Hands RaisED explores police brutality

first_imgSarah Kim | Daily TrojanGet schooled · David Turner, a representative from the Social Justice Learning Institute, explained the school-to-prison-pipeline Thursday.Panelists discussed police influence and brutality inside and outside of classrooms at “Hands RaisED: Policing in the Classroom and on the Streets” on Thursday evening. The event, hosted by USC’s Academic Culture Assembly in cooperation with the USC Black Student Assembly, is part of the ACA’s EdMonth.EdMonth is a month long student-led program dedicated to educating and raising awareness among USC students about the state of education within the United States. EdMonth hopes to bridge the Los Angeles and USC communities and prioritize marginalized students by giving them a platform to face educational inequality directly. Natalie Nguyen, a senior majoring in chemical engineering, coordinated the event and said that the nationwide debate over police tactics in minority communities influenced EdMonth’s decision to focus on educational justice this year.“The purpose of this event is in order to discuss the intersection between police brutality and the school-to-prison pipeline and also build community,” Nguyen said.The panel featured David Turner, a representative from the Social Justice Learning Institute; Tauheedah Shakur, a former Los Angeles Unified School District student and organizer; Shantel Vachani, a professor at the Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work and an education attorney; and Preston Fregia, the unity chair of the BSA. Vachani began the discussion by defining the school-to-prison pipeline and through her experience as an education attorney, how students are being pushed out by the educational system into another system because of disabilities they have induced by mental trauma experienced within their environment. “When a young person acts out because they have an underlying disability or manifestation, at that same time they might have rights in the educational setting,” Vachani said.Fregia expressed his own personal stance on race, racism and police brutality.“When asked a question of how do cases of police brutality outside the classroom affects students of color I answer with: The anger stems from the fact that students of color have to live inside of the illusions of another man’s reality,” Fregia said.Tauheedah Shakur also shared her own experience with racism and the school-to-prison pipeline during her school years at Crenshaw High School. “My peers were treated like they were criminals while they’re in school. Now this affects a lot of people of color. TV shows us that we are nothing but thugs and killers. If TV shows us that, and our homes aren’t good, and school isn’t good, what is supposed to be good? What is supposed to be normal?” Shakur said.Turner took on a more historical perspective. He discussed how the school-to-prison pipeline came into existence. He explained how the phenomena occurred as a response by the government in order to try and deal with the black power movement. “The foundations for what we know as the school-to-prison pipeline were laid by the black power movement,” Turner said. The panel addressed specific issues within LAUSD. The broader implication, as discussed by the panelist, is that these issues can be seen throughout the country and are not singularly a county or state issue. The understanding is that these issues of concentrated disadvantage exist by design and need to be recognized. Subsequently, more needs to be done in order to fix the situation. “If we are really going to advance this idea educational justice, then we have to be really explicit about race,” Turner said.last_img read more

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Community YMCA Announces New Board Leadership

first_imgSHREWSBURY – The Community YMCA Board of Directors has elected Patricia Whittemore as chairperson/chief volunteer officer and Aberdeen “Deen” Allen, Jr. as a new director at the organization’s 139th annual meeting.Whittemore, of Rumson, has been a member of the Y board since 2009 and most recently served as vice chairperson. She has been active with a number of community nonprofit organizations, including the St. George’s Church Outreach Committee and the American Cancer Society. She earned her B.A. at the University of Richmond and holds a master’s degree in public administration from Columbia University. She has three children ages 12, 10 and 8.Allen of Parlin, was appointed for a three-year term on the board of directors. He served in the military and earned a B.S. and a master’s degree from the University of Massachusetts at Boston. He continued his education at Brandeis University where he earned his Ph.D. in synthetic organometallic chemistry. He works for Colgate Palmolive where he continues to make contributions to transform the field of chemistry.last_img read more

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Letter: Witness to Joy

first_imgserved as a Grand Marshal at Brookdale’s graduation ceremonies. It was pure joy.When my favorite poet Billy Collins came to Brookdale some years back, I interviewed him for Brookdale Television, and asked him how he became Poet Laureate. He said it’s a mystery: there’s no short list, you don’t know you’re being considered. You just get a phone call out of the blue from the Librarian of Congress. Then he added, with sly wit, “It’s a good reason to have a telephone.”I thought of that comment as I stood for a couple of hours behind and slightly to the side of President Maureen Murphy as she stood, indefatigably, and greeted hundreds of graduates, one by one, congratulating each, shaking his or her hand, and presenting the tiny vellum scroll tied with a red ribbon that informed them that their actual diplomas would be mailed to them over the summer.Being able to attend a Brookdale graduation – to be offered by your graduate one of the six prized tickets – seems to me today to be a good reason to have a child.Over my 28 years on the faculty, I have dutifully attended many graduations. I admit ruefully that at some point they became a bit ho-hum, always sort of the same, as you might expect. We professors sit in the first few rows, excited and happy for our students as they proceed up a ramp from stage left, keeping an eye out for those we may have had in class among the many we have not. When we spot one, we immediately recall our impressions of that particular student. Then the moment passes, and after the first few hundred, our eyes begin to glaze over a little and we briefly disappear into our own thoughts.But for me, (this) was entirely different – and wondrous. I stood behind a table laden with baskets full of scrolls. One by one, as in a slow-motion relay race, my job was to hand a scroll to my fellow Grand Marshal Gerry Monroy, who passed it off to President Murphy, who put it in the student’s hand. Though I could not see her face, I am certain she was grinning the whole time, because earlier, in the Warner Student Center, as those of us who would be on stage donned our robes and made small talk while we waited to line up, she said to me and Gerry, emphatically, “This is why we do what we do.” She may have said it twice. She was just beaming, brimming with anticipation.I wondered then why she seemed so over the top about it all: another graduation. But very soon I understood: those young adults (and a few not so young) striding confidently toward us, up that ramp, each one’s name having been announced to the multitudes who filled Collins Arena to the rafters, their families gathered in clumps like synonyms in a thesaurus, suddenly and briefly whooping and hollering like all getout for their own, wonderful, accomplished college graduate who was about to be greeted (sometimes hugged) and congratulated by the President of Brookdale Community College. It was joyous. That’s all I can tell you.By Tim Burke.Burke teaches English at Brookdale Community College.last_img read more

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Mushers, fans gather for world’s most famous sled dog race

first_imgView comments Veteran musher Scott Janssen of Anchorage said that for now, he is letting all “the negative stuff go in one ear and out the other,” but will do everything in his power after the race to change the face of the Iditarod.“I run this race because I love the Iditarod and I love my dogs,” said Janssen, a funeral home director known as the Mushing Mortician. “My dogs have been training all year to do this and we’re going to go out there and we’re going to have a great time.”Fans also were concentrating on the race itself. Among them were sisters Liz and Jenny Ott of Bradford, England. The pair first got a desire to see the Iditarod in person after going on a sled dog ride with Iditarod veteran Ryan Redington, grandson of late race co-founder Joe Redington Sr., as part of an Alaska cruise land excursion five years ago.“It’s a bucket list thing,” Liz Ott said.“Something you have to do before you die,” her sister added.ADVERTISEMENT Google honors food scientist, banana ketchup inventor and war hero Maria Orosa LOOK: Iya Villania meets ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ cast in Mexico Families in US enclave in north Mexico hold sad Thanksgiving Michigan ends top-seeded Spartans’ 13-game winning streak But two hours before Saturday’s action got started, a dog on Norwegian musher Lars Monsen’s team got loose and disappeared during preparations for the 11-mile (18-kilometer) run through town. The dog, Hudson, was not immediately found, Iditarod spokesman Chas St. George said.This year’s Iditarod comes amid a plethora of troubles for race organizers, including a former winner’s dog doping scandal, the loss of a major sponsor and increasing pressure from animal rights activists following the deaths of five dogs connected to last year’s race.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutBut on Saturday, the focus for mushers was on the race ahead.“It’s all about the dogs now,” said defending champion Mitch Seavey, a three-time winner. “Dogs are what we focus on. I think that’s why everybody showed up down here on the streets today, it’s because we love the dogs.” Typhoon ‘Tisoy’ threatens Games Musher Aliy Zirkle runs her team during the ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, Saturday, March 3, 2018, in Anchorage, Alaska. Zirkle has finished as high as second in the race. (AP Photo/Michael Dinneen)ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Cheering fans lined the streets as mushers took their dog teams for a short sprint in Alaska’s largest city Saturday for the ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.The morning trek along snow-heaped paths in downtown Anchorage gave supporters a chance to mingle with mushers and their furry teams before the competitive portion of the 1,000-mile (1,600-kilometer) race to Nome begins Sunday to the north in the community of Willow.ADVERTISEMENT John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Read Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university PLAY LIST 01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Pussycat Dolls set for reunion tour after 10-year hiatus Also present for the parade of dog teams were members of the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, which brought five headstones with the names of the Iditarod dogs that died in 2017, including two dogs that died after being dropped from the race. Stuffed toy dogs topped with long-stem red roses were placed in front of the gravestones.PETA, a longtime Iditarod critic, says more than 150 dogs have died in the race over the years, a number disputed by Iditarod officials who have not provided their count despite numerous requests by The Associated Press. PETA also plans to protest at Sunday’s official start of the race and at the finish in Nome.“These dogs are being treated like machines,” said spokeswoman Tricia Lebkuecher. “And they are literally being run to death.”Iditarod officials acknowledged the various problems they’ve faced over the past year have been a growing process for organizers.Perhaps the most challenging issue was the October disclosure that four dogs belonging to four-time winner Dallas Seavey, one of defending champion Mitch Seavey’s sons, tested positive for a banned substance, the opioid painkiller tramadol, after his second-place finish last year behind his father. The race’s leadership faced criticism for not releasing the information sooner.The Iditarod said it couldn’t prove Dallas Seavey administered the drugs to his dogs and didn’t punish him. Since then, the rules have been changed to hold mushers liable for any positive drug test unless they can show something beyond their control happened.Seavey has denied administering tramadol to his dogs. He is sitting out this year’s race in protest over the handling of the doping investigation. Instead, he is in Norway to participate in another sled dog race, the Finnmarkslopet, which begins next week. Mitch Seavey said Dallas called him from Norway Friday night to wish him well in the Iditarod.For this year’s Iditarod, 67 teams are vying for a total purse of $500,000. Organizers say the winner’s share of the prize money will be determined later in the race. LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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Tokyo Games nears collection targets for recycled-metal medals

first_imgOil plant explodes in Pampanga town Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations MOST READ ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes LATEST STORIES US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants View comments FILE – In this April 1, 2017, file photo, gold tablets of 3 grams, left, which is able to be recycled from 100 mobile phones, are shown as example in Tokyo. Tokyo Olympic organizers said in a statement Friday, Feb. 8, 2019, they expect to collect enough obsolete electronic devices by the end of March to reach the amount that will be required to manufacture all Olympic and Paralympic medals. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)TOKYO — The Tokyo metropolitan government and Tokyo Organizing Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games have announced that they are on track to collect the recycled metal needed to produce all medals for the 2020 Games from the remnants of mobile phones and other small electronic devices.The collection is expected to conclude by the end of March.ADVERTISEMENT ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Pelicans balancing Anthony Davis’ playing time with future concerns PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. At least 5,000 medals, including gold, silver and bronze, are needed for the Games. The gold medal will be gold plated over a silver base, with 30.3 kilograms of gold, 4,100 kilograms of silver and 2,700 kilograms of copper required for production.Collection of the metals from discarded small devices began in April 2017. As of the end of June 2018, the organizing bodies had completed their collection of copper but had only obtained 54.5 percent of the gold and 43.9 percent of the silver needed.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesAdditional recycling stations were subsequently introduced. As of the end of last October, the bodies had collected 93.7 per cent of the gold and 85.4 percent of the silver needed. The collection targets for both metals are expected to be reached by the end of March.last_img read more

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WTA Finals: Sloane Stephens beats Naomi Osaka, Kiki Bertens stuns Kerber

first_imgSloane Stephens and Kiki Bertens started their campaigns at the WTA Finals with victories on Monday.Stephens battled past Naomi Osaka 7-5 4-6 6-1 while Bertens stunned Wimbledon champion Angelique Kerber 1-6 6-3 6-4 in the opening matches of the Red Group.Bertens of the Netherlands was the last player to make it into the eight-woman tournament when world number one Simona Halep withdrew through injury.Earlier, a calm Stephens picked her shots to perfection to pull clear for a victory over Japan’s Naomi Osaka in a battle between the last two US Open champions.Stephens and Osaka are making their debuts at the season-ending event, and it was the American who opened Red Group action with a win built on the foundations of solid defence from the baseline and a devastating forehand when she attacked.”I just competed really well and never gave up,” Stephens said in a post-match interview. “I knew I would have to play some really good tennis to beat her, stayed tough and tried to stay as positive as I could and took my opportunities when they presented themselves.””I don’t really have any regrets”@Naomi_Osaka_ is already looking forward to her next @WTAFinalsSG match –> https://t.co/Y5H25ZMevX pic.twitter.com/eqQv3FIVCGWTA (@WTA) October 22, 2018After trading early breaks, the match settled down as the pair enjoyed more success on serve, until Stephens, content to adopt a patient approach from the baseline, broke again in the seventh game when Osaka made a slew of unforced errors.advertisementBut Osaka is not one to back down and the 21-year-old Japanese broke straight back to level the contest at 4-4, thanks to some sublime stroke-making aided by a couple of double-faults from her opponent.After a solid hold from Stephens, Osaka was struggling to contain her emotions as she found the net or went long with her increasingly erratic backhand and the American secured her third break of the match to move a game away from taking the set.TACTICAL SWITCHStephens was growing in confidence as Osaka battled her emotional demons and the American fittingly sealed the opener on her third set point, when the world number four sent another backhand into the net.Osaka changed her tactics at the start of the second set, finding success by drawing Stephens into the court and away from her baseline comfort zone to hold far more comfortably, but the American used her potent forehand to stay in touch.”She’s a great player and playing with a lot of confidence so I knew I had to battle”@SloaneStephens explains the secret to her @WTAFinalsSG win over Naomi Osaka. pic.twitter.com/K4XAoSSEtZWTA (@WTA) October 22, 2018Stephens looked the more composed at that stage, but Osaka dug deep and battled back from 15-40 to hold in the fifth game and came out on top of three breaks of serve to send the contest into a decider when the American double-faulted on set point.The world number six broke immediately at the start of the third set and after Osaka wasted a chance to level things up when she declined to challenge a call that would have been ruled in her favour, Stephens took command of the match.A pair of easy holds and an another break took her to 5-1, and the 2017 U.S. Open winner sealed the contest on her second match point when an anguished Osaka double-faulted for the fourth time in the match.”We played a really tough and competitive match so its always an honour to share the court with somebody that good,” Stephens added.BERTENS’S COME-FROM-BEHIND VICTORYFor the first time in the round-robin format, all four lower seeds won their opening round matches, as Elina Svitolina, Karolina Pliskova and Sloane Stephens all recorded victories in the first matches of the tournament over the first two days.”I’m really happy to get the win here today,” Bertens said on-court after the match. “It was a slow start but I was really happy to turn around this match. I had a little chat with my coach when it wasn’t going so well, so we decided to go a little bit more for my shots, play a little more aggressive and it worked out.” Kiki Bertens of the Netherlands celebrates after beating Angelique Kerber 1-6 6-3 6-4 (AP Photo)The victory is Bertens’ tour-leading 11th over a Top 10 player this season, but she needed to do it the hard way after losing the opening set in just about 30 minutes.advertisementKerber continued to build momentum early in the second set, and ultimately held a 6-1, 2-0 lead in the match before Bertens secured her first break of serve to level proceedings at 2-2.Each woman broke serve six times in the match, and the Dutch World No.9 overcame 12 double faults on her own delivery in the match to secure two key holds in the final [email protected] completes the comeback victory at the @WTAFinalsSG!Gets the win over Kerber 1-6, 6-3, 6-4! pic.twitter.com/qRomp8D8A9WTA (@WTA) October 22, 2018Bertens’ dug out of a 0-40 hole to snap a string of seven straight breaks in the decider – capping the game with one of her five aces for the match – and later sealed the victory with a forehand winner – her 25th finisher in the match overall.(With inputs from Reuters and WTA)last_img read more

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a month agoBurnley fullback Matt Lowton: Excited by season prospects

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Burnley fullback Matt Lowton: Excited by season prospectsby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveBurnley fullback Matt Lowton believes the foundations are in place for a successful season as he prepares to head back to former club Aston Villa.The Clarets are sitting ninth in the Premier League table with eight points from their opening six games.“We finished strong and we wanted to make sure we took that into this season,” said the Clarets’ right-back to Burnley’s website.“We’re very happy with the way we’ve started. We have got a lot of points on the board and but for a late goal at Wolves it could have been a few more.“There’s probably been only one half of football (at Brighton) where we’ve not been where we wanted to be, and we put that right last weekend, so the way we have started we’ve got a great platform to build on.“We didn’t start last season the way we wanted to and we were down the bottom and struggling a little bit. It’s hard to get the results together when you are looking over your shoulder.“The way we have started this time has given us a great platform to kick on and hopefully we can do what we did a couple of seasons ago.” last_img read more

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Euronavs Profit Drops in Year of Two Contrasting Halves

first_imgzoom Following a year of robust fundamentals and aggravated seasonal trading patterns, the Antwerp-based shipping company Euronav reported a drop in its net profit to USD 204 million in 2016 from USD 350.3 million seen in 2015.The company said that 2016 was a year of two contrasting halves as robust fundamentals drove strong market until June but increased vessel supply aggravated seasonal trading patterns until the fourth quarter of the year.Amid such conditions, the company’s revenue for the period decreased to USD 684.3 million from USD 846.5 million reached a year earlier.Although 2016 represented “a very active year” for Euronav, Paddy Rodgers, CEO of Euronav, said that freight rates were impacted negatively from June onwards by increased vessel supply, weak tanker owners sentiment and specific factors such as oil supply disruptions affecting the Suezmax segment.During the fourth quarter of the year, the company’s profit halved to USD 50.2 million compared to a profit of USD 104.8 million seen in the same three-month period a year earlier. Euronav’s revenue for the quarter was also down to USD 146.2 million from USD 225.6 million reported in 2015.Rodgers added that medium- and longer-term prospects for the tanker market “remain constructive, underpinned by a solid recurring demand for crude, structural change in financing likely to constrain future vessel supply growth and a likely acceleration in the retirement of older ships from 2017 onward encouraged by environmental legislation on ballast water treatment and sulfur emissions.”“However, 2017 will, in our view, present a number of challenges: OPEC production cuts, concentrated delivery schedule of the order book and anemic owner confidence, which when combined, are all likely to produce a difficult rate environment for the next few quarters,” Rodgers said.last_img read more

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From weed to wages Ontario marijuana producers hit by minimum pay rate

first_imgTORONTO – Coffee chains and restaurants aren’t the only businesses under pressure from Ontario’s minimum wage hike — marijuana companies say the higher provincial pay rate is driving up the cost to produce and sell cannabis products as well.Licensed medical marijuana producer Aphria Inc. has calculated that the province’s 21-per-cent minimum pay jump from $11.60 to $14 per hour would add another $600,000 to its overall wage costs each year.“If this increase had been in effect in the current quarter, the company’s ‘all-in’ cost of sales of dried cannabis per gram would have increased by approximately $0.12 per gram,” the Leamington, Ont.-based company said in recent financial documents.That’s an increase of nearly six per cent from its all-in cost of $2.13 per gram during the quarter ended in November.Aphria said in its management’s discussion and analysis that when the provincial minimum wage goes up to $15 on Jan. 1 2019, it expects overall company wages to go up by another $300,000 per year.Southern Ontario-based pot producer Newstrike Resources Ltd. said it’s also feeling the financial pressure, and anticipates its all-in costs to sell cannabis will rise by roughly 10 cents per gram due to the provincial wage hike.The province has both relatively high labour costs and electricity costs, which will likely weigh on producers’ decision making when setting up a new facility, said its chief operating officer Kevin Epp.That could mean consumers will pay more for their weed.“For a while, you could probably absorb it by having reduced margins,” Epp said. “But eventually, in any competitive industry, costs have to be passed through or people would exit the industry.”Beacon Securities analyst Vahan Ajamian said the cost increases are meaningful. He added that Ontario’s higher pay rate will make it more difficult for marijuana producers in the province and others with rising minimum wages to compete with those in Quebec, where both labour and power costs are lower.Ontario’s minimum wage hike, which took effect Jan. 1, has already prompted other businesses to adjust how they operate.For instance, some Ontario Tim Hortons’ franchisees eliminated paid breaks, fully-covered health and dental plans and other perks for their workers to offset the added costs. The move drew protests at some of the coffee chain’s Ontario locations earlier this month as well as a few locations in cities across the country.Meanwhile, Freshii chief executive Matthew Corrin said the eatery took steps to help franchisees offset the increase, such as raising prices on some items in the fall ahead of the hike.But not all marijuana producers in Ontario are grappling with rising minimum wage rates — at least, not yet.Beleave Inc.’s chief executive officer Andrew Wnek said its relatively smaller operation is comprised largely of specialized workers who make more than minimum pay.However, he notes, as the Hamilton, Ont-based pot producer grows in scale and additional harvesting staff is required for larger facilities, a higher minimum wage will factor in.“There’ll be an impact for sure,” he said. “But, again, for the smaller LPs at this point in time, they won’t see that until they get into the larger facilities.”Companies in this story: (TSX:APH, TSXV:HIP)Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version identified Kevin Epp as Newstrike’s chief financial officer.last_img read more

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Top 3 poll issues will be jobs jobs jobs Chidambaram

first_imgNew Delhi: Senior Congress leader P Chidambaram on Saturday hit out at the Prime Minister Narendra Modi government over alleged lack of job creation, saying the three main issues in the upcoming general elections would be jobs, jobs and jobs. “What is worse? Not creating jobs or lying about creation of jobs?” Chidambaram asked in a tweet, alleging that the National Democratic Alliance government was guilty of both. “The top three issues in the elections will be jobs, jobs and jobs.” “Glad that CII (Confederation of Indian Industry) has found its voice and has exposed the government’s bogus claims on job creation. Hope that others also will speak up,” the former Union finance minister added. The CII had on Wednesday expressed concern over the country’s job market amid growing challenges of making a generation employment-ready. However, it had on Thursday said the recent reforms ushered in by the government were creating new livelihoods across existing and emerging sectors.last_img read more

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