Family of man who died at St Columba’s Hospital bring legal action against HSE

first_img Pinterest Pinterest Facebook DL Debate – 24/05/21 Twitter The family a man who died tragically in St Columba’s Hospital is bringing a High Court action against the HSE. 30-year-old Karl Collins died at the hospital in Sligo on 3 April 2017 after seeking help for anxiety and insomnia, according to RTÉ.Collins, who had been living in Bundoran, presented to St Columba’s on 1 April 2017, RTÉ reported.On 3 April 2017, it’s understood that a nurse found him unresponsive in his room and efforts to resuscitate him failed.An inquest, which returned a verdict of suicide, heard an apology from the HSE.The High Court proceedings were issued on Tuesday 26 March by John Collins against the HSE.John Collins is represented by solicitors O’Connor Johnson.In a statement, the HSE said: “It would be inappropriate for the HSE to comment as the matter is before the court.” Previous articleFunding package announced for heritage sites & projects in DonegalNext articleDiscrimination claims over Irish language during Council business News Highland Twitter WhatsApp Facebook News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Family of man who died at St Columba’s Hospital bring legal action against HSEcenter_img Google+ Harps come back to win in Waterford By News Highland – March 28, 2019 Google+ WhatsApp Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Homepage BannerNews Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODAlast_img read more

Read More »

Hogg gets Glasgow over the line

first_img Press Association Glasgow gained revenge for defeat in last season’s play-offs with a 22-20 Guinness PRO12 win over Leinster at Scotstoun Stadium on Saturday. The game got under way with probably the quickest replacement of the season, in just 42 seconds. The unfortunate man was Leinster centre Noel Reid who went down under a tackle with a leg injury, to be subbed by Ian Madigan. Glasgow centre Mark Bennett missed a long penalty in the ninth minute but the hosts looked the most adventurous in the early exchanges and this approach brought the opening try in the 17th minute, through stand-off Horne. The move came following a disrupted Leinster scrum, with Bennett and Pyrgos involved before left winger Tommy Seymour offloaded in the tackle for Horne to score, which Pyrgos then converted. Gopperth then missed a straightforward penalty for the visitors and soon after dropped a simple pass. From the scrum, in the 25th minute, Glasgow sparkled before Gray was heaved over from short range with Pyrgos unable to convert. Six minutes later the third Glasgow try was dotted down, by Strauss who broke a tackle 30 metres out and ran in for Pyrgos to convert. Madigan got Leinster on the board with a penalty in the 33rd minute but the half ended with Strauss held up on the visitors’ line and Pyrgos unable to convert the subsequent penalty. Despite coming close from the restart Glasgow could not get the bonus-point try and Leinster’s first attack of the second half, in the 51st minute, ended with Gopperth kicking a penalty. Glasgow dominated the first half and their sparkling handling was rewarded with tries from Peter Horne, Jonny Gray and Josh Strauss, with Henry Pyrgos converting two. They came very close to getting a bonus-point try but it proved elusive as Leinster gradually came into game. Jimmy Gopperth added a penalty to one in the first half from Ian Maddigan for the visitors. Then in a two-minute period Leinster scored tries through Jack McGrath and Tom Denton. With Gopperth converting both, Leinster led 20-19 with four minutes left, but Glasgow’s blushes were spared by a penalty from replacement Stuart Hogg well after the 80 minutes had registered. Glasgow’s backline was disrupted with the loss through injury of both Horne and centre Alex Dunbar, with Hogg and Sean Lamont coming on. As the 70th minute approached Leinster established themselves around the home 22 and in a two-minute period scored two tries to take the lead. First, the pack got over from a line-out with McGrath credited. Then another pack replacement Denton got hold of the ball at a line-out and dived over. Gopperth converted both scores. Glasgow responded by going to the Leinster line where immense pressure was finished off by a penalty kicked by Hogg to win the game. last_img read more

Read More »

Boxers Battle for N1m in GOtv Boxing Night 14

first_imgThe Indoor Sports Hall of the National Stadium, Lagos, will today, come alive as GOtv Boxing Night 14 holds. The event, which will feature seven bouts, will see the best boxer go home with a cash prize of N1million in addition to his fight purse.Nigeria’s Waidi Usman will take on Kenya’s Michael Nywade for the African Boxing Union (ABU) title in the headline bout. Fresh-faced Rilwan Babatunde will confront Djossou Agoy Basile of the Republic of Benin for the West African Boxing Union (WABU) welterweight title, while Rilwan Oladosu will attempt to win the national lightweight title when he goes up against Kehinde Badmus.Also, in the lightweight category, ABU champion, Oto Joseph will take on Prince Nwoye.In the light heavyweight category, Sulaimon Adeosun will trade punches with Majesty Maduka.Abiodun Afini is lined up to test his mettle against Razak Ramon in the cruiserweight division, while Chukwuebuka Ezewudo will engage Semiu Olapade.The event will be aired live on SuperSport in 47 African countries.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Read More »

“Evolution Stories Are Subtle and Complex” – Truth or Euphemism?

first_imgA worm brain has photoreceptors similar to those in humans.  What does it mean?  Elizabeth Pennisi in Science1 sets the stage, commenting on work by Arendt et al. in the same issue,2 “Ciliary Photoreceptors with a Vertebrate-Type Opsin in an Invertebrate Brain.”  One might think this demonstrates common ancestry, but Pennisi explains that it’s not a simple evolutionary story:Despite incredible variation in size and shape, eyes come in just two basic models.  The vertebrates’ photoreceptor cells, typified by rods and cones, are quite distinctive from the invertebrates’.  And although both use light-sensing pigments called opsins, the opsins are quite different in their amino acid makeup.    For years biologists have argued about how these varied components came to be.  Some insist that eyes evolved only once, despite this modern difference.  Others have argued that optical structures evolved at least once in invertebrates and again in vertebrates.    New data showing unexpected similarities between photoreceptors of a marine worm and humans add a new twist to this debate.  Detlev Arendt and Joachim Wittbrodt, developmental biologists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, and their colleagues have found that in addition to its regular opsin pigment, the worm contains another one almost identical to the human’s.  Their finding suggests that even the earliest animals had the makings of both vertebrate and invertebrate visual systems, and that some of the photoreceptor cells in the invertebrate brain were transformed over a series of steps into vertebrate eyes.  Although some researchers are skeptical, others think the data are sound….The research team thinks this “sheds new light on vertebrate eye evolution,” but the problem is that it pushes the origin of sight, a complex interaction of multiple functional parts, even farther back in time.  Another problem is that the human-like opsin in the worm has been conserved (unevolved) for 500 million years, according to the standard evolutionary time scale:Arendt and Wittbrodt jumped into the fray over eye evolution after Arendt noticed some odd cells in the brains of ragworms, a relic marine annelid species that’s been relatively unchanged for the past 500 million years.  “We were surprised,” Arendt recalls, as these cells looked very much like rods and cones.Further molecular and genetic studies showed that “Not only the morphology [outward appearance] but also the molecular biology of the two types of receptors was already set in our common ancestor”, according to a French biologist.  To put this new discovery into an evolutionary context, Arendt et al. had to invent a hypothetical ancestor even further back in time from the hypothetical ancestor of vertebrates and invertebrates, dubbed Urbilateria: They go further to suggest that the two types likely arose in a predecessor of Urbilateria.  In that organism, they speculate, the gene for one opsin and the genes to build the one type of photoreceptor cell were duplicated.  The extra set of genes might have evolved into a different visual system: “We think both photoreceptor cells track back to one cell type,” [Joachim] Wittbrodt [one of the authors of the paper] says.As the authors put it in conclusion, “The vertebrate eye thus represents a composite structure, combining distinct types of light-sensitive cells with independent evolutionary histories”.  So although this proposal seems to favor those who argue for the single origin of eyes, it illustrates that “evolution stories are subtle and complex.”1Elizabeth Pennisi, “Worm’s Light-Sensing Proteins Suggest Eye’s Single Origin,” Science, Vol 306, Issue 5697, 796-797, 29 October 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.306.5697.796a].2Arendt et al., “Ciliary Photoreceptors with a Vertebrate-Type Opsin in an Invertebrate Brain,” Science, Vol 306, Issue 5697, 869-871, 29 October 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.1099955].“A likely story” can have opposite meanings depending on the tone of voice.  Is the phrase, “subtle and complex” descriptive of a truth, or a euphemism for a dodge?  Suppose you were a teacher, and your student’s story about the origin of his term paper, which was clearly a hodgepodge of plagiarisms from several internet sources, he described as “subtle and complex.”  Suppose a politician described his flipflops over the years as being subtle and complex.  Suppose your husband’s disastrous room addition project was defended with a story he said was subtle and complex.  One thing is clear about this evolutionary story, as admitted by Pennisi: it is not simple and straightforward.  The PBS Evolution series tried to claim in 2001 that the eye followed a simple and straightforward progression from simple to complex, using the visual power of suggestion that a series of pictures of animal eyes in a progression from apparently simple to complex suggested an ancestral relationship.  Evolutionists love the word “suggest”.  Scattered similarities between distant organisms, all thriving in their own environments, all using highly-complex functional systems only “suggest” an evolutionary story when you have put yourself under Charlie’s spell and have opened yourself up to the power of suggestion.  Snap out of it.    Read this evolutionary story with the wide-awake understanding that opsins are very complex proteins (see 10/01/2004 headline and Michael Behe’s Darwin’s Black Box, pp. 15-25).  But their complexity alone is useless without even more complex organs and neurons that can interpret their responses.  Evolutionists want to hypnotize us into the suggestion that stories relating worms to humans by common ancestry are scientific.  Be a clear-headed judge of the evidence.  When missing links have to be invented out of thin air, and when complex functions have to be presumed to have “arisen” [a miracle word] earlier than previously believed, the burden of proof is on the storyteller that the statement, “evolution stories are subtle and complex,” is not just pulling wool over the eyes. (Visited 14 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Read More »

TEACHERS 2 LAST

first_imgOfficial sources said that a committee formed under theOfficial sources said that a committee formed under the chairmanship of former UGC chairman Prof Arun Nigvekar had been constituted by the HRD ministry last year to evaluate the API regarding the entry point and career advancement of teachers and these changes were made based on its recommendations.”The UGC has approved the proposed changes in the API mechanism and they will come into effect in a day or two when the notification is issued,” officials said.Last week, while speaking in a debate on the functioning of her ministry in the Rajya Sabha, HRD minister Smriti Irani had indicated that her ministry would soon change the API score criteria.”A teachers promotion needs to depend on the promotion of his class, that is, when a teacher totally dedicates himself only to the education of the student, does not get involved in extracurricular activity that teacher, in no way, should be penalized,” Irani had said in her speech. PTI ADS RGlast_img read more

Read More »

Euronav Offloads Its Oldest VLCC

first_imgzoomIllustration. Euronav’s VLCC Hakata. Image Courtesy: Euronav Belgium-based shipping company Euronav has disposed of VK Eddie, a 2005-built very large crude carrier (VLCC).As informed, the 305,261 dwt vessel was sold by Euronav’s subsidiary Euronav Luxembourg to an unnamed supplier and operator of offshore floating platforms.A capital gain on the sale is approximately USD 14.4 million, according to the company.The 330,572 cbm vessel has been delivered to its new owner and will be converted into an FPSO, therefore leaving the worldwide trading fleet.Euronav said that VK Eddie has become the ninth vessel the company has introduced into an offshore project over the past decade.With the newest transaction that is part of the company’s fleet rejuvenation program, Euronav sold its oldest VLCC. In January this year, the company also sold its Suezmax vessel Felicity that will be converted into an FPSO.Following the sale, Euronav has a fleet of 42 VLCCs, 2 ULCCs, 25 Suezmaxes and 2 FSO vessels.last_img read more

Read More »