Budget Irish airline Ryanair has taken a risk in r

first_imgBudget Irish airline Ryanair has taken a risk in raising check-in baggage and airport check-in fees, but hopes customers will be given the incentive to travel lighter, rather than to go elsewhere for their flight bookings.The airline has increased its checked-in baggage fee from €6.73 (£5.04) to €8.08 per bag, while its airport check-in fee will rise from €2.69 to €4.04, in a bid to encourage passengers to travel light and use online check-in facilities.Changes at the airline come only weeks after easyJet ignored a relaxing of regulations at 22 UK airports and decided to continue its one hand baggage policy, to the surprise of many. Both airlines look set on convincing passengers of the benefits of travelling with hand luggage only, while refusing to raise the weight or baggage limit for hand luggage – and in Ryanair’s case accompanying this with a sharp rise in hold luggage prices.Spokesman for the budget airline, Peter Sherrard, said: “Ryanair remains determined to encourage more and more passengers to travel with carry-on luggage only. These increased charges will incentivise even more passengers to use our free web check-in service allowing us to cut airport and handling costs and further reduce our guaranteed lowest fares.”ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Map RelatedAer Lingus to increase baggage feesAer Lingus to increase baggage feesRyanair baggage and check-in fees to riseRyanair baggage and check-in fees to riseeasyJet cabin luggage explained and how to maximise your hand baggage allowanceDon’t get caught out by easyJet hand luggage allowances; here are the latest baggage restrictions, plus a few tips on how to avoid paying cabin bag fees:last_img read more

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Silver hairs keep desert ants cool

first_imgSaharan silver ants give new meaning to survival of the fittest. The insects live in one of the hottest deserts on Earth, where temperatures on the surface of the desert sands can reach 70°C. To survive, the ants must keep their bodies below a critical temperature of 53.6°C. Researchers report online today in Science that the ants do so with the help of a coating of silver hairs on their backs and sides (above). The hairs reflect most of the light that hits them. Much of the energy in the visible light that does get absorbed is then converted to longer wavelength infrared light, which is then efficiently radiated away through the hairs. A smooth silver surface along the ants’ bottoms also reflects heat coming up from the sand. Together, these evolutionary adaptations allow the insects to forage in the heat of the day when other insects and lizards are ducking for cover, giving them an advantage that their competitors don’t have.last_img read more

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