Guyana retain IGG Volleyball title

first_imgBy Rawle Toney in SurinameGUYANA continued their dominance in Volleyball at the Inter Guiana Games (IGG) when they defeated Suriname in straight sets (25-22, 25-20, 25-21) to retain their title.Having won the first game 25-17, 25-22 and 25-14, the Levi Nedd-coached team entered yesterday’s game optimistic of repeating their performance from the first day of competition.Renaldo Bobb, Andy Rohoman and Omari Joseph were the outstanding performers in the two matches, but Nedd noted Hellond Singh as the ‘game changer’.According to Nedd who is also the president of the Berbice Volleyball Association (BVA), he’s happy that the players were able to keep Guyana’s rich tradition of winning volleyball (male) at the IGG.Nedd stated that if the current crop of players is eligible for the tournament next year, through the BVA and the series of schools tournament planned, Guyana will be able to present a very strong team.last_img read more

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10 months agoBarcelona coach Valverde welcomes deal for Jeison Murillo

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Barcelona coach Valverde welcomes deal for Jeison Murilloby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona coach Ernesto Valverde has welcomed the deal for Jeison Murillo.The defender joins Barca on-loan from Valencia with the option to buy.”We are in a delicate moment with our centre-backs and so far we have managed it well, but we don’t know how it will go going forward,” Valverde explained in a press conference on Friday.”We took into account the situation of the club and we wanted someone on loan who could play immediately and who knew the league well.”Murillo met those requirements and he can help us in the short term so the club did a good job with his signing.”Signings at this club need to be familiar with us as we’re continuing our fight for two major competitions soon and we couldn’t have brought along players who need to adapt.”Murillo is a good player who can help us and be important for us so we will push forward and hope for the best.” last_img read more

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a month agoBurnley fullback Matt Lowton: Excited by season prospects

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Burnley fullback Matt Lowton: Excited by season prospectsby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveBurnley fullback Matt Lowton believes the foundations are in place for a successful season as he prepares to head back to former club Aston Villa.The Clarets are sitting ninth in the Premier League table with eight points from their opening six games.“We finished strong and we wanted to make sure we took that into this season,” said the Clarets’ right-back to Burnley’s website.“We’re very happy with the way we’ve started. We have got a lot of points on the board and but for a late goal at Wolves it could have been a few more.“There’s probably been only one half of football (at Brighton) where we’ve not been where we wanted to be, and we put that right last weekend, so the way we have started we’ve got a great platform to build on.“We didn’t start last season the way we wanted to and we were down the bottom and struggling a little bit. It’s hard to get the results together when you are looking over your shoulder.“The way we have started this time has given us a great platform to kick on and hopefully we can do what we did a couple of seasons ago.” last_img read more

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Visa joins other major credit cards in getting rid of signature requirement

MasterCard, Visa plan group focused on security The days of signing the receipt after a credit card purchase are numbered. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Visa joins other major credit cards in getting rid of signature requirement (2018, January 19) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-visa-major-credit-cards-signature.html Explore further ©2018 The Mercury News (San Jose, Calif.) Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. Visa, the largest U.S. credit card issuer, became the last of the major credit card companies to announce its plan to make signatures optional.Visa announced it will get rid of its signature requirement for cards with EMV chips starting in April. EMV—which stands for Europay, Mastercard and Visa—chips are the square contact pads on the front side of cards, which have been adapted by major companies as the standard for credit cards internationally.However, this change does not apply to every credit card in circulation; older credit cards without EMV chips will still require signatures for authentication.Visa joined American Express, Discover, and Mastercard in the phase-out. Mastercard was the first one to announce the move in October, and American Express and Discover followed suit in December.”Visa is committed to delivering secure, fast and convenient payments at the point of sale,” said Dean Sanford, Visa’s vice president of consumer products. “Our focus is on continually evolving the market towards dynamic authentication methods such as EMV chip, as well as investing in emerging capabilities that leverage advanced analytics and biometrics.”Since 2011, Visa has deployed more than 460 million EMV chip cards and EMV chip-enabled readers at more than 2.5 million locations. The main effect of EMV chips has been a drop in fraud; businesses that accepted EMV cards reported a 66 percent decline in fraud in the first two years of EMV deployment.In Canada, Australia and most of Europe, credit cards have long abandoned the signature for the EMV chip and a PIN to authenticate the transaction, like one does with a debit card. read more

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Google parent Alphabet reports 3 bn loss on tax provision

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Google parent Alphabet reports $3 bn loss on tax provision (2018, February 1) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-google-parent-alphabet-bn-loss.html Alphabet/Google profit jumps 43% to $4.9 bn Explore further Google parent company Alphabet on Thursday reported a quarterly loss of $3 billion as it set aside $11 billion for taxes on its overseas profits being brought back to the United States. The California tech giant said revenues in the last three months of 2017 rose 24 percent from a year ago to $32.3 billion and cited “great growth” for the company.Shares in Alphabet slid 2.4 percent to $1,139.05 in after-hours trade, amid concerns over profits below expectations.Google remained the key driver of revenue and profit for the company, which has reorganized into new divisions for self-driving vehicles, life sciences and other so-called “moonshot” projects.The Google segment accounted for $31.9 billion in revenue and delivered an operating profit of $8.8 billion.Excluding the tax provision—following the lead of other multinationals taking advantage of a favorable rate to repatriate earnings—Alphabet would have posted a profit of $6.8 billion. “Our business is driving great growth, with 2017 revenues of $110.9 billion, up 23 percent year on year, and fourth quarter revenues of $32.3 billion, up 24 percent year on year,” chief financial officer Ruth Porat said.”Our full year operating income growth continues to underscore our core strength, and on top of this, we continue to make substantial investments for the long-term in exciting new businesses.”Alphabet’s “other bets” category delivered revenue of $409 million, up from $262 million a year earlier. The loss from those projects narrowed to $916 million from $1.1 billion. © 2018 AFP read more

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Cybersecurity experts say device makers have duty to keep users safe from

Off-the-shelf smart devices found easy to hack Explore further Well-connected smart devices at home and in healthcare are currently vulnerable to hacking, warn two new reports. Citation: Cybersecurity experts say device makers have ‘duty to keep users safe’ from hacking (2018, March 20) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-cybersecurity-experts-device-makers-duty.html The reports, led by Professor Nick Jennings, artificial intelligence expert and Vice Provost at Imperial College London, were published by the Royal Academy of Engineering.The cyber security experts who authored the reports, said although taking personal responsibility for safety is important, many smart device users don’t necessarily know the best way to do so.Manufacturers and the government therefore have a greater duty to protect device users from hacking, and the burden of cyber security should not lie solely with device users, the reports said.Genuine harmThe authors highlighted several ways hackers could harm people and their homes.Pacemakers, which regulate heartbeat, use wireless signals to give doctors medical data without surgery. A hacker could take control and alter the signal or switch it off completely, with major health implications.Other vulnerable devices include MRI machines and medical pumps like those used to treat diabetes – potentially allowing remotely based wrongdoers to cause fatal overdoses.In the home, smart home devices such as smart thermostats learn home occupiers’ schedules to know when to turn on and off. In the wrong hands, this could tell burglars when the home will be empty.Voice activated light bulbs could be used to spy on conversations, and smart plug sockets could be turned on remotely, potentially causing fires.Professor Jennings warned: “If the government and manufacturers don’t keep on top of smart technology, wrongdoers could cause people genuine harm, and even death in extreme circumstances.”How can manufacturers protect us?The reports suggest using a kitemark-style system to guarantee security to users from hacking. This would also act as a promise that the software will be updated regularly as and when threats change.They also recommend that governments impose regulations on manufacturers to ensure legal compliance with modern cyber security standards. The authors also say good cyber security practices, or cyber hygiene, should also be taught from primary school.How can we keep ourselves safe from hacking?Professor Jennings and colleagues recommend practicing good cyber hygiene, which includes turning off smart assistants when they’re not in use, keeping separate ‘Home’ and ‘Guest’  WiFi connections, and ensuring any updates are regularly installed.They said: “Internet enabled devices are and can be hugely beneficial, particularly to the elderly or disabled. However, we are now in a transitional period where manufacturers must take responsibility, or be made to by the government.””Internet of Things: realising the potential of a trusted smart world”, by PETRAS & the Royal Academy of Engineering. Credit: Imperial College London Provided by Imperial College London More information: Cyber safety and resilience: www.raeng.org.uk/publications/ … afety-and-resilience This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

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