Golden Globes to be held bicoastally, with Fey in New York

first_imgNEW YORK (AP) — The 78th Golden Globes will for the first time be held bicoastally, with Tina Fey live in New York and Amy Poehler in Beverly Hills, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association said Tuesday, as the annual Hollywood ceremony adapts to the pandemic. Fey and Poehler, who previously hosted the Globes together, had previously been set to emcee again. This time, though, they will do so from across the country from one another. Fey will host from New York’s Rainbow Room, while Poehler will be at the Globes’ usual home, the Beverly Hilton. The Globes are to take place Feb. 28. Nominees will be announced Wednesday.last_img

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Long and winding road: Beilein arriving at Final Four stage with decades of help, friendship from Boeheim

first_imgATLANTA – John Beilein was beginning his tenure as the head coach at Newfane (N.Y.) High School when he started going to coaching clinics in Central New York. There with Beilein was a young up-and-coming coach named Jim Boeheim, who spoke about the 2-3 zone and was quickly earning the respect of all in attendance.They forged a friendship that lasted decades, even while their paths veered in separate directions. Boeheim quickly built a sparkling resume filled with NCAA Tournament appearances. Beilein spent more than two decades at small Upstate New York colleges and mid-major programs.Their friendship continued through it all.“It goes back for years and years,” Beilein said. “So we became friends during that time, and I have had great respect for him.”On Saturday, Beilein and Boeheim will stand on the same court, on the same sideline, coaching in the same game under the national spotlight in the Final Four. Boeheim is a part of the reason Beilein is here after serving as a mentor, friend and advocate. Now Beilein will try to beat Boeheim for the first time in 10 tries and advance to the national championship.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBeilein said Thursday that Boeheim helped him land his first Division-I coaching position at Canisius. About 10 years later, the friendship became vital once again when Beilein was hired as West Virginia’s head coach in 2002.“I believe he had something to do with me going to the Big East at West Virginia,” Beilein said. “He was very instrumental.”While Boeheim and Syracuse immediately began making NCAA Tournament appearances, Beilein’s career took a more circuitous route. It started at Newfane and continued on to Erie Community College, Nazareth, Le Moyne, Canisius and Richmond before landing at West Virginia, and eventually, Michigan.Through those stops, Beilein said he didn’t think ending up at the Final Four would be possible.“I’m always sort of thinking about what we can do right now to be a better team, what can I do to be a better coach, a better father, a better teacher,” Beilein said. “Always with the idea that if you do all those things, anything is possible in your life.”Beilein credits Boeheim for helping him get here. On Thursday, he also lauded Boeheim for his intelligence. He said Boeheim can discuss a myriad of topics, basketball or otherwise.It’s something he’s known about Boeheim since the two met all those years ago in CNY gymnasiums.“He’s one of the greatest minds in basketball, about anything. The guy is smart,” Beilein said. “You ask him about college football, he’ll tell you. You ask him about North Korea right now, he probably knows all about that. He is a smart guy.”Boeheim said earlier this week he’s always “admired” Beilein’s coaching. He’s watched him climb the coaching ladder at jobs he helped Beilein land, all the way to their collision in the Final Four.“He’s been successful wherever he’s been. I remember him at Erie, Le Moyne, Canisius, Richmond, you name it,” Boeheim said on a teleconference earlier this week. “He’s won every place he’s been. That’s difficult to do.”Beilein is 0-9 against Boeheim and the Orange. His first win against his long-time friend would be the biggest of his career, one that Boeheim influenced. Since those clinics back in the mid- to late-1970s, they’ve been mentor and mentee, friend and adversary.On the Georgia Dome floor, they’ll meet once again with a chance at rising to the top of college basketball on the line. Beilein has watched Boeheim reach three previous Final Fours. The mutual admiration has lasted for decades.Said Beilein: “I followed him and respected him very much.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on April 4, 2013 at 3:49 pm Contact Chris: [email protected] | @chris_isemancenter_img Related Stories Coaches reflect on Rice video, defend professionNot just yet: Boeheim reiterates he doesn’t plan on retiringTheir game: Syracuse entered the 2002-03 season inexperienced, unranked but they ended it national championslast_img read more

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