Radio Host Harry Hurley to Speak Saturday at Ocean City Community Association

first_imgHarry HurleyThe Ocean City Community Association meeting on Saturday (Sept. 20) will feature guest speaker WPG-AM 1450 radio host Harry Hurley.The well- known talk show host will  address the current economic conditions in our region as they affect all of us, and potential concepts that could affect our region in a positive way — spurring new growth.The meeting is open to the public and will begin at 9:30 a.m. in the Ocean City Free Public Library’s lecture hall (17th Street and Simpson Avenue).last_img

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UW lets game slip away in final minutes; Purdue steals victory with crucial boards

first_imgWith 1:20 to play in the game, Alyssa Karel hit a jumper, answering a Lakisha Freeman jumper on the other end and bringing the Kohl Center crowd to its feet.The Badgers and their fans were beginning to sense victory, even after their lead had slipped from 11 points with 14:27 remaining in the second half.Unfortunately for the cardinal and white, they struggled over the next 80 seconds, failing to convert at the free-throw line and leaving Purdue guard Brittany Rayburn all alone beyond the arc for the game-winning shot.“I thought our players played outstanding for 39 minutes, they really did,” UW head coach Lisa Stone said. “They gave tremendous effort, played great defense, executed offensively probably the best we have all year … and I thought we got Purdue’s best.”Wisconsin failed, however, to finish the game — something that’s been a persistent problem since the beginning of the Big Ten season.UW has lost seven games in conference play by an average of six points, including four losses by three or fewer points. In recent losses, the Badgers have often led late in the half before letting the game slip away in the final minutes.“These past couple games we’ve lost it’s just been at our fingertips, and the fact that we can’t close them is a bad feeling in your gut,” Karel said. “I think in the next game we’ve just got to use that bad feeling to fuel us and come out and get a win.”The loss extended the Badgers’ losing streak to a season-long three games. The streak began on the road at Penn State, where Wisconsin fell at the buzzer in overtime despite having a 17-point lead late in the game.In spite of coming out on the losing end for their third consecutive game, Wisconsin still impressed Purdue head coach Sharon Versyp.“Wisconsin is playing great basketball,” Versyp said. “They’re just on the verge of just turning the corner. I have a lot of respect for Lisa and her staff and her team.”Although the Badgers remain positive and confident they are playing as well as they have all season, they’re closing in on a point in the season where moral victories no longer carry much weight.Only seven games remain on the schedule for UW prior to the Big Ten Tournament and four of the seven are on the road, a place the Badgers have struggled to win all season.“We’re right there. We are right there,” Stone said.Purdue grabs crucial offensive rebounds Offensive rebounds are not usually the most memorable plays in a basketball game. In fact, it is often a stat that goes overlooked by most people.For Purdue, however, offensive rebounds made the difference Thursday night.With the Boilermakers’ size, it came as no surprise that they outrebounded the Badgers 30-28 in the game. What was surprising, though, was Wisconsin’s ability throughout most of the game to keep Purdue off the offensive boards.Through the first 36 minutes of play, the Boilermakers went without an offensive rebound. Yet, over the next four minutes, Purdue got four crucial rebounds on the offensive end, including one that allowed them to take a 52-51 lead with 7.6 seconds remaining.Following a miss inside, Danielle Campbell got her own rebound before kicking it out to Rayburn on the wing for the 3-pointer.“We gave up no offensive rebounds, until, I think, three or four minutes left to go in the ball game,” Stone said. “We gave up four down the stretch and that hurt us.”Over a stretch in which a defensive stop and rebound could have sealed the game for UW, the Boilermakers found a way to come up with the offensive board and got all five of their second-chance points in the last two minutes of play.“We talked in the last timeout about one stop and one rebound and it’s ours,” Stone said. “Unfortunately, they came up with four offensive rebounds.”last_img read more

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Meghan wins by eight in USA

first_img26 Feb 2015 Meghan wins by eight in USA England international Meghan MacLaren swept away from the field to score an eight-shot win – and her fifth victory on the US women’s college circuit. The British stroke play champion was 11-under par for two rounds of the JU Amelia Island Collegiate in Florida and was declared the winner when the final round was abandoned after heavy rain flooded the greens. Meghan, 20, set a personal best and a course record with her first round 64, which was eight under par. Remarkably it included a double bogey, on the par four 16th, alongside eight birdies and an eagle. She shot 69 in the second round. Megan, from Wellingborough in Northamptonshire, is a third-year student at Florida International and this is her fifth college win. Meanwhile, Devon’s Jess Bradley has reached the end of a remarkable run of results in US college golf. Jess, a 22-year-old student at Lynn University in Florida and a member at Tiverton Golf Club in Devon, scored 18 consecutive top ten finishes in NCAA Division II events. Her run finally came to an end in the Lady Moc Golf Classic in Florida when she was 19th. It was the first time since May 2013 that Jess had finished outside the top 10 – and only one other player in Division II has ever had a longer top 10 run. During her college career Jess has had six victories, most recently in February when she won the World Golf Invitational for the second year in a row.last_img read more

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RFH Tower Players Present ‘Jekyll & Hide’

first_imgThe Tower Players of Rumson-Fair Haven Regional High School invite you to discover what’s behind the façade as they present Jekyll & Hyde: The Musical, a tale of the epic battle between good and evil based on the classic novella by Robert Louis Stevenson. Set in Victorian London, Dr. Henry Jekyll has a plan to cure his comatose father. Denied by the Hospital Board of Governors, he resolves to experiment on himself.Jekyll & Hyde ran on Broadway for four years. The Tower Players production, directed by Suzanne Sweeney with vocal director Vincent Mottern, features Harrison Best as Jekyll/Hyde, joined by Clare Fitzgerald as Lucy, and Mallory McGill as Emma Carew.Performances are 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, March 23-24 and 1 p.m. Sunday, March 25 in the school auditorium, 74 Ridge Rd., Rumson.Tickets are $10 for adults and $6 for students and senior citizens.The box office is located in the auditorium lobby and will open 90 minutes prior to each performance. Advance ticket forms can be found at the Rumson and Fair Haven libraries or can be downloaded from the school website RFHRHS.org.For information on ticket availability and additional box office hours call (732) 842-1597 ext. 300.last_img read more

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Killjoys play host to Babes during only stop of West Kootenay Roller Derby Saturday at NDCC Arena

first_imgSaturday’s opening West Kootenay Roller Derby tilt at the NDCC Arena in Nelson promises to be a grudge match of the ages.That’s because the last time Salmo’s Babes of Brutality and Nelson Killjoys met, the Heritage City squad came out the winner thanks to a technical error.“It is custom in the sport of roller derby to go over the officials paper work after a close bout to check that the score was added up correctly,” a Killjoys team spokesperson said of Saturday’s West Kootenay Roller Derby Doubleheader beginning at 5 p.m. in the NDCC Arena in Nelson.“Low and behold there was discrepancy between the score board and the official paper work and the Killjoys reversed the final score by two points and took the win away from the celebrating Babes of Brutality.”The doubleheader is the only stop for the West Kootenay Roller Derby circuit has in Nelson. The night kicks off at 5 p.m. with the Killjoys hosting the Babes of Brutality.“Well if you were able to catch the last match up between the Babes and The Killjoys you would know that it was an all out grudge match,” a statement on the WKRD website said.At 7 p.m., the Slocan Valley Vendettas meet Castlegar Dam City Rollers.“This match is going to pretty much dictate the standings of the league,” a statement on the WKRD website said.“Game three for the Dams with two loses they need to win this bout. If (Dam City) lose its good by to the playoffs and time to start thinking about . . . after parties.”Tickets for can be purchased at Phat Angel or by going to http://www.kootenayrollerderby.comNext action on the WKRD circuit is (Saturday) June 29 when Rossland/Trail Roller girls host Mountain Town Maulers of Cranbrook.Bout time is 6 p.m. in Trail’s Cominco Arena.The West Kootenay Roller Derby League has five teams from Nelson, Trail/Rossland, Castlegar and the Slocan Valley. See the MVP’s of the month at http://www.kootenayrollerderby.com/2013/06/mvp-of-the-month/last_img read more

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Mallard’s Team of the Week — NYS U18 Selects

first_imgThe Nelson U18 Selects lost a tough one, 2-0 to Chilliwack in the final of the BC Soccer Girl’s Provincial B Cup Sunday in the South Okanagan City.The Silver Medal was the second time in two seasons the same group of players has won hardware against some of the best teams in the province, capturing the Bronze in 2014.Many of the girls played their final youth soccer match Sunday.Staff at Mallard’s Source for sports would like to salute the hard work and dedication of the Nelson Youth Soccer U18 Girl’s with Team of the Week honours.The team includes, manager Tanis Bouchier, Maddie Sternloff, Darian Voisard, coach Justin Willans, Abbie Bouchier-Willans, Paige Lefranc, Daina Shaw, Jena Wheeldon, Tara Yowek, coach Mike Gerun, Hailee Gerun, Kyra Burkhart, Naomi Perkins, Merissa Dawson, Paige Gattafoni, Allie Zondervan and Alex Dehnel. The Heritage City came ever so close to crowning a provincial champion this past weekend in Penticton.last_img read more

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St Thomas top junior boxing champs

first_imgSt Thomas Boxing Club retained their hold on the Jamaica Boxing Board’s Youth and Junior Championships, when they came out ahead of five other gyms at the Stanley Couch Gym last Saturday night, with 12 points. Stanley Couch placed second with seven points, Savanna-la-mar had four points, Bruising Gym and Trench Town scored three each, Sugar Olympic picked up two points and Seaview Gym one point. The championship featured Junior boxers aged 14-15 and Youth Boxers 16 and 17 years. In the junior category, there was a lot of action and the St Thomas team, which is coached by AIBA 1-Star Judge Robert Napier, excelled. Lightweight Anthony Burke was their best boxer and in his bout against Shaquer Dobson from Sugar Olympic, he was dominant and won by TKO after only one minute and 56 seconds of the first round. He was voted the most outstanding junior boxer for this performance. His teammate, Reynaldo Roberts, also had a TKO victory over another boxer from Sugar Olympic Gym, Malachi Baker. The Youth division saw two excellent bouts. Menilik Russell from the Savanna-la-mar Gym won on points over Joshua Forrest Davidson from Seaview Gym, while Shavon Lindo from Bruising Gym, who is a technically sound boxer with a lot of promise, defeated Devenney Patterson from St Thomas on points. Russell was named the outstanding Youth Boxer. In other bouts, Joseph Russell defeated Michael McDonald on points. Shadine Nash defeated Kirkland Clarke on points, Javon Goldson scored a second round TKO victory over Rahmong Chung and Brandon Gordon from St Thomas scored a surprise victory over Daniel Hylton from Stanley Couch, who recently won a silver medal at a development tournament in Guyana.last_img read more

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Liberty Is an Anti-Darwinian Concept

first_imgThe Darwinian worldview that allegedly freed people from ‘religion’ actually enslaves them to the worst kind of tyranny.In the United States today, Americans will celebrate Independence Day with parties, barbecues, and fireworks. Hopefully mixed in with the fun is some appreciation for the founding principles of America:All men are created equalHuman rightsLife, liberty, and the pursuit of happinessLiberty and justice for allE pluribus unum (out of many, one)In God we trustThe American dreamAll of these ideals are profoundly anti-Darwinian. The secular worldview in vogue today, resting on Darwin’s advocacy of nature run by unguided natural processes, cannot derive any of these. In fact, the opposite is true: secularism undermines every one of these, and historically, has fought against them.Darwin and his successors limited all scientific explanation to chance and natural law. The natural law Darwin is famous for was natural selection, which is simply a restatement of the Stuff Happens Law. Natural selection, therefore, gets subsumed within the ‘chance’ category. Chance, we know is not a scientific explanation at all. It means, “The unknown and unpredictable element in any event that has no assignable cause or guidance from a natural law or intelligent category.” As such, it represents the “other” category when natural law is exhausted. It is not a cause. It is not an explanation. It is empty of meaning.Credit: Illustra MediaWhat natural laws are left? Well, there are Newton’s laws of motion. There is universal gravitation. There are the laws of thermodynamics. Toss in Einstein’s relativity and quantum mechanics. You can add any other so-called ‘laws of nature’ into the mix, and you will not find liberty. Or justice. Or equality. None of these physical laws can produce any of the American ideals, because the ideals involved concepts, not particles subject to mathematically-describable forces. To the extent they are mathematically describable, they are not free. Particles must act the way the laws say they will. (For radical empiricists, who describe laws as patterns in experience, they would say particles “do” act the way the laws say, not that they “must” act that way.)There is no liberty in physics. Physicists speak of “free parameters” but those are merely starting conditions. They do not change the deterministic outcomes (except for some quantum effects, which typically operate at the nanometer scale, as in radioactive decay). There is no justice in physics. The laws are as they are. No human is at liberty to change them, or to choose a different universe with different laws to live in.Many Darwinians deny free will. The late William Provine stressed this point. So much for liberty. According to Richard Dawkins, we are pawns of our selfish genes. But do genes have liberty to mold us according to their selfish desires? Of course not; they are particles that ultimately obey the laws of physics, or chance. Liberty is not chance; it is a choice against alternatives—one option, to the exclusion of another. Information can be described that way: a choice to put together certain letters—to the exclusion of others—to convey meaning that an intelligent agent chooses to communicate.Hall of Liberty, Forest Lawn, Hollywood, California (DFC)Because natural selection was often twisted into Social Darwinism, assuming that “survival of the fittest” implied a “struggle for existence,” Darwinian evolution bore much anti-liberty fruit. The genocides of the 20th century, extending into the 19th century, were motivated by Darwin’s “law of nature” (law of the jungle) where, since only the “fittest” survive, it was necessary to prove oneself the fittest by putting down everyone else. Dr. Jerry Bergman has documented outrageous atrocities that Darwinians committed in his books The Darwin Effect and How Darwin Corrodes Morality. There were actually Darwinians (beginning with Darwin himself) who believed that charity to the weak and the poor was against nature, because it undermined survival of the fittest. Some took it upon themselves to exterminate the weak and sick as a duty to nature. Certainly Hitler felt this way, but he was not alone; the communist dictators used the same justification.The Cold War pitted two opposite worldviews against each other: the “free world” led by the Americans who believed in liberty, and the “communist bloc” (or “evil empire” as Reagan called it) who followed Darwinism to its logical conclusions: the view that nature favors the powerful, whether individual or collective. Bergman shows how the Japanese had fallen for Darwinism before World War II. Their belief in “emperor worship” was not religious, but Darwinian. Needless to say, the worst totalitarian dictatorships the world has ever seen relied on Darwinian views.Some will argue that America’s founding fathers were not Biblical creationists, but deists. Some were; some were not. But even the deists like Thomas Jefferson believed in intelligent design and divine providence (see John West argue this at Evolution News). Their deity was not distant and uninvolved. Jefferson penned the consensus of the fathers in the Declaration of Independence drafted July 2, 1776, but proclaimed on July 4: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”Those who are attracted to socialism ignore history at their peril. With Darwinian dictators, you only get one vote, one time.The Liberty Bell in Philadelphia is inscribed with the words of Leviticus 25:10, “Proclaim LIBERTY Throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants Thereof.” If you desire liberty, follow Jesus Christ. He quoted Isaiah 61 in the synagogue in Nazareth, expressing his heart for man’s welfare, while identifying with God—thereby claiming deity and expressing the heart of God the Father as well: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed” (Luke 4:18).Detail of mosaic, Liberty Hall, Forest Lawn, California (DFC)(Visited 502 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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South Africa’s JSE expands to Cape Town

first_img26 January 2016The Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) is opening a new office in Cape Town so it can enhance its service to clients, build and strengthen relationships and provide accessible support to the market.The city has increased its footprint in the financial services sector and has become an important hub in the industry.JSE capital markets director Donna Oosthuyse described the Mother City has a major centre for global and local institutional investors as well as listed companies.“Being the second largest economic hub of South Africa, and the head office base of many institutional clients and an increasing number of member firms and brokers, an office in the city is a logical part of the JSE’s client strategy,” she said.#JSE aims to build and strengthen relationships and provide accessible support to the market from its new office in Cape Town.— JSE (@JSE_Group) January 20, 2016The new office will be used for all JSE-related activities and events held in Cape Town and it will be headed by senior capital markets specialist, Maryke Vreulink.Source: JSElast_img read more

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Western Ohio cropland values and cash rents 2016-17

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio cropland values and cash rental rates are projected to decrease in 2017. According to the Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents Survey, bare cropland values in western Ohio are expected to decrease from 4.4 to 8.2% in 2017 depending on the region and land class. Cash rents are expected to decline from 1.4% to 4.2% depending on the region and land class. Ohio cropland values and cash rentOhio cropland varies significantly in its production capabilities, and consequently cropland values and cash rents vary widely throughout the state. Generally speaking, western Ohio cropland values and cash rents differ from much of southern and eastern Ohio cropland values and cash rents. The primary factors affecting these values and rates are land productivity and potential crop return and the variability of those crop returns. Soils and drainage capabilities are the two factors that most influence land productivity, crop return and variability of those crop returns.Other factors impacting land values and cash rents are field size and shape, population density, ease of access, market access, local market prices, potential for wildlife damage, field perimeter characteristics, and competition for rented cropland in a region. This fact sheet summarizes data collected for western Ohio cropland values and cash rents. 2017 study results The Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents study was conducted from February through April in 2017. The opinion-based study surveyed professionals with a knowledge of Ohio’s cropland values and rental rates. Professionals surveyed were farm managers, rural appraisers, agricultural lenders, OSU Extension educators, farmers, landowners, and Farm Service Agency personnel.The study results are based on 120 surveys returned, analyzed and summarized. Respondents were asked to group their estimates based on three land quality classes: average, top, and poor. Within each land-quality class, respondents were asked to estimate average corn and soybean yields for a five-year period based on typical farming practices. Survey respondents were also asked to estimate current bare cropland values and cash rents negotiated in the current or recent year for each land-quality class. Survey results are summarized for western Ohio with regional summaries (subsets of western Ohio) for northwest Ohio and southwest Ohio. Factors affecting cash rental ratesUltimately, supply and demand of cropland for rent determines the cash rental rate for each parcel. The expected return from producing crops on a farm parcel and the variability of that return are the primary drivers in determining the rental rates. Many of the following factors contribute to the expected crop return and the variability of that return. Secondary factors may exist and could affect potential rental rates. These secondary factors are also listed.Expected Crop ReturnRent will vary based on expected crop return. The higher the expected return, the higher the rent will tend to be.Variability of Crop ReturnLand that exhibits highly variable returns may have rents discounted for this factor. For example, land that is poorly drained may exhibit variability of returns due to late plantings during wet springs.Factors Affecting Expected Crop Return and Variability of Crop Return:Land (Soil) Quality: Higher quality soils translate into higher rents.Fertility Levels: Higher fertility levels often result in higher cash rents.Drainage/Irrigation Capabilities: Better surface and sub-surface drainage of a farm often results in better yields and higher potential cash rent. Likewise, irrigation equipment tied to the land will allow for higher yields, profits and rents.Size of Farm/Fields: Large farms/fields typically command higher average cash rent per acre due to the efficiencies gained by operators.Shape of Fields: Square fields with fewer “point rows” will generally translate into higher cash rents as operators gain efficiencies from farming fields that are square.Previous Tillage Systems or Crops: Previous crops and tillage systems that allow for an easy transition for new operators may enhance the cash rent value.Field Border Characteristics: Fields surrounded by tree-lined fencerows, woodlots or other borders affecting crop growth at the field edge will negatively impact yield and therefore should be considered in rental negotiations.Wildlife Damage Potential: Fields adjacent to significant wildlife cover including woodlots, tree lined fencerows, creeks, streams, and such may limit production potential to border rows and should be considered in rental negotiations.Secondary Factors Affecting Rental Rates:Buildings and Grain Storage Availability: Access to machinery and grain storage may enhance the value of the cropland rental rate.Location of Farm (Including Road Access): Proximity to prospective operators may determine how much operators are willing to bid for cash rents. Good road access will generally enhance cash rent amounts.USDA Farm Program Measurables: Farms that participate in the USDA Farm Program and have higher “program yields” may command higher cash rents than non-program farms.Services Provided by Operator: Operators that provide services such as clearing fence rows, snow removal and other services may be valued by the landowner. This may even be a partial substitute for cash rent compensation.Conditions of Lease: Conditions placed on the lease by the landowner may result in fewer prospective operators and a lower average cash rent.Payment Dates: Leases that require part or all of the rent to be paid early in the year (up-front) may result in lower rental rates due to higher borrowing or opportunity costs for the operator.Reputation of Landowner/Operator: Reputations of the parties may play a part in the cash rental negotiations. A landowner with a reputation of being difficult to work with may see cash rents negatively affected by this reputation. Farmers with a similar negative reputation may have to pay higher rents.Special Contracts: Farms with special contract commitments may restrict the operator from changing crops based on market conditions. This may negatively impact cash rents. There may also be contracts that positively affect cash rents such as high value crop contracts or contracts for receiving livestock manure.To access the complete summary go to:https://farmoffice.osu.edu/farm-management-tools/farm-management-publications/cash-rentslast_img read more

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