationally by Scout and No. 2 nationally by Rivals as of Wednesday night. The Buckeyes have two five-star recruits, 16 four-star recruits and six three-star recruits, as rated by Rivals.Meyer said the Buckeyes were “just trying to find the best players possible,” but added that there was an emphasis on finding players with speed.“This year was a concerted effort to go find fast guys,” Meyer said.Meyer said the coaching staff emphasizes finding players who are ready to contribute immediately as freshmen.“Really, we don’t redshirt here at Ohio State,” Meyer said. “We want to go recruit guys that are ready to go jump in the fire and want to go play as soon as they can.”With that said, Herman emphasized that the coaching staff should focus first on developing returning players before counting on immediate contributions from their recruits.“To say that we’re going to rely on all these guys, as excited as we are, would certainly be putting our eggs in the wrong basket,” Herman said. read more

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Dontre Wilson transitioning to starting Hback during Ohio State football spring practice

Sophomore running back Dontre Wilson (2) catches the ball during spring practice March 20 at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center.Credit: Mark Batke / For The LanternSpeed isn’t something that can be taught. Usain Bolt trains harder than most people, but if it weren’t for his natural talents, you likely wouldn’t know him as the fastest man in the world.For the Ohio State football team — and coach Urban Meyer’s offensive system — to work effectively, someone with this natural ability was needed.Enter sophomore running back Dontre Wilson.Although Wilson saw time during his freshman year as a change-of-pace running back, who would beat defenders around the corner on kickoffs and quick dump-off passes, it wasn’t in the position Meyer first envisioned for Wilson when he recruited him.Now with a season under his belt in Meyer’s system, Wilson is primed to step in as the Buckeyes’ H-back, the flex spot the offense needs for that extra element.“He’s a starting H,” Meyer said Tuesday. “He took (wide receiver Corey) ‘Philly’ Brown’s spot, so he’s a full-time receiver. We did take him today and put him in some backfield action. We use that term, (Seattle Seahawks wide receiver) Percy Harvin, very loosely, because there’s only probably one of him. But we’d like (it if) that hybrid position is really a key guy if we can do that … by far, Dontre’s the No. 1 spot.“He’s the starting H at Ohio State.”The H-back is a hybrid position that is capable of running out of the slot as a wide receiver while offering a threat rushing the ball around corners. The position made famous by Harvin, who played under Meyer at Florida.Last season Wilson finished fifth on the team in receiving yards and sixth on the team in rushing yards, as a part of the running back corps.But offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Tom Herman said Wilson has moved to more of a wide receiver role from last season, and has continued learning the offense in the process.“He couldn’t play receiver last year, he didn’t know what the hell he was doing. Didn’t know how to do it,” Herman said Tuesday. “He was 175 pounds or whatever the heck he was. So him and his ability limited us, and ability doesn’t just include running fast and making guys miss. There’s a lot that goes into ability and usability in the offense. (He) has had a great offseason and really took to the position and is still learning.”But despite the growth of the young player, Herman said there are still mistakes that need to be ironed out as Wilson continues his transition to H-back.“He still makes mistakes that you wish he wouldn’t at this stage in his career. But at the end of the day, he’s played tailback his entire life and to move him into this hybrid role, he hadn’t been doing it very long,” Herman said. “He wasn’t an early enrollee last year. He didn’t get here until August or June … so he’s progressing, and he’s gotten stronger and bigger and learned technique. So the ability, his usability, continues to rise with every step he takes in terms of learning how to play the position.”Even from the start of his career at OSU, Wilson was not scared of the spotlight, spending all season as one of the starting kick returners alongside former running back Jordan Hall.Running backs coach Stan Drayton said that sort of confidence is what will help Wilson thrive as a football player.“He knows what he’s doing, he’s starting to really take ownership of that position, he’s asking the right questions,” Drayton said March 20. “The one thing about Dontre, Dontre walked through the door with a mentality, he ain’t scared of anything now. He is not a shy person at all, he will ask a dumb question and not feel bad about it and we encourage that … So as long as he keeps that mindset, he’s going to continue to grow as a football player and because of that, he has.”Meyer said having Wilson, along with other speedy players like redshirt-freshman wide receiver Jalin Marshall, to pass the ball quickly to will be vital for an inexperienced offensive line that is losing four starters.“That’s where the Dontres and Jalin Marshalls (take) little bubble screens,” Meyer said. “We’re going to have to take the pressure … We’re going to have to lean on some perimeter ways of getting first downs and all that where, last year, when you rushed for 300 yards in a game, it’s because (of) that offensive line. We have other weapons. It will be a difficult little taste to it than what we had last year.”Wilson and the Buckeyes are set to take the field Aug. 30 against Navy at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. Kickoff is scheduled for noon. read more

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