Who is CJ Stander: Ten things you should know about the Ireland No 8

first_img Who is CJ Stander: Ten things you should know about the Ireland No 8Ireland back-row CJ Stander has become an integral part of the national squad since making his debut in 2016. There’s a lot more to find out about the Munster No 8 too…Ten things you should know about CJ Stander1. Christiaan Johan Stander was born on 5 April 1990 in George, South Africa. He plays for Ireland after qualifying on the three-year residency rule in November 2015.2. Stander was a champion discuss thrower in his teenage years where he lived, in South Africa’s Western Cape.3. He stands at 6ft 1in (185cm) tall and weighs 18st (114kg).4. He represented South Africa in the U20 Rugby World Cup in 2009 and 2010, finishing third in the tournament in both years.5. Stander wasn’t considered big enough to play for the Springboks unless he converted to hooker. Stander said of the situation: “I was told I was too small (to play loose forward) and that I should move to hooker as that was the only position where I would play international rugby.“I said to myself, ‘I’m not going to do this’. I just made the decision easy and said, ‘Well boys, I’ll pack up my stuff and leave’.”6. Stander moved to Munster in 2012 and made his 150th appearance for the province against Leinster in January 2021. Can’t get to the shops? Download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet. Subscribe to the print edition to get magazine delivery to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Facts and figures about the South Africa-born Munster back-rowercenter_img 7. Stander’s wife is Jean-Marie Neethling, the sister of Olympic gold medal-winning swimmer Ryk Neethling, and the couple have a daughter called Everli, who was born in 2019.Stander’s brother, Janneman, is also a rugby union player for South African team SWD Eagles.8. He made his Ireland debut against Wales in the 2016 Six Nations. At the end of that 2015-16 season, he won the Rugby Players Ireland Players’ Player of the Year and Supporters’ Player of the Year awards.9. Stander was named Limerick’s inaugural Honorary International Ambassador in 2017 by Mayor Kieran O’Hanlon.10. Stander was part of the 2017 British & Irish Lions squad for their tour of New Zealand. He played in seven games during the tour, including an appearance off the bench in the decisive third Test against the All Blacks. That match ended in a 15-15 draw, meaning the series was also drawn. CJ Stander qualified for Ireland on residency (Getty Images) last_img read more

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West Texas: San Marcos church rekindles passion for God’s creation

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Environment & Climate Change Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH West Texas: San Marcos church rekindles passion for God’s creation AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel center_img Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET By Mike PattersonPosted Jul 9, 2014 Submit a Job Listing Environmental Stewardship Committee co-chairs Ann Walsh, left, and Margo Case stand in the labyrinth at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in San Marcos, Texas.[Diocese of West Texas’ Church News] St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in San Marcos, Diocese of West Texas, sits at the base of a gentle embankment dappled in a profusion of bluebonnets and dotted by shady live oak trees. The sanctuary is lined with soaring windows as though nature itself is invited to join the services while a sprawling labyrinth seemingly emerges organically from a hillside to engage seekers on their spiritual quests.“You get a sense of creation when you’re here,” said St. Mark’s rector, the Rev. Benjamin H. Nelson III.“Here” is on the eastern edge of the rolling Texas Hill Country, along an elongated geological escarpment known as the Balcones Fault and atop the environmentally sensitive Edward’s Aquifer recharge zone. And “here,” at St. Mark’s, its Environmental Stewardship Committee is engaged to raise congregational and community awareness, appreciation and preservation of the natural treasure that encompasses their surroundings.“That’s part of the reason why this group is so active. We’re reminded of nature every Sunday,” Nelson said. “There are gardens all around us, wildlife, birds, flora and fauna all over the place. It’s a cool worship space for us.”The committee, now with about a dozen members, formed a decade ago, primarily to explore the interweaving of the natural environment with the mission of the Episcopal Church. One of the original members, Larry Hanson, continues to be an active member.Initially, its work focused on recycling but that emphasis has mushroomed into a myriad of activities, ranging from crafting homemade Christmas gifts to encourage reusing and recycling, to the regularly scheduled sale of environmentally friendly coffee. The group also developed an Advent meditation booklet consisting of meditations and prayers based on daily scripture readings that connect nature to God and creation written by members of the committee“The meditations are pretty successful,” Nelson said. “We print up a couple of hundred and they all disappear. It gives the committee a chance to talk about the environment and brings in people who may not normally come in contact with this.”And proceeds from the periodic sale of coffee – fair traded, locally roasted, organically and shade grown – are split between the Episcopal Relief & Development fund and local environmental causes.Organized in 1874, St. Mark’s moved to its 25-acre campus in 2010 and into a sanctuary that, as Nelson describes, is “wide open to creation.” A portion of the credit for the design and placement of the building goes to the efforts of Sarah Carlisle, Florence Dodington and Susan Hanson, master naturalists and gardeners on the committee, and an array of other volunteers who researched and provided recommendations for sustainable construction, design, landscaping and even its physical placement and alignment to the sun.St. Mark’s Episcopal Church is lined with soaring windows that envelop the sanctuary in nature.Before moving into the new church, the committee also organized a mulching and watering campaign to preserve the sprawling liveoak trees when Texas was struck by a severe drought, said Ann Walsh, co-chair of the committee. Many members of the congregation joined in with the committee to tackle this challenge.“In the two years I’ve been here they’ve not only incorporated projects that are really cool and innovative but they also focus on formation of people,” with the idea that “this creation we live in is a gift from God and it is up to us to partner with God to take care of it,” Nelson said.“Not just that you should recycle but you should recycle because it is part of our care for God’s creation and this wonderful gift we are entrusted with as partners in ministry,” he said. “I think it’s a real gentle way to include that in the life of the parish.”The committee keeps the idea of environmental stewardship in front of the congregation through various publicity activities. For example, environmental stewardship is mentioned in nearly every church newsletter, and the group even created a website dedicated to environmental stewardship at the church, http://stmarksenvironmentalstewardship.weebly.com.“We feel like we keep having activities to keep people thinking about it,’ said co-chair Margo Case. “We try to educate people about why we’re sponsoring a particular event. We’re very careful not to politicize any of this because it’s not a political cause. It’s a taking care of creation cause.”Nelson has encouraged their efforts by instituting periodic Rogation services. The services are designed to “make us aware of God in creation and to get them connected to an old tradition of the church. It’s so Episcopalian and Anglican.”For Nelson, environmental stewardship “kind of gets back to our roots. We’ve always been a people who were deeply connected to creation. All of our great stories in scripture – the emergence of our self through this idea that we were created in the image and likeness of God and God created this world and it was very good. That’s who we are, so scripturally it’s rekindling and retelling that story in a way that connects to wherever we are in our life.”Nelson was selected as rector of St. Mark’s in 2012. By coincidence, his doctoral thesis happened to concern the environment – “the spiritually of water, combined with some Hawaiian traditional values and the language of the Prayer Book and how encounters with creation can enhance, inform and shape our life in Christ.”“I think that when the rancher, the tree hugger, the oilman, the developer, when they sit down and talk about their spiritual values, you can sometimes get through the differences to a place where they can start talking about caring for the earth,” he said. “Their goals may not be the same but the values can be, and that can be a language of commonality, especially if they are faithful people.”To encourage other churches to undertake environmental stewardship, the committee hosted the Diocese Ecological Stewardship booth at the 2014 Diocesan Council in San Marcos. “We were trying to connect with people at other churches,” Walsh said. “To see if we could get some people who were interested and maybe we could help mentor other churches in starting up their own committees.”When she talked to visitors at their booth, Walsh asked if they had people who worked on the grounds of their church. If they did, “I said you have environmental stewardship but you haven’t thought of calling it that. We’re trying to get people to see themselves as environmental stewards.”“Anytime they start the mower, they are doing environmental stewardship,” she said. “Anytime they plant a plant, anytime they make a decision about what kind of light bulb to put in the sanctuary, that’s environmental stewardship.”Case and Walsh each had their own reasons for getting involved in environmental stewardship.“One of the biggest steps for me is trying to get people to see the connection between taking care of the environmental, God and our spiritual world,” Case said. “It satisfies my need for a practical application of my faith.”Walsh’s involvement grew out of a desire to find a way and an interest to become more involved in the life of the church. “It was something I could connect with. I love being outside, I’m an avid birder and gardener. For me, it was a perfect fit.”And for Nelson, environmental stewardship has rekindled the gift of God in him so that he doesn’t “take things for granted in creation.”The next horizon for the committee is to involve younger children and families in caring for the environment. Walsh would like to see the natural playground, now in the planning stages, to “include some space where you can gather families together and get them actively participating in environmental stewardship activities.”Case and Walsh invite other churches interested in embarking on their own environmental stewardship work to contact them for help as mentors. “We could tell them here’s what we’ve been doing and this is how we got started,” Walsh said. “Getting people to more actively organize themselves is something I would wish to see.”— Mike Patterson is a San Antonio-based freelance writer and member of St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church in Blanco, Texas. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC last_img read more

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Indigenous activist Berta Cáceres assassinated in Honduras

first_imgWorkers World received this release on March 3 from the School of the Americas Watch (soaw.org) At approximately 11:45 p.m. last night (March 2), the general coordinator of COPINH [Consejo Cívico de Organizaciones Populares e Indígenas de Honduras], Berta Cáceres, was assassinated in her hometown of La Esperanza, Intibuca. At least two individuals broke down the door of the house where Berta was staying for the evening in the Residencial La Líbano, shot and killed her. COPINH is urgently responding to this tragic situation.Berta Cáceres is one of the leading Indigenous activists in Honduras. She spent her life fighting in defense of Indigenous rights, particularly to land and natural resources.Cáceres, a Lenca woman, grew up during the violence that swept through Central America in the 1980s. Her mother, a midwife and social activist, took in and cared for refugees from El Salvador, teaching her young children the value of standing up for disenfranchised people.Cáceres grew up to become a student activist and, in 1993, she co-founded the National Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) to address the growing threats posed to Lenca communities by illegal logging, to fight for their territorial rights and to improve their livelihoods.Berta Cáceres and COPINH have been accompanying various land struggles throughout western Honduras. In the last few weeks, violence and repression towards Berta Cáceres, COPINH and the communities they support, had escalated. In Río Blanco on Feb. 20, Berta Cáceres, COPINH, and the community of Río Blanco faced threats and repression as they carried out a peaceful action to protect the River Gualcarque against the construction of a hydroelectric dam by the internationally financed Honduran company DESA.As a result of COPINH’s work supporting the Río Blanco struggle, Berta Cáceres had received countless threats against her life and was granted precautionary measures by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. On Feb. 25, another Lenca community supported by COPINH in Guise, Intibuca, was violently evicted and destroyed.Since the 2009 military coup, which was carried out by graduates of the U.S. Army School of the Americas, Honduras has witnessed an explosive growth in environmentally destructive megaprojects that would displace Indigenous communities. Almost 30 percent of the country’s land was earmarked for mining concessions, creating a demand for cheap energy to power future mining operations. To meet this need, the government approved hundreds of dam projects around the country, privatizing rivers and land and uprooting communities.Repression of social movements and targeted assassinations are rampant. Honduras has the world’s highest murder rate. Honduran human rights organizations report there have been over 10,000 human rights violations by state security forces and impunity is the norm — most murders go unpunished. The Associated Press has repeatedly exposed ties between the Honduran police and death squads, while U.S. military training and aid for the Honduran security forces continues.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Case Round up

first_imgOur resident experts at Pinsent Curtis Biddle bring you a comprehensiveupdate on all the latest decisions that could affect your organisation, andadvice on what to do about themBarlow v Borough of Broxbourne, High Court: High Court rejectsdamages claim for depression caused by alleged bullying and stress Barlow claimed damages for psychological injury, which he claimed had beencaused by victimisation and bullying at work, which had led to him suffering adepressive illness. He also claimed damages for stress. The High Court rejectedboth claims. The High Court ruled that the incidents relied on were not sufficient, whenconsidered individually or cumulatively, to amount to bullying orvictimisation. Furthermore, the council was not liable for the depressiveillness caused by Barlow. There was nothing in Barlow’s behaviour that hadindicated any risk of psychiatric illness. He had failed to establish thatthere was a reasonably foreseeable risk that the conduct complained of would causehim harm. Key pointsThe High Court took a robust view to the allegations of bullying. There wasevidence of Barlow’s manager being angry with him, and using very abusivelanguage. While the High Court considered it undesirable that senior managers shouldresort to abusive language in the workplace, the incidents had be regarded incontext, were not numerous and were due to the manager being exasperated at thecatalogue of errors in the department for which Barlow was responsible. Barlowwas a senior employee and did not appear to be particularly sensitive or upsetby the incidents. The case also reinforces the fact that in claims for psychiatric illness,whether due to alleged bullying or for stress, the key issue is whether or notthere is a foreseeable risk of ill health. This is the first ‘threshold’ issueto be considered. If foreseeability of harm to health is not established, theclaim must fail. What you should do – Although this claim was unsuccessful, remember bullying and stress cangive rise to other types of liability, such as constructive dismissal anddiscrimination claims. They can also cause low morale, increased staff turnoverand absenteeism – Implement policies on bullying and harassment. Make it clear that bullyingis a serious disciplinary offence and advise employees on the procedure forraising complaints – If complaints are raised, take them seriously – failure to do so can alsoamount to constructive dismissal and possibly discrimination – Train managers in appropriate methods of dealing with poor performance andother managerial issues, including the proper use of disciplinary, performancereview and other procedures Albion Automotive v Walker and Others, Court of Appeal: Animportant decision on when enhanced redundancy payments become part of thecontract In six previous redundancy exercises before Walker’s redundancy dismissal,Albion had made enhanced redundancy payments. When Walker was dismissed, hereceived only a statutory redundancy payment. An employment tribunal ruled thatthe enhanced redundancy terms were part of Walker’s contract of employment byvirtue of custom and practice. That decision was upheld by the EAT and by theCourt of Appeal. Key pointsThe decisive issues, in the Court of Appeal’s view, were that the enhancedredundancy terms had been applied in previous redundancy situations; had beenput in writing by Albion and shown to the employees; were well known to allemployees; had been applied over a considerable time period to approximately750 employees; and that all of the Albion employees had a reasonableexpectation that they would also receive the enhanced redundancy terms. It was also particularly relevant that the company had applied the termsautomatically in later redundancy exercises without further negotiation orreference to the trade unions, and that statements made by the company in anewsletter in 1993 – that “the redundancy terms which will apply to theseredundancies are those which are currently in operation” – indicated thatthe company intended to be contractually bound by the enhanced redundancy termspolicy. Enhanced redundancy payments are common, particularly in large-scaleredundancy exercises. They often provide an incentive to employees to volunteerfor redundancy and, in the case of compulsory redundancy, can reduce theincidence of unfair dismissal claims or the value of any claims that arebrought. This case, however, demonstrates that the regular use of the sameenhanced terms creates a substantial risk of the employer being bound to offerthese terms in subsequent redundancy exercises. What you should do To avoid enhanced redundancy payments acquiring contractual effect: – Manage employees’ expectations by making clear that the terms apply to aspecific redundancy exercise or for a specific period, that there is nocommitment to use these terms in any future redundancy exercise and that theemployer has no intention of being contractually bound – Don’t reduce the terms to writing or make them widely available to employees– Make a specific decision in each redundancy exercise on the terms thatwill apply. Make sure this is documented and shows there is no commitment tomaking these terms available in the future – Consider applying different terms to different redundancy exercises Hunter Cane Limited v Watkins, Chancery Division: Divertingbusiness opportunities was breach of director’s fiduciary duties In October 2002, Watkins resigned from his employment as a director of thecompany. When the company examined the computer he returned, it suspected hehad taken clients and business with him, in breach of his fiduciary duties as adirector. The court ruled that Watkins’ resignation was prompted by his desire toacquire for himself actual or potential business opportunities from thecompany, and that during his employment he had secretly and systematicallyabused his position as a director. There was clear evidence that he had soughtto divert the company’s business to himself. The company obtained an injunctionrestraining him from dealing commercially with 21 named clients. Key pointsIn this case, Watkins had no service agreement with the company. However, asa director, he was under fiduciary duties and had breached these by seeking todivert, for his own benefit, business that ought to have gone to the company.Crucial to the granting of the order was compelling evidence that showedWatkins had diverted these business opportunities to himself. What you should do – Use written service agreements and include appropriate protection againstpost-termination competition by employees. The employer here was able to relyon a breach of fiduciary duty – that argument is only available in the case ofdirectors and can be difficult to establish. A written contract is the bestapproach – Take legal advice on the appropriate form of the post-terminationcovenants. To be enforceable, these should be tailored to the businessinterests that the company can legitimately protect and the risk posed by theemployee after termination – Include covenants preventing dealings with customers or clients aftertermination, as well as prohibitions on soliciting or canvassing for business – Include a garden leave clause as this may provide additional (and moreeasily enforceable) protection against the employee damaging the company’sinterests at termination.WATCH THIS SPACE… – The application of TUPE to outsourcing (particularly contractorchangeovers) remains controversial due to the very different approaches adoptedby the ECJ and the Court of Appeal. The CA’s most recent decision – RCOSupport Services v Unison – will be heard by the House of Lords later thisyear. The decision will be of great significance, being the first time that theHouse of Lords has considered this issue. – In May, the EAT will consider the challenge to the upper age limit on theright to claim unfair dismissal and redundancy payments. The Government ischallenging an earlier employment tribunal ruling in Rutherford v Harvest TownCircle that the upper age limit amounted to indirect sex discrimination,because it had a disparate impact upon men. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Case Round upOn 1 Mar 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Aqueous and Mungion Rage NYC With Post-Phish Throwdown [Gallery/Videos]

first_imgLoad remaining images Here’s a video of Aqueous covering “Fame” by David Bowie in the deep hours of the night:Check out the gallery below, courtesy of Jeremy Scott Photography. Last night after the Phish show let out of Madison Square Garden, fans headed over to DROM for some late-night action. Aqueous and Mungion made up the incredible double-bill, blasting fans with pure rock and roll to the umpteenth degree. The first of many after-parties packed the room with high energy, taking in deep breaths of excitement and letting out sighs of gratitude for both up-and-coming bands.Mungion kicked the late-night off properly, blending elements of Rock, Jazz, Latin, Metal, Bluegrass, Jam, Electronic, Classical, World Music, and Funk, to create a sound that is truly their own. Afterwards came Aqueous, who muscled their innate ability for both composition and improvisation by balancing their impressive songwriting with their natural tendencies to jam. Craig Brodhead from Turkuaz even joined in for their original tune “Origami”.Here’s a clip of Mungion closing out their incredible set, before Aqueous took the stage:last_img read more

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