Immigrants try hand at salon work

first_imgSANTA CLARITA – Mama Rose, Sharon Given and Nancy Nguyen are family, but they do not celebrate the holidays together. Their bond is not one of blood, but it is not just commerce, either. “When you get out of your country and have lost your family, you keep the love and caring for them,” manicurist Nancy Nguyen said. “Instead of sitting and moaning, depressed, you give that love to your clients – as family – as you take care of them the best you can.” Her clients’ loyalty bears this out. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals Sharon Givens – an eight-year devotee whose name Nguyen shortened to make it easier to pronounce – has followed the manicurist to three shops. What used to be a short walk has evolved into a half-hour drive. Mama Rose drove from her lodgings in Thousand Oaks – after traveling from Arizona three days before Thanksgiving – so Nguyen would have time to “cook” her. The cooking process involves a pre-manicure soak so warm you feel you could be listed on the menu between the lobster and prime rib. Clients adore Nguyen in spite of the ritual. “She scalds your hands and feet till you scream,” Givens said. She ran her fingers through a bed of purple glass pebbles lining a bowl as her cuticles softened. “I think I’ve sent her 30 of my friends,” Givens said. “She knows my whole family.” Vietnamese immigrants work in or own a number of nail salons across the Santa Clarita Valley. Many of them have tried their hands at other businesses and careers before settling on this one. Patrons may have no idea the soft hand holding theirs once gripped the hull of a boat headed to an unknown shore. Givens commended Nguyen and fellow manicurist Billy Bui for engaging her in conversation about travels and family and not shutting her out with talk-fests in Vietnamese as they work in their rent spaces at The Nail Garden in Newhall. Mama Rose’s next-door neighbor is 89. She is not a client, but Nguyen cradles her hand anyway. When Nguyen takes her 15-year-old son, Tan, a ninth-grader at Hart High School, to a nearby Spanish tutor, Nguyen visits the older woman, who is “like my grandmother.” “I sit next to her, hold her hand, watch TV while I’m waiting for my son,” she said. Nguyen’s grandmother died in 1998. Tan greets all of his mother’s customers when he stops by, Givens said. “He was only 7 when I met him,” she said. “We’ve all watched him grow up.” On Sundays, Tan learns to read and write Vietnamese at a school in the San Fernando Valley. The boy spoke like a native during a family trip to Vietnam, made before his great-grandmother died. “Nobody knew he was born in the U.S.,” Nguyen said proudly. There is a flip side to perpetuating Tan’s link to his cultural inheritance. It is cultivating gratitude for his American roots, Nguyen said. “I take him there so he can see how lucky he was to be born in the U.S.,” she said. Vietnamese children must work to help support their families, she said. Nguyen’s sister still lives in Vietnam. The women send e-mails and talk every couple of weeks. Nguyen shares the caramel-like candies – dense with banana, peanuts, sesame and ginger – that her sister sends. She was 17 in 1978 when she immigrated to the United States with her uncle and cousin. Her uncle’s friend in Visalia sponsored them. Nguyen stayed on with the family friend to finish high school when her uncle moved to Los Angeles a few years later. Nguyen recalled a favorite teacher at Redwood High School – Mr. Chen – but blanked on his first name. “Laurence!” Mama Rose chimed in from Bui’s station. She lived there once upon a time. After high school, Nguyen studied nursing, juggling English and medical lingo in her brain. She worked as a nurse’s aide at a hospital. Then she married her husband of 16 years, working alongside him in business. “Her husband got her into nails,” Givens said. Nguyen’s husband volunteered her services as a translator to a family friend who ran a nail salon. One thing led to another. Nguyen learned the trade and sank roots in Santa Clarita in 1998. She feels she was divinely guided to this line of work. “There’s a purpose for me here,” she said. “I have no idea why God sits me here to do this.” It may be her answer to an earlier prayer: make sure you send me to be with people because I can’t work with a computer. “Maybe this is why God wants me to be here, to listen, to comfort them in things,” she said. While Nguyen has embraced all things American, she tells customers her Thanksgiving turkey “ran away.” All the way to Las Vegas. And she has to catch up with him. The soft-spoken Bui came to the United States in 1981 when he was 25. He had escaped Communist rule in Vietnam by climbing aboard a fishing boat in the darkness in 1979. The former student huddled side-by-side with nine people for four days, scrambling for a place to sleep. “We had to hide from a guard at the border,” he said of the escape. “If they catch you they put you in jail or they might shoot you if you don’t stop.” The boat captain was his friend. The refugees landed in Hong Kong, where Bui stayed for 5 months. Then he came to California, staying with a friend from Hong Kong who lived in the San Fernando Valley. Six people jammed into two rooms. Bui dragged his mattress into the living room. He stayed in the place for about a year while learning the sheet-metal trade. As he talked, Bui finished off a client’s pedicure, dabbing stray marks of bright red polish with remover. Bui followed a year-and-a-half working sheet metal with 13 years in the ink cartridge business. Then he switched gears, training to become a manicurist. “I had fun. I enjoyed it,” Bui said. Customers were friendly and they helped him master English. He sometimes paints his tiny human canvasses with flowers, favoring airbrush designs. Bui spoke of the Vietnamese tradition of seeking perfection in their handcrafts, suggesting it could be one reason so many immigrants flock to the hands-on nail care business. Many of Bui’s family members still live in Vietnam. Two brothers have settled in Seattle and another lives in Oklahoma City. Bui returned to Vietnam three years ago to attend his father’s funeral. “I believe most of the people who live in Vietnam dream about coming to America,” he said. “I appreciate the American government, especially the people who gave open arms when we came.” Bui, who lives in the San Fernando Valley, said he wishes he could afford to live in Santa Clarita. He is married and has two sons, 18 and 25. Both of them have learned Vietnamese. Bui speaks a smorgasbord of tongues: some French, Spanish and Chinese, and English and Vietnamese. He soaks up culture by visiting the Vietnamese community in Santa Ana, he said. And celebrates Thanksgiving with a potluck. Across town in Saugus, Tan Tran owns Accent Nail and Spa. Like Bui, he fled Vietnam in 1979. He and his brother spent five days aboard a boat headed for Thailand, where they knew no one. The brothers lived in a Thai refugee camp for almost three months before they were sent to the Philippines. They spent eight months waiting for “processing” for the final destination: America. “They tried to teach you English,” he said. “They stopped by every morning. That’s how we learned … how to buy a ticket, food.” Tan settled in Atlanta and worked as a dishwasher and in the sheet-metal trade. He moved to Texas about nine months later in search of his fortune, working on a fishing boat. “After two months I found out there was no way,” he said. He took off for San Francisco, where he worked in a restaurant and as an electronics technician. He bought a furniture store, but it was not meant to be. He made two more forays into the electronics field before finding his pot of gold. In the late 1980s, his wife, Kim, began to learn manicuring. In 1990 they opened their Saugus salon. Now she takes care of the customers while he runs the business. They live in Santa Clarita with their three kids, who are 17, 12 and 3. The kids have learned their parents’ native tongue. Tran last visited Vietnam in 1995 and hopes to go again next year. The couple’s hard work has paid off. Six weeks ago they opened a second nail salon in Valencia. Tran reflected on the 15-year climb. “When I stepped out of my country, I was looking forward to freedom,” he said. “We try day by day and learn day by day, trying to become the best person in this country. “If you can do it, you do it,” he said. Judy O’Rourke, (661) 257-5255 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. 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South African swims in Italy for local charity

first_imgCarina Bruwer of the pop group Sterling EQ recently raised R20 000 for a local charity that aims to help children with cancer. The organisation needs R600 000 to help feed 60 families in December and give the children Christmas gifts.In an attempt to make the holiday season bearable for critically ill children in South Africa, Carina Bruwer of instrumental pop group Sterling EQ recently raised R20 000 for a local charity during a visit to Italy.This fundraising is part of Swim For Hope. The initiative is run by Bruwer in collaboration with Little Fighters Cancer Trust. Little Fighters is an organisation that supports children with cancer and their families.Bruwer, a veteran marathon swimmer, started Swim For Hope in 2013 with a solo swim around Cape Point. She has done numerous swims for Little Fighters since then, and has raised over R300 000 over the past few years. For her swim in Italy on 11 October, Bruwer collected R20 000 for the project’s Christmas Elves Project.THE RACE IN ITALYBruwer took part in the annual SwimTheIsland race in Bergeggi, in Italy. This is one of Europe’s largest open water events, with over 2 000 swimmers competing in distances ranging from 800m to 6km.The musician and swimmer was invited as an international celebrity to endorse the race for the second year, according to the organisers. She aimed to complete 18km by swimming multiple laps of the race route, to raise funds for the Little Fighters Cancer Trust, they said.The crowd was delighted when she finished the 18km and then announced that she would swim another lap to raise additional funds. Despite multiple jellyfish stings, Bruwer completed a 21km swim in a time of 6h25’58.Sterling EQ’s two other members, Ariella Caira and Luca Hart, supported Carina from the beach. The Sama award-winning trio performed at the opening of the event on Saturday night on the piazza in Spotorno, to a capacity audience consisting of participants, supporters and members of the public.Bruwer and Sterling EQ are based in Cape Town.Carina Bruwer with Sterling EQ’s other two other members, Ariella Caira and Luca Hart, supported performed at the opening of the event on Saturday night on the piazza in Spotorno.Little Fighters Cancer Trust tweeted their gratitude:A MASSIVE THANK YOU to Carina Bruwer for braving the oceans for our #LittleFighters, over and over. The funds… https://t.co/LkaDurwb4S— LittleFightersTrust (@LFCancerTrust) October 20, 2015Yes, she is indeed a Fighter, refusing to give up in her efforts to raise funds and awareness for children… https://t.co/1UQFeHpQzs— LittleFightersTrust (@LFCancerTrust) October 20, 2015Bruwer also took to social media to speak about her achievement:Despite multiple jellyfish stings, Carina Bruwer completed a 21km swim instead of the 18km she was asked to do.CHRISTMAS ELVES PROJECTSwim For Hope aims to provide a Christmas gift to every patient in the paediatric oncology wards at 15 hospitals all over South Africa. There are approximately 2 000 children with cancer. Besides the Christmas gift, each child will also get a snack pack, a Santa hat and a cracker.Another goal is to give Christmas gifts to the siblings of the child who has cancer. The organisation also aims to make sure that 60 families get a full month’s groceries for December.HELP NEEDEDSwim For Hope needs R600 000 to make sure this project reaches its target. Anyone who would like to help is asked for:Toys for the children – to keep the presents fair, any donated toys should not cost more than R200 each;Snack packs – consisting of a packet of Lays crisps, a small boxed fruit juice, a packet of Maynards soft chewy sweets, a lollipop and a fizzer, packaged in a ziplock or zipseal bag;Christmas hats and Christmas crackers; Non-perishable food, cleaning materials and toiletries;or Money – for fresh produce such as meat, fruit, vegetables, dairy, eggs and milk to be bought for 60 families.last_img read more

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“The Amazon Way on IoT” – John Rossman discusses his latest book

first_imgJohn Rossman is a managing director with the global technology consulting firm Alvarez and Marsal and a prior executive with Amazon. An influential digital strategist with over 25 years in technology. He spoke ReadWrite about his latest book  “The Amazon Way on IoT: 10 Principles for Every Leader from the World’s leading Internet of Things strategies.”During the interview, John provided insights on IoT and reasons why corporations need to understand this emerging technology. He also shared examples of how the technology is currently being used and how it might be used in the future. ReadWrite: I think your book offers a unique angle on IoT. It looks a little bit different than other IoT books on the market. It seems like more of a high-level book, but at the same time, you’re applying the principles that you’ve utilized at Amazon and also some of the principles you had written about previously. Can you describe the impetus for the book?John Rossman: The impetus for the book was a number of different factors. I had the opportunity to do a few client engagements where we were helping to frame and understand what the opportunity was for IoT in their business. What I found was, there was a lot being written in very segmented use case ways of IoT and how it was impacting and really big predictions about the number of sensors, etc, and there’s a lot written in the technical space. But there was nothing that really helped you answer the question ”How should IoT impact my business and how do I go about evaluating the potential for IoT in my business?’ I thought ‘There’s a customer segment that needs to be served, because that’s an essential question that every business leader needs to be asking themselves.”  Then as I started to frame out ‘How should a business leader think about IoT in their business? What are the different models? Every model, every principle, every strategy, one of the best use cases was always — What was Amazon doing in that space?’ And then I looked at ‘What can I write about and think about authentically?’ So those three, factors came together for me and that’s why the book is for business leaders who really need to evaluate ‘What should my IoT plan be?’ I told the story through the lens of Amazon and other great companies to demonstrate the different strategies that IoT can have for a business and leave the user for a set of questions to ask themselves on each strategy. Is this potentially a strategy for me or not?RW: Can you describe IoT? I really don’t think the general public or companies really understand how IoT is going to impact their immediate future.JR: I think of IoT in kind of three layers. On one layer, IoT is a set of technical capabilities. It’s sensors, it’s connectivity, it’s cloud computing, it’s analytics and algorithms. All of those things being stitched together. On the next layer, IoT is kind of the use cases and scenarios that it can enable in terms of whether it’s a connected health scenario or list avoidance or any of the great IoT use cases that we hear. At the top level, IoT is really a core business strategy enabler. And that’s where I think leaders need to really start in their thinking. Understanding how can IoT impact my customer’s experiences. How can IoT drive the next wave of operation excellence within my organization and how can IoT help me build new business models and new service models in innovative ways. IoT is really all three of those things. On one layer it is a set of technologies and as you said, it’s many different technologies kind of integrated together for any one scenario.RW: Years ago, Bill Gates, in his book “The Road Ahead,” he predicted IoT. He talked about handheld devices communicating with the environment. He also said that there was a division between eras. There was a division between the PC era and the Information Highway. Now, we’re on the cusp of the next era with IoT. Do you think the general public is prepared for this?   JR: I think it depends on what level of impact. I think the public is ready for some of the maybe simpler scenarios and for the good things that can happen out of this and whether that’s like some of the scenarios that Amazon’s doing, like partnering with DHL and Audi so you can have a package delivered to your car from DHL. The public is ready for that. But I think, some of the under the waterline issues around the automation that this is going to open up and some of the privacy matters that are only going to be heightened and some of the security things that are going to happen. Good things come along with the potential for dramatic change and it’s going to be disruptive. I like the word ‘disruptive,’ because it kind of describes that it’s not all going to be fun along the way, and it’s going to cause challenges for individual and cause challenges for employment and it’s going to cause societal challenges, but we’re up to solving those things, but it doesn’t mean that it’s going to be easy along the way. Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Follow the Puck Tags:#Amazon#Internet of Things#IoT#John Rossman Related Posts Clarke Illmatical RW: In the first chapter of your book, you referred to IoT as ‘’A tsunami of opportunity and a threat.’’ Why is it a potential threat?  JR: For two reasons, one is because of some of those under the waterline implications and challenges that we just talked about and also existing business models are going to be dramatically changed and that’s a threat to the establishment and traditional businesses. As much impact as digital models have had to date, I think that IoT is going to be the next wave of digital model and the impact and the speed of that oncoming wave is going to come even faster than the first digital wave has come at us.RW: Let’s talk ethics. We’re already heavily connected. Now we’re in an era with smartphones and glasses that learn about us. Potentially, a decade from now, IoT will try and connect as much as possible. A person like yourself who has seen technology evolve, what ethical concerns do you have regarding IoT?JR: I would say it’s not my area of expertise… I think that’s a big topic in security and privacy go along with that… As in most things with ethics there’s healthy debate on both sides of every topic. I think you really have to target that on a scenario by scenario topic. But the comment that I would have, when it comes to security or privacy, as it comes to legal matters. Those topics are not checkpoints that you do like ‘Hey I’m ready for launch of my IoT capabilities now, I’ll do my legal review or now I’ll do my privacy review!’ You really need to involve those and those are really core requirements that need to be designed from the very beginning of your strategy and your scenarios that you’re going to develop. Those are big and important topics and they need to be considered from the very beginning.RW: In the first chapter, you mentioned that you were creating a roadmap to help leaders understand this technology. Within the next five years, in terms of transportation, health or entertainment, what kind of changes will IoT bring about? What kind of changes will we see thanks to IoT? JR: I think that you’ll see on the transportation front, where kind of managed situations where automation has a dramatic impact and is a really viable solution. Transportation and commercial transportation in shipping and container yards, I think the opportunity for IOT both in terms of transportation that provides the overall monitoring and management is pretty great.RW: In your book, you provided examples of how IoT is being implemented currently. Are there any case studies or recent examples that you’ve seen of IoT in use that impressed you or you thought was a very good sign of how the technology should be used? JR: Some of the examples or use cases that I think are some of the most compelling is around worker safety and worker’s compensation insurance management. The nice thing is what everybody’s aligned when it comes to creating safer work environments. There are some really neat scenarios where workers are equipped with sensors to help measure the stress and strain that they’re putting onto their bodies to help avoid and measure workloads so that they can avoid worker’s compensation claims and that benefits everybody and when there are accidents or incidents that happened, the ability to have a better picture of what happened and better analytics so that those can be managed better, so that frauds avoided, so that subjugation is better managed is a real interesting scenario. I really like those scenarios involving worker safety and helping to operate in a more assured environment.RW: In terms of when enterprise companies were introduced to the internet in the mid-90s, what’s the biggest mistake that companies made then, that they can’t afford to do right now with IoT? JR: When the first e-commerce models were coming along, a lot of very smart people were very dismissive to the impact that that would have over time. I think retail is maybe the easiest one to look at. Today, e-commerce and digital capabilities is a significant piece of the overall retail environment, and it’s where almost all of the growth is. Too many companies dismissed it and sat on the sidelines and so my advice to companies even if now isn’t the time to go big in IOT or to change a business model based on IoT, you need to at least be paying attention and getting really smart on what are your competitors doing, what are similar industries doing, where are investments going on IoT in your industry and I would encourage you to start building some organizational capacities. Some smarts and abilities to execute on these models, because when it becomes late in the games, it’s going to be really hard to build those experiences and that organizational capacity. I think the mistake to avoid is to think that it won’t impact you and to do nothing.RW: In closing, who really need your book immediately? Who benefits from reading this book right away?JR: Anybody who’s in an organization who is in a position to be answering the question ‘What is our IoT strategy?’ Sometimes that’s in the business, sometimes that’s in the technology organization, sometimes it’s in the product and field organization. It can be in a lot of places, but anybody who’s asking that question ‘What’s our IoT strategy?’ I think should read the book. Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You…last_img read more

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Eya Laure warns UST against complacency ahead of Game 2

first_imgSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—University of Santo Tomas is one win away from breaking a nearly decade-long curse, but rookie star Eya Laure reminded her teammates not to be too confident.The Golden Tigresses took Game 1 in commanding fashion over a shell-shocked Ateneo, 25-17, 25-16, 25-20, Saturday at Smart Araneta Coliseum but Laure gave a reminder that the UAAP Season 81 women’s volleyball tournament is not yet over.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anewcenter_img UST last won the title in 2010 when the school still had the likes of Rhea Dimaculangan, Angge Tabaquero, and Aiza Maizo-Pontillas and from that time until Season 81, the Golden Tigresses made the Final Four just three times.Laure may have said that she and her teammates shouldn’t be complacent, but she expressed her confidence in the program head coach Kung Fu Reyes set out for them.“We just have to have the right mindset,” said Laure. “We trust in coach Kung Fu’s program and everything he’s given to us in training is what molded us as players.”ADVERTISEMENT Breadwinner Cherry Rondina buys home for family in Cebu “I told Ate Sisi (Cherry Rondina) during the huddle after our win that we shouldn’t be complacent because there’s still one more game left to play,” said Laure in Filipino.“The fight isn’t over because there are still so many things that could happen on Wednesday [for Game 2].”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsLaure won the league’s Rookie of the Year and first Best Outside Hitter plums after she finished with a total of 230 points and average of 16.4 points a game during the eliminations, but she was quiet for much of Game 1.Laure, however, didn’t have to do much with Rondina waxing hot with 23 points. Still, the young star came away with 11 points. Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess MOST READ Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST PLAY LIST 01:00Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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India in South Africa: Why does this cameraman come to work dressed in a suit?

first_imgOn a day where India and South Africa battled hard on the pitch at Newlands, one man caught the eye of the spectators and viewers alike, and he wasn’t even playing.Dressed in a three-piece suit and tie, cameraman Oscar stole the show on the first two days of first Test between India and South Africa in Cape Town.ALSO WATCH: SPORTS TODAYAs Hardik Pandya struck 14 boundaries and a six en route to his valiant 93 , Oscar tracked each and every of his strokes. When the Indian all-rounder returned with the ball in hand, Oscar was again ready to shoot India’s fight back.But why was he wearing a suit? many wondered, every time he was on screen much to the amusement of the fans at Newlands.Back home as the cold-wave grips the country, it made sense to be covered on the field. Although that is not the reason for his fashionable show.In a video posted by the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) titled “Cameraman Oscar – The story behind his suit”, he revealed “the secret behind his smart attire”.  Cameraman Oscar – The story behind his suit – by @28anandDressed in a formal suit, cameraman Oscar�??s presence during a Test match in South Africa is hard to miss. But what is the secret behind his smart attire? Watch the full video on https://t.co/CPALMGgLOj pic.twitter.com/GlRFUjpYCs- BCCI (@BCCI) January 7, 2018Zotani Oscar is a TV cameraman for a leading South African TV channel and if you are wondering why he is dressed like this, he says ” in the season of 2007-08, when New Zealand was here (in South Africa). It happened that one of out cameraman’s got sick, while I was still working in the studio.advertisement”Then my former technical director, asked me to help out, with the other guy having to leave. Then I went wearing a suit and a tie. And from thereon he said he wanted to see me wearing that in every Test match. So it started like that. I only do it on the first day, when there is no chance of me to pull rigs, to pull cameras,” he said.   He added that he is more comfortable wearing a suit rather than leave his skin bare to the elements, something he says the crowds really enjoy.”I actually fell more comfortable wearing a suit rather than having to expose my skin to the sun. People started by laughing at me, but now it actually excites them. I usually get good complements from my fellow commentators, Pommie Mbangwa and Kepler Wessels,” he said.  Oscar also revealed that the suit he was wearing was bought from Kolkata.”Actually this suit I got it from Kolkata from a tailor, whose name I am forgetting. He was recommended by Pommie (Mbangwa),” he said.  As the action returns to the pitch on day three, Virat Kohli’s India face a stiff challenge to claw their way back into the Test, Oscar signed off, “This is Test match cricket, and I like it in a suit, because it is for the love of the game.”last_img read more

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Elder outraged over caribou slaughter

first_imgAPTN National NewsChiefs from northern Manitoba are calling for an investigation into the slaughter of 30 barren ground caribou.They want more conservation officers to patrol winter roads to prevent similar incidents from happening again.The grisly discovery was made by Northlands Dene First Nation Chief Joe Dantouze.last_img

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Rep Kelly invites local residents to listen to monthly radio segment

first_img State. Rep Tim Kelly, R-Saginaw Township, invites local residents to tune in to his monthly radio broadcast the first Sunday of every month on “Issues and Answers”, a public affairs program that airs on the Saginaw radio stations of Cumulus Broadcasting.Kelly will use his 15-minute monthly segment on the show to invite a special guest for an insightful conversation regarding local and state government issues and more.Kelly’s segment airs on the first Sunday of every month at the following times:5 a.m. on 93.3 WKQZ5 a.m. on 104.5 WILZ5:30 a.m. on 102.5 WIOG6 a.m. on 96.1 WHNN“It’s important to focus on open communication and ensure that the local community is aware of upcoming issues,” Kelly said. “I look forward to covering a broad spectrum of topics and working closely with these radio stations to better inform Saginaw area residents on matters facing Michigan families today.”“Issues and Answers” is a weekly program hosted by Hal Maas the remainder of the month.Kelly and his staff can be reached toll free at 855-94KELLY (855-945-3559), via email at [email protected] and by mail at P.O. Box 30014, Lansing, MI 48909.#### 04Feb Rep. Kelly invites local residents to listen to monthly radio segment Categories: Kelly Newslast_img read more

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