Does travel upset your stomach? Maybe it is changes in your gut microbiota.

first_imgSlide from webinar. Dr. Hannah HolcherWritten by Kristen DiFilippo MS, RDN, LDN, Doctoral CandidateI paid way too much in a cute Italian café to eat Greek yogurt for breakfast.  I would do it again without hesitating.  After 4 days away from home for a conference, I needed “normal” food.  Maybe I should back up.  I love new food and flavors.  I love new places, and I most especially love to eat new food in new places.  My stomach does not always appreciate my adventures, and always ends up feeling a little off when I travel.  After an informal poll (full disclosure: I just talked to some friends and family), I find I am not alone.  I also found varying theories for the upset tummies that come with travel.  One says it’s the change in water.  Another suggested the extended sitting that comes with long distance trips.  I think it might have something to do with the changes in food intake.  Even as an adventurous eater, when I am at home, my diet maintains a relatively predictable pattern.  That pattern includes Greek yogurt for breakfast.  With fruit.  And granola.  It’s my go to.  Not that I don’t enjoy a good crepe, omelet, or waffle, but these tend to be more for special occasions or dinner.  Weekday breakfasts are a quick meal for me.  So I turn to yogurt to satisfy my needs for fast, flavorful, filling breakfasts.  I hadn’t had my yogurt for 4 days.  All my meals have been in restaurants or in the conference hotel.  My stomach finally told my brain that enough was enough.  So I paid what it would typically cost for 2 weeks of my yogurt-granola-fruit combo at home.  It was glorious.  So was the latte, but that’s another story.My adventures (and misadventures) with travel food made me think about our upcoming webinar on the Gut-Microbiome-Brain Axis.  Hannah Holscher, Ph.D., RD an assistant professor of Food Science and Human Nutrition at the University of Illinois, will be talking about the connections between the bacteria that live in our gut and signals to our brain, along with the role diet plays in supporting those bacteria to maintain optimal physical and mental health.   One of the studies she will talk about showed that diet can change our resident bacteria rapidly (David et al., 2014).  The study fed participants diets of entirely plant or entirely animal products for 5 days.  Obviously, my diet changes were not this extreme, but I can’t help but wonder if this is my answer to why travel upsets my stomach.   When my diet changes, maybe my microbiome changes too. While this is purely speculative, it makes sense that when I cut out a meal containing both probiotic bacteria and the prebiotics that support those bacteria, my microbiome would change.  Regardless, I am excited to learn more about the microbiome, how I can influence it with diet, and the impacts on mental and physical health.   But first, I need to figure out the fun new place I am going to go for dinner.Does your stomach get upset when you travel?  What are your tips to avoid this from happening?Tune into this times webinar and learn more about gut microbiota, July 27, 2917, 11:00 am ET.  Register at the event page.This blog was posted by Robin Allen, a member of the Military Families Learning Network (MFLN) Nutrition and Wellness team that aims to support the development of professionals working with military families.  Find out more about the MFLN Nutrition and Wellness concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, and LinkedIn.last_img read more

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WTA Finals: Sloane Stephens beats Naomi Osaka, Kiki Bertens stuns Kerber

first_imgSloane Stephens and Kiki Bertens started their campaigns at the WTA Finals with victories on Monday.Stephens battled past Naomi Osaka 7-5 4-6 6-1 while Bertens stunned Wimbledon champion Angelique Kerber 1-6 6-3 6-4 in the opening matches of the Red Group.Bertens of the Netherlands was the last player to make it into the eight-woman tournament when world number one Simona Halep withdrew through injury.Earlier, a calm Stephens picked her shots to perfection to pull clear for a victory over Japan’s Naomi Osaka in a battle between the last two US Open champions.Stephens and Osaka are making their debuts at the season-ending event, and it was the American who opened Red Group action with a win built on the foundations of solid defence from the baseline and a devastating forehand when she attacked.”I just competed really well and never gave up,” Stephens said in a post-match interview. “I knew I would have to play some really good tennis to beat her, stayed tough and tried to stay as positive as I could and took my opportunities when they presented themselves.””I don’t really have any regrets”@Naomi_Osaka_ is already looking forward to her next @WTAFinalsSG match –> https://t.co/Y5H25ZMevX pic.twitter.com/eqQv3FIVCGWTA (@WTA) October 22, 2018After trading early breaks, the match settled down as the pair enjoyed more success on serve, until Stephens, content to adopt a patient approach from the baseline, broke again in the seventh game when Osaka made a slew of unforced errors.advertisementBut Osaka is not one to back down and the 21-year-old Japanese broke straight back to level the contest at 4-4, thanks to some sublime stroke-making aided by a couple of double-faults from her opponent.After a solid hold from Stephens, Osaka was struggling to contain her emotions as she found the net or went long with her increasingly erratic backhand and the American secured her third break of the match to move a game away from taking the set.TACTICAL SWITCHStephens was growing in confidence as Osaka battled her emotional demons and the American fittingly sealed the opener on her third set point, when the world number four sent another backhand into the net.Osaka changed her tactics at the start of the second set, finding success by drawing Stephens into the court and away from her baseline comfort zone to hold far more comfortably, but the American used her potent forehand to stay in touch.”She’s a great player and playing with a lot of confidence so I knew I had to battle”@SloaneStephens explains the secret to her @WTAFinalsSG win over Naomi Osaka. pic.twitter.com/K4XAoSSEtZWTA (@WTA) October 22, 2018Stephens looked the more composed at that stage, but Osaka dug deep and battled back from 15-40 to hold in the fifth game and came out on top of three breaks of serve to send the contest into a decider when the American double-faulted on set point.The world number six broke immediately at the start of the third set and after Osaka wasted a chance to level things up when she declined to challenge a call that would have been ruled in her favour, Stephens took command of the match.A pair of easy holds and an another break took her to 5-1, and the 2017 U.S. Open winner sealed the contest on her second match point when an anguished Osaka double-faulted for the fourth time in the match.”We played a really tough and competitive match so its always an honour to share the court with somebody that good,” Stephens added.BERTENS’S COME-FROM-BEHIND VICTORYFor the first time in the round-robin format, all four lower seeds won their opening round matches, as Elina Svitolina, Karolina Pliskova and Sloane Stephens all recorded victories in the first matches of the tournament over the first two days.”I’m really happy to get the win here today,” Bertens said on-court after the match. “It was a slow start but I was really happy to turn around this match. I had a little chat with my coach when it wasn’t going so well, so we decided to go a little bit more for my shots, play a little more aggressive and it worked out.” Kiki Bertens of the Netherlands celebrates after beating Angelique Kerber 1-6 6-3 6-4 (AP Photo)The victory is Bertens’ tour-leading 11th over a Top 10 player this season, but she needed to do it the hard way after losing the opening set in just about 30 minutes.advertisementKerber continued to build momentum early in the second set, and ultimately held a 6-1, 2-0 lead in the match before Bertens secured her first break of serve to level proceedings at 2-2.Each woman broke serve six times in the match, and the Dutch World No.9 overcame 12 double faults on her own delivery in the match to secure two key holds in the final [email protected] completes the comeback victory at the @WTAFinalsSG!Gets the win over Kerber 1-6, 6-3, 6-4! pic.twitter.com/qRomp8D8A9WTA (@WTA) October 22, 2018Bertens’ dug out of a 0-40 hole to snap a string of seven straight breaks in the decider – capping the game with one of her five aces for the match – and later sealed the victory with a forehand winner – her 25th finisher in the match overall.(With inputs from Reuters and WTA)last_img read more

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15 days agoChelsea keeper Kepa insists no Real Madrid regrets

first_imgChelsea keeper Kepa insists no Real Madrid regretsby Carlos Volcano15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea goalkeeper Kepa Arrizabalaga insists he has no regrets missing a move to Real Madrid.Kepa was all set to leave Athletic Bilbao for Real in January 2018, only for Zinedine Zidane to block the switch.He recalled: “It was a few months in which my grandmother saw me more in the newspaper than in person. There was a lot of talk about me. Also because of an injury I was not going through good times.”I was finishing my contract and since January I could talk to teams. I didn’t get to see what happened. “I ended up renewing and with the idea of staying and after six months I left. It’s the only contradiction.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Whistler Film Festival Announces 2017 Winners

first_img Facebook Advertisement Twitter Login/Register With: Advertisement Evan Rachel Wood, star of the Canadian film A WORTHY COMPANION, was the recipient of this year’s Best Performance in a Borsos Competition Film Award. The jury noted that “Evan gives a brave, raw nuance performance that explores the grey areas between predator and victim”.The Borsos Award for Best Screenplay went to Grayson Moore, writer and co-director of CARDINALS, which presents a fresh take on the psychological drama that unfolds with the unpredictability of a great novel.Best Cinematography in a Borsos Film, presented by I.A.T.S.E. Local 669, went to cinematographer Sara Mishara for A WORTHY COMPANION, with an honourable mention to Nicolas Bolduc for HOCHELAGA, LAND OF SOULS. The jury wanted to acknowledge the work of a director of photography that managed to create a rich and detailed visual universe through a very subtle crafting of the light. The honourable mention is for a stunning composition from Nicolas Bolduc and a major visual achievement that the jury felt compelled to acknowledge.WFF’s Borsos Competition for Best Canadian Feature jury was made up of a diverse group of Canadian storytellers, all of who have had films at the festival. This year’s jury included Montreal born producer Sylvain Corbeil, whose credits include the award-winning films of Denis Côté and Xavier Dolan such as IT’S ONLY THE END OF THE WORLD and MOMMY, which both received the 2016 and 2014 Grand Jury Prize at Festival de Cannes, as well as FÉLIX AND MEIRA which dominated the WFF Borsos Competition in 2014; B.C. based actress and WFF Star to Watch Alumni Camille Sullivan, who attended Whistler in 2015 as the lead in THE BIRDWATCHER, as well as in 2014 with ALLY WAS SCREAMING and won the UBCP/ACTRA Award for both performances. She most recently starred alongside Peter Coyote and Aden Young in the hit television show, The Disappearance; and lastly celebrated Canadian director Charles Officer whose early feature NURSE.FIGHTER.BOY premiered at Whistler in 2008 and garnered 10 Genie nominations. His latest documentary UNARMED VERSES premiered to major acclaim at Hot Docs 2017 where it won Best Canadian Feature Documentary award and most recently won the Best Canadian Documentary award at Vancouver International Film Festival.The 20 feature films eligible for the Borsos Competition for Best Canadian Feature included:8 MINUTES AHEADA WORTHY COMPANIONALL YOU CAN EAT BUDDHABECOMING BURLESQUETHE CANNONCARDINALSTHE DEFINITESHOCHELAGA, LAND OF SOULSJUGGERNAUTMOBILE HOMESNEVER SAW IT COMINGNOBODY FAMOUSPORCUPINE LAKEPRODIGALSTHE PRODIGAL DADSANTA STOLE OUR DOG: A MERRY DOGGONE CHRISTMASSOMEONE ELSE’S WEDDINGTRENCH 11TULIPANI: LOVE, HONOUR AND A BICYCLEVENUSThe World Documentary Award is being presented to THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ANDRÉ directed by Kate Novack. The jury stated: “The winner of the world documentary award delivers a fascinating portrait of a larger-than-life personality, but admirably escapes the trappings of simple biography by revealing how a towering, influential figure still thrives in an imperfect world.”The jury also gave an honourable mention to Alan Zweig, director of THERE IS A HOUSE HERE, which is a film that explores the harsh realities of a fractured community and yet it discovers, in fact, that society can gather together and create a strong and supportive community for those in perpetual need.The World Documentary jury included Vic Sarin, one of Canada’s most celebrated filmmakers, earning recognition as one of Canada’s premier cinematographers. As a director, Sarin has won recognition for feature films such as PARTITION, A SHINE OF RAINBOWS and COLD COMFORT and documentaries SUCH AS; BOY FROM GEITA, HUE: A MATTER OF COLOUR, DESERT RIDERS and most recently KEEPERS OF THE MAGIC. Also on this year’s jury are two Americans Jill Friedberg, a Seattle-based documentary filmmaker who has produced and edited the award-winning documentaries, THIS IS WHAT DEMOCRACY LOOKS LIKE, SWEET CRUDE and UN POQUITO DE TANTA VERDAD; and Michael Dougherty, Head of Acquisitions at Radiant Films International in Los Angeles, who is also any associate programmer at AFI Fest and Head Programmer for the Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles.The Best Mountain Culture Film Award presented by Whistler Blackcomb went to DEPTH PERCEPTION directed by Chip Taylor and Chris Murphy. The jury stated that “DEPTH PERCEPTION was a clever and awesome representation of mountain culture, pure entertainment. It was able to tie in the full ‘story’ with a simple well thought out concept. Beautifully shot with exceptional snowboarding. The writing had the perfect balance of edge, accessibility, and meaning. It was able to transport the judges to a place of imagination just outside of realism but staying grounded in themes of the sport, environmentalism, and spiritualism.”The Mountain Culture jury included BC-based filmmakers and athletes, Jeff Thomas, Director of Video Production at Origin Design & Communications and a producer of multiple award-winning outdoor and adventure films, beloved Whistler local, comedy, writer, director, editor, and actor Kyle Killeen who is a three time finalist for the 72 hour Filmmaker Showdown, and Katie Burrell, a stand-up comedian and filmmaker with one filter – satire.The ShortWork Jury included director and WFF Alumni Grayson Moore(winner of WFF’s 2014 Best Canadian ShortWork Award for RUNNING SEASON and co-director of CARDINALS, receiving its Western Canadian Premiere at WFF 2017), Founder and Executive Director of First Weekend Club Anita Adams, and Jeremy Torrie, Director/Writer/Producer and President of High Definition Pictures Inc.The $1,000 Canadian ShortWork Award went to WE FORGOT TO BREAK UP, directed by Chandler Levack. The jury stated that “this cinematically stunning short film delivers at every turn. It’s beautifully written with wonderfully naturalistic dialogue, it’s poetic, stylish and superbly performed, most notably by our lead. Captivating from start to finish, this first time director is extremely deserving of this recognition.”The jury mentioned that there were so many wonderful films to review and it took the jury a long time to come to our final decision. As such, it would be remiss of us not to mention another very accomplished film. The jury has given an honourable mention to CYPHER by Lawrence Le Lam.The International ShortWork Award went to FEAR US WOMEN directed by David Darg. The jury stated: “Compelling from the opening minute, this honest and raw documentary is an unflinching look at the fearless women on the battle front in Syria. It’s a gritty and honest story with an amazing message – one that needs to be told.”The $500 ShortWork Student Award went to FLOATING LIGHT, directed by Natalie Murao. The jury stated: “The future of BC filmmaking is in very good hands. This was a very impressive lineup of student shorts, so to standout amongst this group is a major accomplishment. For its impressive performances, dreamy aesthetic, and for the assuredness and subtly in its directorial vision, the jury is pleased to give this award to a stunningly accomplished and inventive film that uses a quiet voice to speak loudly. This is a filmmaker with an extremely bright future.”The MPPIA Short Film Award, presented by MPPIA and Creative BC, was awarded to Veronika Kurz for 20 Minutes to Life. The award consists of a $15,000 cash award plus up to $100,000 in services. The completed project will have its world premiere screening at the 2018 Whistler Film Festival.  The 2017 MPPIA jury included Writer and Director Eisha Marjara (attending with VENUS, WFF’s 2015 Power Pitch winning project which received it’s Western Canadian Premiere at WFF 2017; Jameson Parker, Director of Development at Brightlight Pictures (Producer, Actor in PRODIGALS, which received its World Premiere at WFF 2017); and Producer, Peter Harvey (attending with THE CANNON which received its World Premiere and MOBILE HOMES, which received its Western Canadian Premiere at WFF 2017.The Alliance of Women Film Journalists presented this year’s EDA Award for Best Female-directed Feature to Eisha Marjara’s VENUS, a film that tells the tale of a woman in transition. The jury stated: “VENUS is both a touching drama about the hardship of transition and how it affects family, friendships, and relationships but it’s also a really lovely and reaffirming story of love and the strength of friends and family. And we enthusiastically applaud the brilliant performance from Debargo Sanyal, who moved us to new understanding. Brava Majara and Sanyal.”The Alliance of Women Film Journalists presented the EDA Award for Best Female-Directed Short Film to Sharren Lee’s THE THINGS YOU THINK I’M THINKING. The jury stated: “At its center is a person you don’t often get to see on the screen: Sean, a burn survivor and amputee who re-enters the world of dating. In a bar, he meets with Caleb, an able-bodied and appealing man who appears to take a romantic interest in him.  And while, despite having no hands, Sean has managed to master getting around with great agility and some panache, his next roadblock is himself and being able to overcome his fears, insecurities, and trust issues — something that’s probably familiar to all of us. Ultimately, at the heart of the film are two people looking to make a human connection. And we found that we connect with them, too.”The Alliance of Women Film Journalists presented a Special Jury EDA Award to Kyra Sedgwick for her directorial debut STORY OF A GIRL. The jury stated: “A well balanced, timely and beautifully crafted film about a teenage girl dealing with the fallout of modern-day bullying. Anchored by a wonderful lead performance from Ryann Shane and memorable turns from Kevin Bacon and Sosie. We take special pleasure and pride in presenting the EDA Award to Kyra because as a young actress she actually played the granddaughter of the Eda for whom the awards are named, activist actress Eda Reiss Merin, the mother of AWFJ president, Jennifer Merin. We look forward to seeing more from Kyra!”Eligible female-directed films are being screened for the EDA Awards as part of the festival’s regular program, and are being nominated for EDA Awards consideration by Whistler Film Festival’s administration and programmers. The Narrative feature jury included: Marina Antunes – Row Three, Vancouver, Nikki Baughan – Screen International, London, Betsy Boszdech – Commonsense Media, San Francisco, Jennifer Merin (Chair) – Cinema Citizen, New York, Gill Pringle – The Independent, Los Angeles; Short Film Jury included: Katherine Brodsky (Chair) – Variety, Vancouver, Lexi Feinberg – Big Picture, Big Sound, Berkeley, Karen Martin – Arkansas Online, Little Rock, Diana Saenger – East County Gazette, San Diego, Susan Wloszczyna – RogerEbert.com, Washington, DC.Variety’s Vice President and Executive Editor Steven Gaydos acknowledged the Variety 10 Screenwriters to Watch, five of whom were present: Variety’s class of 2017 screenwriters and notable credits include: Liz Hannah (“The Post”), Taylor Allen and Andrew Logan (“Chappaquiddick”), Hallie Meyers-Shyer (“Home Again”), Maggie Betts (“Novitiate”), Tracy Oliver (co-wrote “Girls Trip”), Daniel Steipleman (“On the Basis of Sex” about Ruth Bader Ginsburg, which starts filming in September with Mimi Leder directing), Gersh Dorothy Blyskal (Clint Eastwood’s “The 15:17 to Paris”), Pulitzer Prize-nominated playwright Sarah Ruhl (adapting Gloria Steinem’s memoir “My Life on the Road” with Julie Taymor confirmed to direct), Samuel V. Franco and Evan Kilgore who most recently sold their spec screenplay “Keeper of the Diary” to Fox Searchlight in a six figure bidding war, with Weimaraner Republic producing and Ansel Elgort attached to star), and John Whittington (“Lego/Batman”).The winner of the Audience Award presented will be announced in the festival’s wrap-up announcement. The award is a non-cash prize presented to the highest-rated film as voted by the WFF audience. The complete festival wrap-up will be announced on Tuesday, December 5.The Whistler Film Festival is funded by the Government of Canada through Telefilm Canada and Western Economic Diversification, and by the Province of British Columbia and the Resort Municipality of Whistler, is supported by the Whistler Blackcomb Foundation and the American Friends of Whistler, and is sponsored by Variety, Creative BC, The Harold Greenberg Fund, the Canadian Media Producers Association, Cineplex, SW Event Technology, Remax Sea to Sky Real Estate, Whistler Blackcomb, Tourism Whistler, and the Westin Resort & Spa Whistler. Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Whistler, B.C. (December 3, 2017): The votes are in! Winners of the 2017 Whistler Film Festival were announced at the Awards Celebration this morning on the final day of the 17th annual Festival. Ian Lagarde’s first feature ALL YOU CAN EAT BUDDHA, and Jason and Carlos Sanchez’s A WORTHY COMPANION tied for the $15,000 cash prize presented by the Directors Guild of Canada, British Columbia and the $15,000 post-production prize sponsored by Encore Vancouver in the 14th edition of the coveted Borsos Competition for Best Canadian Feature Film. The jury states “each in their own way convey unique visions and creative storytelling the jury believes have made and will make powerful contributions to the world of cinema.”A WORTHY COMPANION takes a fresh and new perspective that explores the complexity and humanity within the predator, victim relationship. This film questions how we perpetuate manipulative power dynamics between adult and child through the inner struggle of our female protagonists. ALL YOU CAN EAT BUDDHA is a movie that pushes the boundaries of image and sound and proposes an unusual, and assured cinematic narrative that juxtaposes dream and reality in a lost paradise.In addition, the jury awarded Ian Lagarde with the Best Borsos Director Award presented by the Directors Guild of Canada, British Columbia. Ian presents an innovative voice in filmmaking that writes its own rules through a free spirited vision forcing the viewer to rethink their expectations of narrator cinema.last_img read more

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NCAA finds no new violations at OSU

The NCAA has informed Ohio State that the university will not face charges of failing to monitor its football team. The NCAA report also said it has not uncovered any new violations by OSU officials or players. The NCAA agreed with the university that former head coach Jim Tressel was the only university official aware of any violations by football players. “The enforcement staff, institution and Tressel are in substantial agreement as to the facts of both allegations and that those facts constitute violations of NCAA legislation,” according to the statement that OSU received Thursday and released on Friday. “There are no remaining issues regarding either allegation.” The statement reiterated that Tressel’s actions were wrong, that he acted alone, failed in his duty to report violations and wrongfully fielded ineligible players. “Other than (two names redacted) and (Ted) Sarniak, there is no indication that Tressel provided or discussed the information he received from (Chris) Cicero with anyone else, particularly athletics administrators,” the statement said. The statement said the need for a hearing is necessary due to the nature of the case, but there are no new violations to be reported. “Nonetheless, the enforcement staff believed that a hearing was appropriate, rather than a summary disposition report, due to the nature of unethical conduct involving the head football coach,” the statement said. Due to this response from the NCAA, the university is not going to face charges of a lack of institutional control or failure to monitor. That means OSU will not face the harshest penalty the NCAA has to offer, the death penalty, which could have prevented the Buckeyes from participating in the 2011 football season. On Aug. 12, when OSU will meet with the NCAA on these violations, the university could learn what punishments the NCAA could give to the university. “The enforcement staff reviewed information related to the institution’s education and monitoring efforts prior to and during the time frame of the violations but concluded that a failure to monitor charge was unwarranted,” the NCAA informed OSU. The NCAA said it believed the university provided student athletes with proper education on compliance protocol. “The institution demonstrated that each fall and spring during the time frame of the violations, it provided education to football student-athletes and staff regarding extra benefits and preferential treatment,” the NCAA continued. “Thus, the student-athletes were aware that it was impermissible to receive payment, benefits and free or discounted services on the basis of their athletics reputation or skill.” In April 2010, local attorney Chris Cicero sent Tressel an email saying that several players were involved with a now-convicted drug dealer. Cicero said this tattoo parlor owner and drug dealer, Edward Rife, had several pieces of memorabilia belonging to current student athletes. In March, Tressel, university president E. Gordon Gee and athletic director Gene Smith, addressed the media and public that Tressel had knowledge of these violations without reporting them. Tressel resigned from his post of head football coach on May 30. Since his resignation, the terms have changed to a retirement, and the original $250,000 fine inflicted on him was waived. Former quarterback Terrelle Pryor, one of the players involved in the scandal, left the university on June 8 to pursue a professional career in the NFL. In addition to Pryor, five other players that received suspensions because of their affiliation with Rife and the tattoo parlor. Wide receiver DeVier Posey, running back Dan Herron, linemen Mike Adams and Solomon Thomas all received a five game suspension in 2011. Linebacker Jordan Whiting also received a one-game suspension. A Columbus news station, WBNS-10TV, reported Friday that Tressel verbally disclosed the tip he received about the players’ involvement with Rife around Dec. 16, when he was interviewed as part of OSU’s internal investigation. This information differs from the investigation by the NCAA that Tressel disclosed the information to university officials in January. The university “categorically” denied the report by 10TV, standing by the facts presented by the NCAA in its statement to the university. read more

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Ohio State womens basketball falls to Wisconsin 8271

Sophomore guard Cait Craft (13) attempts to beat a defender during a game against Michigan State Jan. 26 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU lost, 82-68.Credit Kaily Cunningham / Multimedia editorThe inconsistency continues for the Ohio State women’s basketball team.The Buckeyes (14-11, 4-5) fell on the road to the Wisconsin Badgers (10-11, 3-6) Sunday, 82-71, despite having four players scoring in double figures.OSU trailed by as many as 22 points in the second half, only to cut it to seven with just 2:39 left after a free throw by sophomore guard Ameryst Alston.That is as close as the Buckeyes would get for the remainder of the game.OSU was led by junior guard Raven Ferguson, who poured in 17 points off the bench for the Buckeyes but also fouled out for the second time in conference play.OSU was outrebounded 49-34 in the game and allowed 24 second-chance points for the Badgers who shot 47.5 percent from the field.Senior center Ashley Adams, who has been a factor of late for the Buckeyes, scored only two points and grabbed one rebound in 10 minutes of play.The Buckeyes did receive solid play from senior center Darryce Moore who tallied 15 points and eight rebounds in 24 minutes in a starting role.The Badgers not only dominated the boards, they were able to shut down Alston, who was coming off of a career-high game with 31 points against Illinois Jan. 30. Alston was held to just 11 points on 4-13 shooting.Wisconsin also had four players score in double figures including two who tied for a game-high 21 points. Junior forward Jacki Gulczynski and redshirt-junior center Michala Johnson each scored 21 and combined for 22 rebounds against the Buckeyes.The Buckeyes will attempt to avoid losing two games in a row for the second time this season in conference play Thursday as they are set to travel to West Lafayette, Ind., to take on the No. 19 Purdue Boilermakers (15-7, 5-5). The Buckeyes won the first meeting between the two teams in Columbus Jan. 2, 89-78. read more

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