Geology Sale

first_imgWe need to clear the deck of geology news.  Here’s a garage sale of interesting headlines, provided “as is” for researchers to pursue further.Geo-researchers making diamonds out of odd materials, including peanut butter (PhysOrg):  “Robson points out that despite a lot of effort, scientists still don’t know the true composition of the Earth’s core and its upper and lower mantle.” Regarding the peanut butter diamond: “As a publicity stunt, the team also tried pressing peanut butter, which loosed a lot of hydrogen, but because of its high carbon content, also resulted in the creation of a small diamond.”Continents may not have been created in the way we thought (The Conversation):   Nick Rawlinson questions simplistic plate tectonics.  “What does this mean for geology? It shows us that continents form in more complex ways than we thought.”Earth’s magnetic field could flip within a human lifetime (Science Daily): “Earth’s last magnetic reversal took place 786,000 years ago and happened very quickly, in less than 100 years — roughly a human lifetime. The rapid flip, much faster than the thousands of years most geologists thought, comes as new measurements show the planet’s magnetic field is weakening 10 times faster than normal and could drop to zero in a few thousand years.”Fossils cast doubt on climate-change projections on habitats (PhysOrg):  “Leave it to long-dead short-tailed shrew and flying squirrels to outfox climate-modelers trying to predict future habitats.”  Of short-tailed shrew fossils: “”It’s almost as though it is living in all of the places that the model says it shouldn’t be living in and not in any of the places that the model says it should be living in.”   Since the models are wrong, “The thing I want to do, as a scientist, is to have the best models possible so as we’re making informed decisions as a society.”Small volcanic eruptions could be slowing global warming (PhysOrg):  “Climate projections typically don’t include the effect of volcanic eruptions, as these events are nearly impossible to predict…. Ridley said he hopes the new data will make their way into climate models and help explain some of the inconsistencies that climate scientists have noted between the models and what is being observed.”  Do these two entries indicate that some geologists are becoming more bold at contradicting the politics of consensus?Life’s wrinkles in the sand (Astrobiology Magazine): “A new study shows how wrinkle structures can form on a bed of sand when waves and micro-organisms are present.  Wrinkle structures on sandy bed surfaces are rare on Earth today, but were more common in ancient sedimentary environments.”Old textbook knowledge reconfirmed: Decay rates of radioactive substances are constant (Science Daily): “Researchers refute the assumption that the decay rate of some radioactive nuclides depends on the distance between the Earth and the Sun.”Arroyo channel head evolution in a flash-flood–dominated discontinuous ephemeral stream system (GSA Bulletin): “Multiple stepwise linear regression indicates that the migration rate is most strongly correlated with flow duration and total precipitation and is poorly correlated with peak flow depth or time-integrated flow depth. The studied channel heads migrated upslope with a self-similar morphologic form under a wide range of hydrological conditions, and the most powerful flash floods were not always responsible for the largest changes in landscape form in this environment.”Desert streams: deceptively simple (Science Daily): “Paradoxically, such desert streams have surprisingly simple topography with smooth, straight and symmetrical form that until now has defied explanation.”Sticky issues arising from high-viscosity magma: Settling arguments on magmatic structures (Geology, open access editorial by James K. Russell): “Textures and structures in rocks, whether sedimentary, metamorphic or igneous, are a key source of information on “relative timing” of events. However, their interpretation in terms of physical and chemical processes can be ambiguous.”Profile of a paleo-orogen: High topography across the present-day Basin and Range from 40 to 23 Ma (Geology): “Many tectonic reconstructions of the North American Cordillera suggest the presence of an Altiplano-like plateau in the location of the modern Basin and Range, with conflicting timing and mechanisms for the onset of surface-lowering extension and orogen collapse.”  The authors propose a 11,000-ft “paleo-orogen” that must have existed before the present topography.Catastrophic emplacement of the gigantic Markagunt gravity slide, southwest Utah: Implications for hazards associated with sector collapse of volcanic fields (Geology): “The MGS thus represents one of the largest subaerial volcanic landslides on Earth, and along with the comparable Heart Mountain gravity slide in northwest Wyoming, constitutes a class of catastrophic collapse hazard not widely recognized within modern volcanic fields.”  See map on Science Magazine: “Ongoing fieldwork suggests that the Markagunt slide is substantially larger than first estimated, Biek says. That would dethrone the Heart Mountain slide as the world’s largest, he notes.  But the size of the Markagunt gravity slide isn’t the only interesting thing about the new study, Smith says: ‘It never ceases to amaze me how geologists can go into an area we think we know well and find new things.’”Clues to one of the world’s oldest craters revealed (PhysOrg): “Thus, it seems that a comet with a chondritic refractory component may have created the world-famous Sudbury basin,” geologists say.Update 11/19/14: A book review was just published in Nature about Martin Rudwick’s latest work, Earth’s Deep History: How it Was Discovered and Why it Matters.  Rudwick, a historian of geology, is no friend of young-earth positions, but is compassionate and realistic about early geologists who were.  Quote from Ted Nield’s review:Yet far from being stifled by what had gone before, they were profoundly aided by the work of traditional, historical and antiquarian scholars working in the Judaeo-Christian tradition. The image of emergent science heroically struggling against obscurantist religion is a fiction conjured by post-Darwinian revisionism and militant atheists, Rudwick insists.Rudwick describes a pivot in the “narrative” at the time of Darwin.  “Most people today would categorize Darwin as a biologist, but his view of species derived from his geologist’s instinct that all things embody a historical narrative,” Nield writes.  “The realization that much of Earth’s history was not just prehistoric but prehuman gave birth to what we now call deep time.”  Another name for a historical narrative is a paradigm; it tends to guide what questions are asked, and how they are to be answered.These links are offered as a resource to creation geologists and anyone else willing to think outside the box of scientific consensus.Paradigms are falling down, falling down, falling down;Paradigms are falling down, Lyell’s shady.(Visited 23 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Liberty Is an Anti-Darwinian Concept

first_imgThe Darwinian worldview that allegedly freed people from ‘religion’ actually enslaves them to the worst kind of tyranny.In the United States today, Americans will celebrate Independence Day with parties, barbecues, and fireworks. Hopefully mixed in with the fun is some appreciation for the founding principles of America:All men are created equalHuman rightsLife, liberty, and the pursuit of happinessLiberty and justice for allE pluribus unum (out of many, one)In God we trustThe American dreamAll of these ideals are profoundly anti-Darwinian. The secular worldview in vogue today, resting on Darwin’s advocacy of nature run by unguided natural processes, cannot derive any of these. In fact, the opposite is true: secularism undermines every one of these, and historically, has fought against them.Darwin and his successors limited all scientific explanation to chance and natural law. The natural law Darwin is famous for was natural selection, which is simply a restatement of the Stuff Happens Law. Natural selection, therefore, gets subsumed within the ‘chance’ category. Chance, we know is not a scientific explanation at all. It means, “The unknown and unpredictable element in any event that has no assignable cause or guidance from a natural law or intelligent category.” As such, it represents the “other” category when natural law is exhausted. It is not a cause. It is not an explanation. It is empty of meaning.Credit: Illustra MediaWhat natural laws are left? Well, there are Newton’s laws of motion. There is universal gravitation. There are the laws of thermodynamics. Toss in Einstein’s relativity and quantum mechanics. You can add any other so-called ‘laws of nature’ into the mix, and you will not find liberty. Or justice. Or equality. None of these physical laws can produce any of the American ideals, because the ideals involved concepts, not particles subject to mathematically-describable forces. To the extent they are mathematically describable, they are not free. Particles must act the way the laws say they will. (For radical empiricists, who describe laws as patterns in experience, they would say particles “do” act the way the laws say, not that they “must” act that way.)There is no liberty in physics. Physicists speak of “free parameters” but those are merely starting conditions. They do not change the deterministic outcomes (except for some quantum effects, which typically operate at the nanometer scale, as in radioactive decay). There is no justice in physics. The laws are as they are. No human is at liberty to change them, or to choose a different universe with different laws to live in.Many Darwinians deny free will. The late William Provine stressed this point. So much for liberty. According to Richard Dawkins, we are pawns of our selfish genes. But do genes have liberty to mold us according to their selfish desires? Of course not; they are particles that ultimately obey the laws of physics, or chance. Liberty is not chance; it is a choice against alternatives—one option, to the exclusion of another. Information can be described that way: a choice to put together certain letters—to the exclusion of others—to convey meaning that an intelligent agent chooses to communicate.Hall of Liberty, Forest Lawn, Hollywood, California (DFC)Because natural selection was often twisted into Social Darwinism, assuming that “survival of the fittest” implied a “struggle for existence,” Darwinian evolution bore much anti-liberty fruit. The genocides of the 20th century, extending into the 19th century, were motivated by Darwin’s “law of nature” (law of the jungle) where, since only the “fittest” survive, it was necessary to prove oneself the fittest by putting down everyone else. Dr. Jerry Bergman has documented outrageous atrocities that Darwinians committed in his books The Darwin Effect and How Darwin Corrodes Morality. There were actually Darwinians (beginning with Darwin himself) who believed that charity to the weak and the poor was against nature, because it undermined survival of the fittest. Some took it upon themselves to exterminate the weak and sick as a duty to nature. Certainly Hitler felt this way, but he was not alone; the communist dictators used the same justification.The Cold War pitted two opposite worldviews against each other: the “free world” led by the Americans who believed in liberty, and the “communist bloc” (or “evil empire” as Reagan called it) who followed Darwinism to its logical conclusions: the view that nature favors the powerful, whether individual or collective. Bergman shows how the Japanese had fallen for Darwinism before World War II. Their belief in “emperor worship” was not religious, but Darwinian. Needless to say, the worst totalitarian dictatorships the world has ever seen relied on Darwinian views.Some will argue that America’s founding fathers were not Biblical creationists, but deists. Some were; some were not. But even the deists like Thomas Jefferson believed in intelligent design and divine providence (see John West argue this at Evolution News). Their deity was not distant and uninvolved. Jefferson penned the consensus of the fathers in the Declaration of Independence drafted July 2, 1776, but proclaimed on July 4: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”Those who are attracted to socialism ignore history at their peril. With Darwinian dictators, you only get one vote, one time.The Liberty Bell in Philadelphia is inscribed with the words of Leviticus 25:10, “Proclaim LIBERTY Throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants Thereof.” If you desire liberty, follow Jesus Christ. He quoted Isaiah 61 in the synagogue in Nazareth, expressing his heart for man’s welfare, while identifying with God—thereby claiming deity and expressing the heart of God the Father as well: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to the captives and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed” (Luke 4:18).Detail of mosaic, Liberty Hall, Forest Lawn, California (DFC)(Visited 502 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Gallery: South Africa at 2010 Expo Shanghai

first_imgCompiled by Mary Alexander View and download in high resolution photographs of South Africa’s pavilion at the massive Expo 2010 Shanghai , a six-month fair showcasing the best the countries of the world can offer, held in the largest centre of commerce and finance on mainland China and expected to attract 100-million visitors.The pavilion was officially opened on 6 May by South Africa’s international relations minister, Maite Nkoana-Mashabane. Read the full story .Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.  • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image MORE GALLERIESlast_img read more

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Centralised tender system ‘will root out corruption’

first_img17 February 2014Centralising the government’s tender system will go a long way towards rooting out corruption in South Africa’s public service, President Jacob Zuma said on Sunday.Speaking in an interview with national television, Zuma said the fight against corruption would be better won when there was a central board in place to deal with all tenders. It would also make it easier to police corrupt officials.In his State of the Nation address last Thursday, Zuma said a central tender board would be established to adjudicate tenders in all spheres of government. The board, he said, will work with the chief procurement officer, whose main function would be to check on pricing and adherence to procedures as well as fairness.“The problem is that if you spread the tender system across all spheres of government, you have got too many fingers everywhere. It is difficult to control that,” Zuma told the SABC on Sunday.Zuma said the problem with having too many panels deciding on their own tenders was that it exposed the system to infiltration by corrupt officials, which often led to people in the entire tender system being perceived to be corrupt.With the new system, corruption, if it occurred, would be limited to one board and relatively easy to investigate.Anti-corruption hotline ‘yielding results’In his State of the Nation address, Zuma said the campaign to clamp down on corruption in South Africa’ public service was yielding results.“Since the launch of the National Anti-Corruption Hotline by the Public Service Commission, over 13 000 cases of corruption and maladministration have been referred to government departments for further handling and investigation,” Zuma said.Through the hotline, more than R320-million rand had been recovered from perpetrators, 1 542 officials had been dismissed from the public service and 204 officials prosecuted, Zuma reported.At the same time, the police’s Special Investigating Unit was busy investigating maladministration or alleged corruption in a number of government departments and state entities, through 40 proclamations signed by Zuma since 2009.“We will keep the public informed of the outcome of the investigations,” Zuma said.In the first six months of last year, he added, the state’s Asset Forfeiture Unit had paid a total of R149-million into the Criminal Assets Recovery Account and to the victims of crime.“This is 170% above its target of R55-million and is higher than it has ever achieved in a full year.”Regarding corruption in the private sector, Zuma noted that the country’s competition authorities had investigated large-scale price fixing in the construction industry last year and fined guilty companies R1.4-billion.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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Done right, urbanisation can boost living standards in Africa

first_imgAfrica is urbanising later and at a lower income level than other developing regions, which means policy makers can learn from the successes and failures of other countries. Done right, urbanisation could significantly raise both productivity and living standards across the continent. An aerial view of Lagos, the most populous city in Nigeria, the second fastest growing city in Africa – after Bamako in Mali – and the seventh fastest growing in the world. In 2014 Lagos was reported to have a metropolitan population of 21-million, making it the largest metropolitan area in Africa. (Image: Wikimedia Commons)Patricia Jones, University of OxfordSub-Saharan African countries are urbanising fast. Currently, 335-million people are living in urban areas across the continent and this number is expected to double in the next 25 years.But as African cities have grown so have their problems. They are more congested than they were a decade ago, commuting times have increased and there is growing evidence that air pollution is on the rise.Most African governments have found it difficult to expand public services and infrastructure fast enough to keep up with their growing populations. This has led to an expansion of informal settlements. According to UN Habitat, more than 60% of all residents in African cities now live in slums.But the news is not all bad. Most of Africa’s urbanisation is yet to come so there is still time to get things right. Africa is urbanising later and at a lower level of income than other developing regions (see graph below) which means that African policy makers can learn from the successes and failures of other countries. Done right, urbanisation has the potential to significantly raise both productivity and living standards across Africa.Figure 1: Urbanisation and developing regionsSource: Author’s calculation based on World Development Indicators (2012)Cities are engines of growthUrbanisation is central to the growth process. As countries develop, workers move from rural to urban areas in search of higher paying and more productive jobs. Similarly, entrepreneurs choose to locate their firms in cities where localised economies increase their productivity. This is why cities are viewed as engines of growth.Historical data support this view. Since the industrial revolution, cities have become centres for industrial production and, as cities grow, so have the countries where they are located. The robust relationship between levels of urbanisation and per capita income can be seen in data mapping trends of economic growth against urbanisation. (See graph below).Figure 2: Urbanisation and economic developmentSource: Author’s calculation based on World Development Indicators (2012)Economic growth happens when workers shift out of low-productivity activities such as agriculture and into high-productivity activities, such as manufacturing and some service activities. Urbanisation generates growth in two primary ways: urban jobs tend to be more productive than rural jobs and productivity changes are larger in urban areas than in rural areas.In poor countries, where the majority of workers are employed in agriculture, economic growth is driven primarily by rural to urban migration. For rich countries, economic growth is primarily driven by higher productivity changes in urban areas compared with rural areas.Cities are engines of growth for a range of other reasons too. It is cheaper to provide infrastructure when populations are large and people are densely packed together.Spatial proximity also makes it easier for individuals to learn from each other. There is increasing evidence that knowledge spillovers play a key role in raising the productivity of successful cities. In the United States, for example, a 10% rise in the percentage of workers with a college degree in cities leads to a 22% rise in per capita metropolitan product.What’s missing in African cities?Historically, the best way for a country to grow is by expanding its manufacturing sector (see graph below). Early industrialisation usually takes place in cities so industrialisation and urbanisation go hand in hand.The problem is that Africa is urbanising without industrialising. Few African cities are expanding their manufacturing sectors – at least not at the same rate as cities in other regions. This is a cause for concern because manufacturing jobs usually pay higher wages than those in agriculture and trade.Figure 3: Manufacturing and economic developmentSource: Author’s calculation based on World Development Indicators (2012).Across Africa, average wages are highest among miners and manufacturing workers. But the mining sector is capital-intensive which means that it employs fewer workers compared to other sectors. Therefore the best way to raise incomes is by increasing the number of manufacturing jobs.Where Africa’s cities are falling shortSuccessful cities serve two functions: they provide liveable environments for workers and their families, and they provide productive environments for businesses.The typical African city is achieving neither. Most African cities score low on every metric of livability such as housing quality, access to public services, and security of tenure.African cities also fall short in terms of productivity. Often firms are unable to take full advantage of being based in cities because of inappropriate regulations and massive under-investment in public infrastructure.On top of that, high urban costs make it difficult for African firms to compete on global markets.These constraints can be eased through better policies, particularly in relation to land access and business regulations.The way forwardGetting the most out of Africa’s rapid urbanisation won’t be easy. There needs to be a focus on proper co-ordination and effective planning.The biggest challenge is to understand how public policies can be used to optimise investments by households and firms. The development of a city is about three investment processes which build assets on land: investment in residential property, in commercial property and in infrastructure.The productivity of these three forms of investment is mutually inter-dependent. These interdependencies give rise to benefits that accrue to parties other than those making the investment (positive externality), which, to be optimised, require coordination through effective planning.Developing countries need to learn how to manage their urbanisation process. The key to success is not simply ensuring that the positive benefits outweigh the negative — it is about creating liveable and productive environments that promote sustained growth.Patricia Jones is Project Manager/Researcher (Urbanisation in Developing Countries) at University of Oxford.This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.last_img read more

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Geocaching with Zorro – A Literary Challenge

first_img SharePrint RelatedFeatured Geocacher of the Month Award WinnersAugust 25, 2011In “Community”Geocaching Evolution – The Themed Multi-CacheSeptember 2, 2010In “Community”Celebrating 10 Years of Event CachesMarch 24, 2011In “Movie References” Zorro makes an appearance at a geocaching eventSometimes geocaching offers much more than a treasure hunting adventure at the intersection of a certain of latitude and longitude. The Long Beach Public Library Foundation in California, USA is tapping into the power of geocaching to encourage kids and adults to crack open the pages of a library book.Geocaching is now part of an annual event called, “Long Beach Reads One Book.” The book selected this year is Zorro by Isabel Allende.  Di LaPlume with the foundation says, “For the first time ever, we are adding geocaching to the lineup [of activities for the event]. For March, we’ve hidden a series of six Zorro-related caches in Long Beach. They are what I would describe as “mini” Multi-Caches. Each cache has its own theme that is related to the story of Zorro.” All the geocache descriptions are in English and Spanish. One of the Zorro-themed geocaches even leads geocachers into a library.Zorro cache containerZorro library cacheLaPlume says the Library Foundation hopes the Zorro-themed geocaches promote literacy,  encourage people to get outside, learn more about the book, and have fun.Geocachers are given some incentive to find more than just one of the caches. LaPlume says, “During the month of March, anybody who finds all six caches can enter to win a special Zorro prize.”So far the caches have been logged dozens of times. Geocachers in the Long Beach, California area still have until the end of March to discover all the caches and earn an additional prize. But the real prize might be that snapping open a geocache leads to more people opening books. Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

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Officials suspended for protocol breach

first_imgTwo Madhya Pradesh education department officials were suspended and a school principal issued a show-cause notice after a breach in protocol at a function attended by Governor Lalji Tandon, an official said on Sunday. ‘Governor upset’The move came after Chief Minister Kamal Nath phoned Mr. Tandon on Saturday on learning that the latter was upset over the incident, while State School Education Minister Prabhuram Choudhary and senior officials also met the Governor, sources said. At a Teachers’ Day function held on Friday, Mr. Tandon had to wait at his residence as Minister Choudhary was late, a development which officials termed as breach of protocol. As per protocol, they said, the Governor leaves for a function from Raj Bhawan only after the Minister arrives at the venue.last_img

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Mushers, fans gather for world’s most famous sled dog race

first_imgView comments Veteran musher Scott Janssen of Anchorage said that for now, he is letting all “the negative stuff go in one ear and out the other,” but will do everything in his power after the race to change the face of the Iditarod.“I run this race because I love the Iditarod and I love my dogs,” said Janssen, a funeral home director known as the Mushing Mortician. “My dogs have been training all year to do this and we’re going to go out there and we’re going to have a great time.”Fans also were concentrating on the race itself. Among them were sisters Liz and Jenny Ott of Bradford, England. The pair first got a desire to see the Iditarod in person after going on a sled dog ride with Iditarod veteran Ryan Redington, grandson of late race co-founder Joe Redington Sr., as part of an Alaska cruise land excursion five years ago.“It’s a bucket list thing,” Liz Ott said.“Something you have to do before you die,” her sister added.ADVERTISEMENT Google honors food scientist, banana ketchup inventor and war hero Maria Orosa LOOK: Iya Villania meets ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ cast in Mexico Families in US enclave in north Mexico hold sad Thanksgiving Michigan ends top-seeded Spartans’ 13-game winning streak But two hours before Saturday’s action got started, a dog on Norwegian musher Lars Monsen’s team got loose and disappeared during preparations for the 11-mile (18-kilometer) run through town. The dog, Hudson, was not immediately found, Iditarod spokesman Chas St. George said.This year’s Iditarod comes amid a plethora of troubles for race organizers, including a former winner’s dog doping scandal, the loss of a major sponsor and increasing pressure from animal rights activists following the deaths of five dogs connected to last year’s race.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutBut on Saturday, the focus for mushers was on the race ahead.“It’s all about the dogs now,” said defending champion Mitch Seavey, a three-time winner. “Dogs are what we focus on. I think that’s why everybody showed up down here on the streets today, it’s because we love the dogs.” Typhoon ‘Tisoy’ threatens Games Musher Aliy Zirkle runs her team during the ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, Saturday, March 3, 2018, in Anchorage, Alaska. Zirkle has finished as high as second in the race. (AP Photo/Michael Dinneen)ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Cheering fans lined the streets as mushers took their dog teams for a short sprint in Alaska’s largest city Saturday for the ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.The morning trek along snow-heaped paths in downtown Anchorage gave supporters a chance to mingle with mushers and their furry teams before the competitive portion of the 1,000-mile (1,600-kilometer) race to Nome begins Sunday to the north in the community of Willow.ADVERTISEMENT John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Read Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university PLAY LIST 01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Pussycat Dolls set for reunion tour after 10-year hiatus Also present for the parade of dog teams were members of the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, which brought five headstones with the names of the Iditarod dogs that died in 2017, including two dogs that died after being dropped from the race. Stuffed toy dogs topped with long-stem red roses were placed in front of the gravestones.PETA, a longtime Iditarod critic, says more than 150 dogs have died in the race over the years, a number disputed by Iditarod officials who have not provided their count despite numerous requests by The Associated Press. PETA also plans to protest at Sunday’s official start of the race and at the finish in Nome.“These dogs are being treated like machines,” said spokeswoman Tricia Lebkuecher. “And they are literally being run to death.”Iditarod officials acknowledged the various problems they’ve faced over the past year have been a growing process for organizers.Perhaps the most challenging issue was the October disclosure that four dogs belonging to four-time winner Dallas Seavey, one of defending champion Mitch Seavey’s sons, tested positive for a banned substance, the opioid painkiller tramadol, after his second-place finish last year behind his father. The race’s leadership faced criticism for not releasing the information sooner.The Iditarod said it couldn’t prove Dallas Seavey administered the drugs to his dogs and didn’t punish him. Since then, the rules have been changed to hold mushers liable for any positive drug test unless they can show something beyond their control happened.Seavey has denied administering tramadol to his dogs. He is sitting out this year’s race in protest over the handling of the doping investigation. Instead, he is in Norway to participate in another sled dog race, the Finnmarkslopet, which begins next week. Mitch Seavey said Dallas called him from Norway Friday night to wish him well in the Iditarod.For this year’s Iditarod, 67 teams are vying for a total purse of $500,000. Organizers say the winner’s share of the prize money will be determined later in the race. LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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Kansas once more favored to win 15th straight Big 12 title

first_imgCristiano Ronaldo speaks out on racism after chants aimed at Kalidou Koulibaly TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening This was not supposed to be one of those years.Yes, the Jayhawks lost their entire backcourt of Devonte Graham, Svi Mykhailiuk and Malik Newman to the NBA. And yes, rival Kansas State returned almost its entire roster from a team that went to the Elite Eight last year, giving the Wildcats a real feeling of confidence heading into the season.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefBut the Jayhawks merely restocked with a bevy of high-profile transfers and five-star recruits, and the result was a No. 1 ranking that they held through much of the nonconference slate. It wasn’t until this past weekend against Arizona State that they lost their first game — without injured big man Udoka Azubuike — that they dropped further than second in the AP poll.Now, the fourth-ranked Jayhawks (10-1) have a final tuneup Saturday against Eastern Michigan before setting their sights on an unprecedented 15th consecutive conference championship. SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue Arizona State guard Rob Edwards, left, knocks the ball away from Kansas guard Quentin Grimes during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Dec. 22, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)LAWRENCE, Kan. — There have been plenty of times over the past 14 years that Kansas was supposed to have a tough test in the Big 12, only for the Jayhawks to emerge on top when March rolled around.The year Texas had Kevin Durant, or Oklahoma boasted Buddy Hield. The years that Jayhawks coach Bill Self had to replace all five of his starters, or that some other up-and-coming program was stocked with the kind of talent that Kansas seems to get every season.ADVERTISEMENT View comments LATEST STORIES SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion “The reality of it is we weren’t going to run the table,” Self said. “Let’s not get carried away, and I hate saying this — you never want to lose — but certainly you’d rather learn from a nonconference loss than a conference loss, so hopefully we get something from (the loss to Arizona State). I think it’s a teaching moment.”Meanwhile, the Jayhawks might have much more competition in the Big 12 than previously thought.The Wildcats (9-2) are coming off an impressive win over Vanderbilt despite losing preseason player of the year Dean Wade to a foot injury. No. 11 Texas Tech (11-1) leads the nation in adjusted defensive efficiency and just gave Duke all it could handle. Iowa State (10-2) got Lindell Wigginton and Solomon Young back from injuries last week and has shown plenty in their absence.“We’ve got good players,” Kansas State coach Bruce Weber said. “If you think about it, Dean was the only underclassman on the first team All-Big 12 last year, and Barry (Brown) was second team. So two underclassmen in an unbelievable league, probably the toughest league I’ve been a part of.“To me,” Weber said, “I don’t think we’ve gotten as much recognition as we should. But I don’t think they care. They’re just driven to be good players and that’s important for me.”ADVERTISEMENT Private companies step in to help SEA Games hostingcenter_img LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next They’re also driven to knock the Jayhawks from their lofty perch in the Big 12.As the league prepares to open its double-round-robin slate next week, here are some story lines:RED RAIDERS RISING: Chris Beard’s team was supposed to take a step back after losing All-Big 12 guard Keenan Evans and freshman standout Zhaire Smith to the pros. But sophomore Jarrett Culver has been playing like an All-American and the Red Raiders have shut down just about everyone they’ve played, even causing the Blue Devils problems in their game at Madison Square Garden.HEALTHY CYCLONES: Iowa State’s only losses have come to Arizona and Iowa, and neither of those is particularly damaging. Marial Shayok has flourished, averaging more than 20 points, and now he’s got a couple of running mates to take off some of the scoring pressure. Wigginton is back from his foot issue and Solomon from a groin injury that sidelined both the first two months of the season.TOUGH TCU: It didn’t take long for Jamie Dixon to turn around TCU, and now the Horned Frogs (11-1) think they can compete for a Big 12 title. They had an early slip-up against Lipscomb but breezed past the rest of their nonconference schedule, winning the Diamond Head Classic earlier this week.SOONERS OR LATER: Lon Kruger has had plenty of teams capable of giving Kansas a run for Big 12 superiority, but this one is putting together a sneak attack. Christian James and No. 25 Oklahoma (11-1) have quietly had one of the better nonconference runs, their only loss coming against Wisconsin.BUMPY COUNTRY ROADS: West Virginia (7-4) returned plenty of talent from last season, including Esa Ahmad and Sagabe Konate. But little has gone right for the Mountaineers, beginning with an early loss to Buffalo and defeats to Western Kentucky, Florida and Rhode Island. MOST READ BREAKING: Corrections officer shot dead in front of Bilibid For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krausslast_img read more

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