26th Kabaka Coronation: Sheraton, UAP Old Mutual to reward top Golfers

first_img(L-R) Mr. Ronald Kawaddwa, the CEO of Buganda’s Majestic Brands, Ms Phiona Naiga Gahire, Marketing and Communications specialist at UAP Old Mutual, Sheraton’s Business Unit Manager, Mr Ssekitoleko David , Owk. Patrick Mugumbule, the Buganda Kingdom Lukiiko Speaker and Buganda Golf Association captain Sam Mubiru pose for a photo moment after the launch of this year’s edition of Kabaka Coronation Golf Tournament, one of the activities to mark the 26th Coronation anniversary of Kabaka Ronald Muwenda Mutebi II.KAMPALA – Buganda Golf Association and the Kingdom’s leadership announced the roster of sponsors for The Kabaka Coronation Golf Tournament, one of the activities to mark the 26th Coronation anniversary of Kabaka Ronald Muwenda Mutebi II.The tournament to be held at Kitante Golf Course on July 20 was launched on Wednesday at Sheraton Kampala presided over by Owk. Patrick Mugumbule, the Buganda Kingdom Lukiiko Speaker.Buganda Golf Association captain Sam Mubiru, who is also head of the organising committee, said; “The Stable-ford format tournament once again joins the mainstream celebrations of the events and the proceedings will be given to the cause of fighting sickle cell disease.”The Katikiro of the Buganda Kingdom, Charles Peter Mayiga will tee off the event at 8am.The tourney will have over 200 players forming corporate teams of four.Third-time associate sponsor Sheraton Kampala Hotel and returning associate sponsors UAP Old Mutual and Crown Beverages join the kingdom’s Majestic Brands to award the winners and also serve a huge cake in celebration.According to Sheraton’s Business Unit Manager, Mr Ssekitoleko David, the golf tournament is an opportunity to be used to sensitize the public about sickle cell disease in the country, an initiative that Kabaka Ronald Muwenda Mutebi II has spearheaded in the recent past.The disease is a group of genetic disorders that affect the red blood cells making them unable to efficiently carry oxygen around the body cells.“As Sheraton Kampala Hotel, we are passionate about sport and we continue to use events like sport to create awareness about issues that affect Ugandans.” Noted Mr. SsekitolekoMs Phiona Naiga Gahire, Marketing and Communications specialist at UAP Old Mutual revealed: “Continuing our partnership with the Kabaka Coronation Golf Tournament made perfect sense. We enjoyed a very successful first year and we’re delighted to be returning again.”“We are committed to associate with Buganda Kingdom and fellow sponsors and commit to join any cause that ensures good health for Ugandans,” she added.The Kabaka will celebrate his 26th coronation on 31st July 2019 at the Nkumba University main campus in Entebbe.Comments Tags: Buganda Golf Associationcharles peter mayigaCrown BeveragesKabaka Coronation Golf TournamentKabaka Ronald Muwenda Mutebi IIOwk. Patrick MugumbulePhiona Naiga GahireSam MubiruSheraton Kampala HotelSsekitoleko DavidtopUAP Old Mutuallast_img read more

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Done right, urbanisation can boost living standards in Africa

first_imgAfrica is urbanising later and at a lower income level than other developing regions, which means policy makers can learn from the successes and failures of other countries. Done right, urbanisation could significantly raise both productivity and living standards across the continent. An aerial view of Lagos, the most populous city in Nigeria, the second fastest growing city in Africa – after Bamako in Mali – and the seventh fastest growing in the world. In 2014 Lagos was reported to have a metropolitan population of 21-million, making it the largest metropolitan area in Africa. (Image: Wikimedia Commons)Patricia Jones, University of OxfordSub-Saharan African countries are urbanising fast. Currently, 335-million people are living in urban areas across the continent and this number is expected to double in the next 25 years.But as African cities have grown so have their problems. They are more congested than they were a decade ago, commuting times have increased and there is growing evidence that air pollution is on the rise.Most African governments have found it difficult to expand public services and infrastructure fast enough to keep up with their growing populations. This has led to an expansion of informal settlements. According to UN Habitat, more than 60% of all residents in African cities now live in slums.But the news is not all bad. Most of Africa’s urbanisation is yet to come so there is still time to get things right. Africa is urbanising later and at a lower level of income than other developing regions (see graph below) which means that African policy makers can learn from the successes and failures of other countries. Done right, urbanisation has the potential to significantly raise both productivity and living standards across Africa.Figure 1: Urbanisation and developing regionsSource: Author’s calculation based on World Development Indicators (2012)Cities are engines of growthUrbanisation is central to the growth process. As countries develop, workers move from rural to urban areas in search of higher paying and more productive jobs. Similarly, entrepreneurs choose to locate their firms in cities where localised economies increase their productivity. This is why cities are viewed as engines of growth.Historical data support this view. Since the industrial revolution, cities have become centres for industrial production and, as cities grow, so have the countries where they are located. The robust relationship between levels of urbanisation and per capita income can be seen in data mapping trends of economic growth against urbanisation. (See graph below).Figure 2: Urbanisation and economic developmentSource: Author’s calculation based on World Development Indicators (2012)Economic growth happens when workers shift out of low-productivity activities such as agriculture and into high-productivity activities, such as manufacturing and some service activities. Urbanisation generates growth in two primary ways: urban jobs tend to be more productive than rural jobs and productivity changes are larger in urban areas than in rural areas.In poor countries, where the majority of workers are employed in agriculture, economic growth is driven primarily by rural to urban migration. For rich countries, economic growth is primarily driven by higher productivity changes in urban areas compared with rural areas.Cities are engines of growth for a range of other reasons too. It is cheaper to provide infrastructure when populations are large and people are densely packed together.Spatial proximity also makes it easier for individuals to learn from each other. There is increasing evidence that knowledge spillovers play a key role in raising the productivity of successful cities. In the United States, for example, a 10% rise in the percentage of workers with a college degree in cities leads to a 22% rise in per capita metropolitan product.What’s missing in African cities?Historically, the best way for a country to grow is by expanding its manufacturing sector (see graph below). Early industrialisation usually takes place in cities so industrialisation and urbanisation go hand in hand.The problem is that Africa is urbanising without industrialising. Few African cities are expanding their manufacturing sectors – at least not at the same rate as cities in other regions. This is a cause for concern because manufacturing jobs usually pay higher wages than those in agriculture and trade.Figure 3: Manufacturing and economic developmentSource: Author’s calculation based on World Development Indicators (2012).Across Africa, average wages are highest among miners and manufacturing workers. But the mining sector is capital-intensive which means that it employs fewer workers compared to other sectors. Therefore the best way to raise incomes is by increasing the number of manufacturing jobs.Where Africa’s cities are falling shortSuccessful cities serve two functions: they provide liveable environments for workers and their families, and they provide productive environments for businesses.The typical African city is achieving neither. Most African cities score low on every metric of livability such as housing quality, access to public services, and security of tenure.African cities also fall short in terms of productivity. Often firms are unable to take full advantage of being based in cities because of inappropriate regulations and massive under-investment in public infrastructure.On top of that, high urban costs make it difficult for African firms to compete on global markets.These constraints can be eased through better policies, particularly in relation to land access and business regulations.The way forwardGetting the most out of Africa’s rapid urbanisation won’t be easy. There needs to be a focus on proper co-ordination and effective planning.The biggest challenge is to understand how public policies can be used to optimise investments by households and firms. The development of a city is about three investment processes which build assets on land: investment in residential property, in commercial property and in infrastructure.The productivity of these three forms of investment is mutually inter-dependent. These interdependencies give rise to benefits that accrue to parties other than those making the investment (positive externality), which, to be optimised, require coordination through effective planning.Developing countries need to learn how to manage their urbanisation process. The key to success is not simply ensuring that the positive benefits outweigh the negative — it is about creating liveable and productive environments that promote sustained growth.Patricia Jones is Project Manager/Researcher (Urbanisation in Developing Countries) at University of Oxford.This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.last_img read more

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Australian Open: History beckons as Serena Williams shoots for Slam history

first_imgMOST READ The 37-year-old enters the tournament ranked 16 in the world but has proved in the past that such numbers mean little to her, despite fresh memories of her meltdown in losing the US Open final to Naomi Osaka in September.Her 2017 triumph Down Under gave Williams the outright open era record for singles majors ahead of Steffi Graf’s 22, leaving only Court’s tally of 24 titles — 13 of which were earned in the amateur era before 1968 — for Williams to chase.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsWilliams missed her first chance to match Court when losing last year’s Wimbledon final to Angelique Kerber, and said ahead of the Australian Open that she was taking nothing for granted.“It’s something that I clearly want but I have to be able to get there and beat a lot of good players to get it,” the American said. TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening Regarding the controversial final against Osaka at Flushing Meadows — when she raged against umpire Carlos Ramos who imposed three code violations, the final one resulting in the loss of a game — Williams said she had put it put behind her and intended to “move on to bigger and better things”.Bookmakers in Australia have installed Williams as a short-priced favourite for the title with her US Open conqueror Osaka — the first Japanese player to win a Grand Slam — next in the betting.Osaka shinesThe 21-year-old Osaka backed up her US Open win by riding a wave of fanatical home support to reach the final of the Pan-Pacific Open in Tokyo without dropping a set.She warmed up for Melbourne by making the semi-finals of the Brisbane International last week, where she blamed a poor attitude for losing to Lesia Tsurenko.ADVERTISEMENT But the 20-year-old Aryna Sabalenka from Belarus has zoomed up the rankings from 73rd at the start of 2018 to number 11 on the back of tournament wins in New Haven and Wuhan, and is a dark horse to emulate Osaka and achieve a maiden Grand Slam.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “I feel like last year I did a lot of that,” she said. “I’m trying to change it more, and I think I have.”While she is the leading light for the next generation, the world number four’s status as second favourite points to a lack of serious rivals for Williams among the more established players.Wozniacki, ranked three, started last season by winning her first Grand Slam in Melbourne and returning to world number one, but ended it in October with the bombshell announcement that she had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis.The 28-year-old Dane insists she can manage the debilitating auto-immune condition, which sometimes leaves her so exhausted she cannot raise her arms above her head.Wozniacki proved she can still compete by winning in Beijing in October but whether she can cope with the gruelling two-week slog of a Grand Slam remains to be seen, and she was bundled out of the Auckland Classic last week in round two.Halep cloudWorld number one Simona Halep of Romania comes into the tournament under a fitness cloud after a nagging back injury curtailed her 2018 season.Second-ranked Angelique Kerber has already indicated her priority for 2019 will be the French Open, the only Slam to elude the 30-year-old German in her career.Maria Sharapova has failed to impress since returning from a doping ban and, now ranked 30, is looking some way from the player who won five Grand Slams.Two-time major champion and former number one Garbine Muguruza was another who had an injury-blighted 2018 which saw her drop out of the top 10. SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Serena Williams of the US plays the ball to Venus Williams of the US, during the 2018 Mubadala World Tennis Championship match in Abu Dhabi, on December 27, 2018. (Photo by GIUSEPPE CACACE / AFP)Serena Williams is back in Melbourne as hot favorite to repeat her 2017 Australian Open win and claim a record-equalling 24th Grand Slam with rivals, including defending champion Caroline Wozniacki, battling health issues and poor form.Williams won her 23rd title and seventh at Melbourne Park while eight weeks pregnant two years ago, and now attempts to match Margaret Court’s mark of 24 singles majors on the Australian’s home soil.ADVERTISEMENT PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Philippine Azkals flaunt quality under continental spotlight Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion LATEST STORIES View comments Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? Private companies step in to help SEA Games hostinglast_img read more

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