Pasadena Museum of History Announces Donation of Artwork, Memorabilia from Family of Artist/Educator Nelbert Chouinard

first_img 108 recommendedShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Business News Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Make a comment Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Herbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWeird Types Of Massage Not Everyone Dares To TryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Is What Scientists Say Will Happen When You Eat AvocadosHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Brutally Honest Reasons Why You’re Still SingleHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Hollywood Divas Who Fell In Love With WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeauty More Cool Stuff Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *center_img Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Subscribe Nelbert Murphy Chouinard (1879–1969). Untitled – Landscape, circa 1916. Oil on board, 24 x 20 in. Courtesy of Pasadena Museum of History (Gift of the family of Nelbert M. Chouinard, 2018.013.01)Pasadena Museum of History is pleased to announce the gift of five recently rediscovered works of art by the noted artist and educator Nelbert Chouinard (1879-1969). In addition to original works by Chouinard, the gift also includes family memorabilia and photographs from the Chouinard family. A total of three landscape paintings, two preparatory sketches, and the additional materials will become part of the permanent collection at PMH thanks to the generosity of the Chouinard family and the efforts of art historians and curators Maurine St. Gaudens and Joseph Morsman.The paintings and sketches are currently on view in the Museum’s nationally-acclaimed exhibition, Something Revealed; California Women Artists Emerge, 1860-1960, which runs now through March 31, 2019. “It seems like kismet that led Nelbert’s paintings to this particular Museum,” enthused the artist’s niece, Karen Laurence. “Aunt Nelbert would be so pleased to see her work on the wall in that lovely museum where they seem perfectly at home.”Nelbert Chouinard (born Nelbertina Murphy) played a leading role in the arts community in the development of arts education in Los Angeles; educating a who’s who list of artists, animators, and designers whose work has contributed to and influenced twentieth century. After moving to Pasadena from the East Coast at the age of thirty, she taught at the Polytechnic Institute (now Caltech) under Ernest Batchelder, at the Batchelder School of Design, and at Pasadena’s Polytechnic Elementary School. The artwork she created prior to settling in California and later in her South Pasadena Studio was exhibited nationally, with her first solo exhibition taking place in Pasadena in 1916. Following her marriage to Horace Chouinard in 1916, Nelbert relocated first to Texas and then to Washington, D.C., only to suffer the tragic loss of her husband just two years later.Returning to California, Nelbert was recruited to teach at the Otis Art Institute, Los Angeles. In 1921 she founded the Chouinard Art Institute, which she oversaw until the 1960s. With the establishment of the institute, Chouinard devoted her life to the education and scholarship of generations of artists.Nelbert Chouinard passed away in Pasadena on July 9, 1969; the Chouinard Art Institute was merged with the Los Angeles Conservatory of Music under the auspices of Walt and Roy Disney in 1961 to become the California Institute for the Arts (CalArts), which to this day is recognized as one of the leading art schools in the nation.“We are thrilled to add artwork by Nelbert Chouinard to the Museum’s fine art collection,” notes PMH Executive Director Jeannette O’Malley. “As a significant contributor to the development of arts education in California, Nelbert is the epitome of what Something Revealed represents, and we look forward to sharing her art and legacy in the future.”Pasadena Museum of History is located at 470 W. Walnut St., Pasadena. The exhibition galleries are open 12-5 pm Wednesdays through Sundays unless otherwise noted on the Museum’s website, pasadenahistory.org. Admission is $9 general; $8 students & seniors; free to PMH members and children under 12. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Top of the News top box 5 Pasadena Museum of History Announces Donation of Artwork, Memorabilia from Family of Artist/Educator Nelbert Chouinard From STAFF REPORTS Published on Monday, February 18, 2019 | 1:26 pm EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS First Heatwave Expected Next Week last_img read more

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Crantock’s pasty sales rocket

first_imgCrantock Bakery has announced it has been doing a roaring trade on Cornish pasties during the recession, with sales up 30% on last year.With turnover currently at £15 million, chairman and managing director Nick Ringer said the company has had its best year.“We’ve never been busier,” he added.The Indian Queens-based firm’s turnover has more than quadrupled since the business was bought by the management team in 2002 for £6 million, and it has taken on 70 full time staff in that time, boosting its total to 150 employees.In 2007, a £2m investment in production machinery and freezer storage was completed at its factory, increasing capacity to the enable production of up to 150,000 pasties a day. “You can’t stand still,” said Ringer. “You have to develop new products, new ways of selling and explore new markets. In the last year we have created a new position for a new product development manager, whose sole focus is to create new lines and refine our existing product range.”Crantock supplies to independent pasty shops and bakeries, pasty chain retailers such as Cornish Bakehouse and the Oggy Oggy Pasty Company, and to Morrisons and Asda stores nationwide.last_img read more

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The New Grateful Dead Musical, ‘Red Roses, Green Gold’, Is Opening In October!

first_imgA few months ago, Broadway World announced that a new musical featuring the music of the Grateful Dead was in the works. At the time, the new project was described as “a new musical comedy, featuring the music of THE GRATEFUL DEAD- a semi-fantastical and immersive Americana tale of the Jones family in 1920’s Cumberland, Maryland, as they con, swindle and gamble their way into riches.” During the initial announcement of the project, most of the information about this new Grateful Dead musical was gleaned from the show’s casting call, which confirmed that Dead & Company’s Jeff Chimenti would serve as musical director and Rachel Klein as director.Jackie Greene To Lead Members Of Dead & Co, moe., Twiddle In Charity Grateful Dead TributeYesterday, Rolling Stone shed more light on the project, noting that the new musical will be called Red Roses, Green Gold and that it will open at New York City’s Minetta Lane Theatre in the fall, with previews starting October 11th and the show opening to the public on October 29th. Rolling Stone‘s preview also notes that director Rachel Klein will serve as the choreographer for the project and that Michael Norman Mann wrote the show’s script. Mann is no stranger to Grateful Dead musicals, as the writer has previously penned two projects featuring the Grateful Dead’s music—Cumberland Blues in the late 90’s and Shakedown Street, which opened in 2005.Ahead of Red Roses, Green Gold‘s opening, you can check out the former Equity casting notice for the show, which sheds a little more insight into what to expect from the Grateful Dead musical. Among the list of characters, we have Jack, the cunning family patriarch; Melinda, the beautiful and independent daughter described as “a total lady boss”; Mick (a.k.a. “The Candy Man”), the charismatic and sexy trickster; Jessup, the villainous wealthy mining tycoon; and Dudley, the “lovable, slow-witted son” of the villian, Jessup. Being a Grateful Dead musical, no cast would be complete without a Bertha, who is described as a “firecracker.” And, being a musical in general, no such casting would be complete without a mysterious out-of-towner who rolls through and must win the love of a lady “despite having some secrets.”Watch Full Video Of The Grateful Dead’s Final Performance At Alpine ValleyTickets for Red Roses, Green Gold go on sale starting September 25th at 10 am (EST), though a pre-sale for American Express cardholders will run from September 13th at 10 am through September 20th at 9:59 am and an Audience Rewards pre-sale will run from September 20th at 10 am to September 25th at 9:59 am (EST). Prices for this Grateful Dead-inspired Broadway show will range from $58 to $88 dollars, though premium tickets will be available for $125 dollars.[H/T Rolling Stone]last_img read more

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Pink Talking Fish Honors Tom Petty During 3-Night Run With Special Encore Tune Each Night

first_img[Video: TheKamherst]“Mary Jane’s Last Dance” [Video: nognuisagoodgnu][Photo: Sarah Bourque] Over the weekend, Pink Talking Fish performed a three-night run across the Northeast, with dates at Buffalo, NY’s Buffalo Iron Works on Thursday, October 6th; Rochester, NY’s Funk ‘n Waffles on Friday, October 7th; and Toronto, ON’s The Mod Club on Saturday, October 8th. During these shows, the beloved Pink Floyd, Talking Heads, and Phish tribute group laid out three of their characteristically high-octane shows. However, as a means to pay tribute to the late Tom Petty, the iconic rock star who passed away last Monday, each night, the group encored with a classic Petty tune. In Buffalo, the group ended their Thursday show with a heartfelt rendition of “Free Fallin’”. The next night, the group encored with “You Wreck Me” in Rochester. Closing out their three-night run, Pink Talking Fish ended the final of their three shows with a fiery performance of “Mary Jane’s Last Dance.”How Tom Petty’s “Free Fallin’” Went From A Studio Joke To A Worldwide Smash HitYou can watch Pink Talking Fish’s Thursday and Saturday tributes to Tom Petty below.“Free Fallin’”last_img read more

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Chepe’s Capture Signifies Dramatic Blow against “Los Urabeños”

first_img His capture was conducted when investigators from the Directorate of Criminal Investigation and Interpol (Dijín) intercepted him at Piamonte, Cáceres municipality (Antioquia). Two 9 mm pistols, eight magazines, 110 pistol cartridges and four high-end mobile phones were seized in the operation. Aka “Chepe” is wanted on two arrest warrants; one for aggravated conspiracy, issued by the 23rd Specialized Attorney General Office in Medellín, and the second one for trafficking, manufacturing and carrying drugs and conspiracy, issued by the 280th Attorney General Office in Bogotá, as well as an extradition order issued by the United States for crimes related to drug trafficking. Aka “Chepe,” the arrestee is responsible for the criminal structure in Caucasia, Cáceres, Tarazá, (in Antioquia), Uré, and La Apartada in southern Córdoba. “Chepe,” who was the leader of about 100 men, is attributed the wave of violence that hit these municipalities due to turf wars with members of the criminal gang “Los Rastrojos” over the domination of drug trafficking routes. By Dialogo August 28, 2013 The criminal organization “Los Urabeños” was struck by the Colombian National Police in lower Cauca, Antioquia department, Colombia, with the capture of their main leader, wanted for extradition by the United States, as part of the Strategy to Combat Transnational Organized Crime. According to investigators, aka “Chepe” was in charge of receiving payments for extortions of up to 10% of profits of businessmen, operators, members of the community in general, and miners, who were required to go to clandestine places and pay extortion money.last_img read more

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Cardiff fight back to earn draw

first_imgCardiff Blues courageously fought back for a 24-24 draw at the Sportsground thanks to Sam Hobbs’ controversial 78th-minute try. It was a desperately disappointing finish for Connacht who had started the second half like a train with two rapid tries from Kieran Marmion and Nathan White. Man-of-the-match Craig Ronaldson brilliantly converted both to give the hosts a commanding 24-10 lead, but the westerners’ inexperience told as they allowed Cardiff claw their way back thanks to touchdowns from Macauley Cook and replacement prop Hobbs. It was level-pegging at half-time – 10-10 – after Adam Thomas and Robbie Henshaw had swapped tries and Patchell matched Ronaldson’s five-point kicking haul. Deft hands from Danie Poolman released Willie Faloon for an early break and the flanker got his hands on the ball again before Ronaldson left-footed Connacht into a sixth minute lead. A slashing break by Lewis Jones should have resulted in a Cardiff try but he was stopped just short of the hosts’ line and Cook fumbled the next pass. The Blues – winless since round 1 of the Guinness Pro 12 – coughed up some soft penalties but they pressurised Connacht into lineout errors and a Patchell-led break-out gained the territory for their opening score. Cardiff used scrum possession to attack in midfield before quick ball released full-back Adam Thomas to punish brittle Connacht defending just to the right of the posts. Patchell converted for a 7-3 lead with 20 minutes gone. Connacht were on the back foot until their superior scrum won them a penalty on the half hour and a decision to go for the corner paid off. The resulting maul was stopped but the quick-witted Henshaw – despite being tackled by Cook – managed to stretch for the line and score. Press Association Moloney confirmed their was no double movement and Ronaldson added the conversion. However, a long range Patchell penalty somehow wobbled its way over to equalise by the interval. Pat Lam’s men kicked for territory on the resumption and it paid immediate dividends. Faloon linked with Marmion off the side of a maul and the wily scrum half stepped off his right to beat Dan Fish’s attempted tackle and crash over in the right corner. Ronaldson’s curling conversion added further momentum to Connacht’s charge in wet conditions, and he repeated the trick from the same touchline minutes later. The Blues leaked a third try when a training ground move at a lineout saw Michael Kearney tap down to Quinn Roux and he fed onrushing prop White who squeezed over by the right corner flag. Connacht failed to profit from a couple of close-in set pieces and their bonus point push never really materialised. Muldoon was unable to stop his opposite number Cook from burrowing over for a seven-pointer at the other end. That score provided a lifeline for Mark Hammett’s charges, their renewed energy leading to Hobbs’ effort from a close range drive. Patchell’s conversion kick wiped out Connacht’s lead before the shell-shocked hosts had an ambitious drop goal attempt blocked in the dying seconds. It was a marginal call by TMO Dermot Moloney as he ruled that Hobbs successfully grounded the ball against the left hand post following a mammoth 32 attacking phases from the Blues. Replays suggested that Connacht captain John Muldoon had got his body in the way as the prop stretched out, but the try was awarded and Rhys Patchell converted to draw Cardiff level for a final time. last_img read more

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Trojans edge out Sun Devils, 31-26

first_img“We were really concerned about [Daniels] scrambling, he had a lot of carries out of the pocket,” defensive coordinator Clancy Pendergast said. “[ASU freshman quarterback Joey Yellen] was more of a traditional drop-back passer, and so we alerted the guys when we found out what the situation was going to be. It didn’t really change that many of the calls, just probably played a little bit more split-safety coverages, particularly once we got a lead.” Freshman quarterback Kedon Slovis threw for 432 yards, four touchdowns and an interception in the Trojans’ 31-26 win over Arizona State Saturday. (Photo courtesy of Nigel Amstock / CU Independent) Through the first quarter, it looked like the Trojans — who were routed by Oregon 56-24 last weekend — would have the upper hand this time around. Slovis left the game for much of the third quarter and the beginning of the fourth due to a calf cramp, and redshirt junior Matt Fink led the Trojans to a field goal by redshirt sophomore kicker Chase McGrath. It was USC’s only score after the first quarter. The Trojans are now bowl-eligible after missing out on a bowl appearance last season. However, USC can’t afford complacency in its final two games against Cal and UCLA. Although the Trojans gave up four passing touchdowns to Yellen in his debut, Pendergast said the defense accomplished its main goal — forcing ASU to win through the air. Slovis broke USC’s record for most passing yards in the first quarter with 297. He also had four passing touchdowns in the first frame, including a 58-yarder to freshman running back Kenan Christon and the connection with St. Brown. “It was a lot of fun,” Slovis said of the Trojans’ first quarter performance. “It showed what we can do with this offense when we execute. Later in the game, we did not execute as well. When we execute and everyone does their job, that is what it can look like.” “We wanted to come out here and put our foot down and say, ‘The back is not going to run the ball,’” Pendergast said. “But we were not going to allow them to run the football. They were going to have to beat us throwing the football. And the guys rose up, took the challenge on and I was happy with the numbers.” The black-clad fans at Sun Devil Stadium looked on in horror as USC freshman quarterback Kedon Slovis threw his fourth touchdown pass of the first quarter. Slovis fit a perfect ball between three defenders to sophomore wide receiver Amon-Ra St. Brown for a 95-yard score that gave the Trojans an early 28-7 lead.  The Trojans’ first-quarter dominance was not enough to put the Sun Devils away, though. USC’s offense failed to capitalize on two second-quarter takeaways, including a forced fumble by sophomore safety Talanoa Hufanga and an interception by redshirt sophomore safety Isaiah Pola-Mao.  The Sun Devils had the ball at the Trojans’ 32-yard line with just under a minute left when redshirt senior defensive lineman and team captain Christian Rector tipped a pass before making a diving interception to seal the deal for USC. “It was huge,” Rector said of the Trojans’ win. “Now we are bowl-eligible. It is a big deal, especially after last year. Getting this win is important, especially going forward trying to get these next two.” It looked as though USC had learned from its scoring woes after a disappointing showing against Oregon last weekend. But in the end — after Arizona State outscored the Trojans 19-3 in the final three quarters — USC’s narrow 31-26 victory came down to a takeaway on the final drive. USC was forced to shift its defensive plan after it was announced shortly before game time that ASU freshman quarterback Jayden Daniels, known for his scrambling ability, would not be starting due to a leg injury.  The Trojan defense held ASU to just 1 yard of total offense in the first quarter. The Sun Devils’ sole first-quarter touchdown was set up by a 97-yard kickoff return from ASU senior wide receiver Brandon Aiyuk. Penalties proved costly for both teams. Redshirt sophomore Jay Tufele’s roughing the passer penalty overturned an interception by Hufanga, and ASU’s subsequent touchdown narrowed the Trojans’ lead to 5. The Sun Devils could have taken the lead midway through the fourth quarter when Slovis threw a pick-six, but the play was called back due to a holding penalty on senior linebacker Khaylan Kearse-Thomas. “To come on the road, down bodies, and those kids find a way to win and your captain makes the final play, it’s special,” head coach Clay Helton said. “That’s what captains do. They don’t wait for other people to make it happen. They make it happen, and I thought it was a very special moment for Christian.” Christon appeared more versatile against ASU, tallying 82 yards receiving and getting 20 carries — the most of his young career. After toting 15 carries last week, it appears the coaches are placing more trust in the young back to balance out the pass-heavy Air Raid approach.last_img read more

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