Thousands to sit NGSA today, tomorrow

first_imgThousands of students across the length and breadth of Guyana will sit the first of the two-day National Grade Six Assessment (NGSA) examinations today.Education Minister Nicolette Henry will this morning visit three public schools in Georgetown; namely Rama Krishna Primary School, North Georgetown Primary School and St Margaret’s Primary School. The NGSA is a placement examination offered at the end of the primary education cycle to determine which secondary school students will be allotted.Some students writing mock exams last year in preparation for today’s National Grade Six AssessmentAccording to the Ministry, the overall performance is calculated by adding five per cent of each candidate’s Grade Two scores in Mathematics and English, and 10 per cent of the Grade Four score in the same subjects. This was then added to a further 85 per cent of each candidate’s score in those subjects at the Grade Six Assessment. The combined scores in Mathematics and English were then added to the scores gained in Science and Social Studies.On April 12 and 13, 2017, about 13,657 students from across Guyana wrote the National Grade Six Assessment. During the two-day examination period, the students were assessed in four subject areas: English Language, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies – two on each day. Each subject consists of two papers – Paper Two was the first paper written and consisted of essay-type questions while Paper One consisted of multiple choice questions.However, prior to this, the students had to write the National Grades Two and Four Assessments back in 2012 and 2014 respectively. A percentage of the marks from all three assessments will be calculated to determine the overall performance of each student.After the examinations conclude tomorrow, students for the next few months will be anticipating where they will be placed when the results are released by the Education Ministry.Over the past three years, the trend of Maths performance was 37.49 per cent pass rate in 2015, 13.85 in 2016 and 45.6 per cent in 2017. Last year, the students were tested in this subject based on their knowledge, algorithmic thinking and reasoning. In 2015, English recorded 45.88 per cent, 41.62 per cent the following year and in 2017, 54.1 per cent pass rate of students gaining more than 50 per cent. “This is the first time in many years that we were able to get over 50 per cent passes in a subject area and that is absolutely phenomenal,” Minister Henry had stated. The figures for Science were 44.12 in 2015, 27.55 in 2016 and 46.3 per cent this year. In this subject, they were tested for knowledge, comprehension and application. There was a 46.5 per cent pass rate recorded in 2015 for Social Studies, 46.1 per cent in 2016 and 47.6 per cent in 2017.last_img read more

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Militant group claims bombing responsibility

first_imgNEW DELHI – A little-known group that police say has ties to Kashmir’s most feared militants claimed responsibility Sunday for a series of terrorist bombings that killed 59 people in New Delhi. Authorities said they already had gathered useful clues about the near-simultaneous blasts Saturday night that ripped through a bus and two markets crowded ahead of the Hindu festival of Diwali, one of the year’s busiest shopping seasons. Investigators reportedly raided dozens of small hotels across India’s capital looking for possible suspects, and police said “numerous” people were being questioned. The attacks came at a particularly sensitive time as India and Pakistan were hashing out an unprecedented agreement to partially open the heavily militarized frontier that divides the disputed territory of Kashmir to speed relief to victims of a massive earthquake earlier this month. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week The agreement was finalized early Sunday, and Indian officials appeared hesitant to quickly put the blame for the bombings on Pakistan-based militants, unlike in previous terror attacks during a 16-year-old insurgency by Islamic separatists in India’s part of Kashmir. India’s accusations of Pakistani involvement in a 2001 attack on parliament put the two nuclear-armed rivals on the brink of a fourth war. But they pulled back and, after pursuing peace efforts since early last year, both appeared intent on keeping the atmosphere calm. “We have lots of information but it is not proper to disclose it yet,” Indian Home Minister Shivraj Patil told clamoring journalists after an emergency meeting of the Cabinet called to discuss the attacks. “Our people are making good progress. The investigation is going well.” A man called a local news agency in Indian Kashmir to say the militant Islamic Inquilab Mahaz, or Front for Islamic Uprising, staged the bombings, which police said killed 59 people and wounded 210. The caller, who identified himself as Ahmed Yaar Ghaznavi, said the bombings were “meant as a rebuff to the claims of Indian security groups” that militants had been wiped out by security crackdowns and the Oct. 8 earthquake that devastated the insurgents’ heartland in the mountains of Kashmir. A senior police officer in India’s Jammu-Kashmir state said the caller’s name was not familiar to intelligence agencies, and New Delhi’s deputy police chief, Karnail Singh, said the group had not been very active since 1996. However, while Singh refused to comment on the claim of responsibility, he said the group is linked to the Pakistan-based Lashkar-e-Tayyaba, the most feared of the dozens of Kashmiri militant groups. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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