South Bend releases new 311 online service request portal

first_img Pinterest Facebook Facebook Twitter TAGS311IndianaonlineportalrequestserviceSouth Bend South Bend releases new 311 online service request portal (Photo Supplied/City of South Bend) Submitting a service request is now a little easier for South Bend residents.The City has rolled out a new online service request portal, which allows residents to make requests online in addition to calling the 311 Service Center.There are more than 30 service request options available through the portal, including the option to request street plowing and pothole repairs, and report downed tree limbs in the right of way.Over the last year, 134,360 calls were made to the 311 Service Center. Of those calls, 8,939 were on topics and service requests that are now included in the online portal.The new portal can be found at 311.southbendin.gov. For questions, call 311. WhatsApp Google+center_img Twitter By Brooklyne Beatty – October 28, 2020 0 500 Previous articleSouth Bend’s Winter Restaurant Weeks kick off November 1Next articleNotre Dame receives $700K grant for lead risk study Brooklyne Beatty WhatsApp Pinterest IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Google+last_img read more

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Bravo still committed to play for WI

first_imgMELBOURNE, Australia (CMC):All-rounder Dwayne Bravo says he is still committed to playing for the West Indies, but was forced to quit Test cricket because of the poor treatment meted out to him by selectors.Speaking ahead of his campaign in the Big Bash League for Melbourne Renegades, Bravo told media here that with little interest coming from selectors, he had turned his attention to the lucrative Twenty20 leagues across the globe.”Until earlier this year, I was still interested to play Test cricket, but I have yet to hear anything from any selector, what their plans are for me, what my position is,” Bravo lamented.”I just decided it’s time to move on with my life and try to channel my energy in different places. I would have loved the opportunity to play Test cricket again, but since being dropped back in 2010, I never got the chance and I just decided to call it a day.”He continued: “I’m not shutting down my opportunities to represent the West Indies. I still, 100 per cent, want to play for the West Indies in one-day internationals and T20s.”The 32-year-old played the last of his 40 Tests five years ago after scoring 2,200 runs at an average of 31 and taking 86 wickets at an average of nearly 40. Following this protracted absence from the side, Bravo announced his retirement from the longer format in January this year.Ousted as captainHe was appointed one-day captain in 2013, but axed a year and a half later after he helped lead the players’ fight against the West Indies Cricket Board and the West Indies Players’ Association, which resulted in the controversial abandoned tour of India.Bravo said many West Indies players felt more respected outside of the Caribbean and this was behind their decision to ply their trade in tournaments like the Big Bash.”I get frustrated at times, not only for myself, but for all the other cricketers – Chris Gayle, Darren Sammy, Kieron Pollard, Andre Russell. We all want to represent West Indies,” Bravo said.”But, sometimes, the way we have been treated over the years … why should we actually fight with West Indies’ cricket when the rest of the world opens their arms for us?”Yes, they pay us well, but at the same time, we never feel disrespect in any way when we play for those teams around the world. We feel loved. We feel well-respected. Do we get that type of treatment back in the region? No, we don’t.”With the ICC T20 World Cup slated to bowl off in March next year, Bravo said he was taking nothing for granted about his selection.”I would love to think that I would be good enough and have done enough to get selected for the T20 World Cup, but I’m not saying anything. I don’t know,” he mused.last_img read more

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Immigrants try hand at salon work

first_imgSANTA CLARITA – Mama Rose, Sharon Given and Nancy Nguyen are family, but they do not celebrate the holidays together. Their bond is not one of blood, but it is not just commerce, either. “When you get out of your country and have lost your family, you keep the love and caring for them,” manicurist Nancy Nguyen said. “Instead of sitting and moaning, depressed, you give that love to your clients – as family – as you take care of them the best you can.” Her clients’ loyalty bears this out. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals Sharon Givens – an eight-year devotee whose name Nguyen shortened to make it easier to pronounce – has followed the manicurist to three shops. What used to be a short walk has evolved into a half-hour drive. Mama Rose drove from her lodgings in Thousand Oaks – after traveling from Arizona three days before Thanksgiving – so Nguyen would have time to “cook” her. The cooking process involves a pre-manicure soak so warm you feel you could be listed on the menu between the lobster and prime rib. Clients adore Nguyen in spite of the ritual. “She scalds your hands and feet till you scream,” Givens said. She ran her fingers through a bed of purple glass pebbles lining a bowl as her cuticles softened. “I think I’ve sent her 30 of my friends,” Givens said. “She knows my whole family.” Vietnamese immigrants work in or own a number of nail salons across the Santa Clarita Valley. Many of them have tried their hands at other businesses and careers before settling on this one. Patrons may have no idea the soft hand holding theirs once gripped the hull of a boat headed to an unknown shore. Givens commended Nguyen and fellow manicurist Billy Bui for engaging her in conversation about travels and family and not shutting her out with talk-fests in Vietnamese as they work in their rent spaces at The Nail Garden in Newhall. Mama Rose’s next-door neighbor is 89. She is not a client, but Nguyen cradles her hand anyway. When Nguyen takes her 15-year-old son, Tan, a ninth-grader at Hart High School, to a nearby Spanish tutor, Nguyen visits the older woman, who is “like my grandmother.” “I sit next to her, hold her hand, watch TV while I’m waiting for my son,” she said. Nguyen’s grandmother died in 1998. Tan greets all of his mother’s customers when he stops by, Givens said. “He was only 7 when I met him,” she said. “We’ve all watched him grow up.” On Sundays, Tan learns to read and write Vietnamese at a school in the San Fernando Valley. The boy spoke like a native during a family trip to Vietnam, made before his great-grandmother died. “Nobody knew he was born in the U.S.,” Nguyen said proudly. There is a flip side to perpetuating Tan’s link to his cultural inheritance. It is cultivating gratitude for his American roots, Nguyen said. “I take him there so he can see how lucky he was to be born in the U.S.,” she said. Vietnamese children must work to help support their families, she said. Nguyen’s sister still lives in Vietnam. The women send e-mails and talk every couple of weeks. Nguyen shares the caramel-like candies – dense with banana, peanuts, sesame and ginger – that her sister sends. She was 17 in 1978 when she immigrated to the United States with her uncle and cousin. Her uncle’s friend in Visalia sponsored them. Nguyen stayed on with the family friend to finish high school when her uncle moved to Los Angeles a few years later. Nguyen recalled a favorite teacher at Redwood High School – Mr. Chen – but blanked on his first name. “Laurence!” Mama Rose chimed in from Bui’s station. She lived there once upon a time. After high school, Nguyen studied nursing, juggling English and medical lingo in her brain. She worked as a nurse’s aide at a hospital. Then she married her husband of 16 years, working alongside him in business. “Her husband got her into nails,” Givens said. Nguyen’s husband volunteered her services as a translator to a family friend who ran a nail salon. One thing led to another. Nguyen learned the trade and sank roots in Santa Clarita in 1998. She feels she was divinely guided to this line of work. “There’s a purpose for me here,” she said. “I have no idea why God sits me here to do this.” It may be her answer to an earlier prayer: make sure you send me to be with people because I can’t work with a computer. “Maybe this is why God wants me to be here, to listen, to comfort them in things,” she said. While Nguyen has embraced all things American, she tells customers her Thanksgiving turkey “ran away.” All the way to Las Vegas. And she has to catch up with him. The soft-spoken Bui came to the United States in 1981 when he was 25. He had escaped Communist rule in Vietnam by climbing aboard a fishing boat in the darkness in 1979. The former student huddled side-by-side with nine people for four days, scrambling for a place to sleep. “We had to hide from a guard at the border,” he said of the escape. “If they catch you they put you in jail or they might shoot you if you don’t stop.” The boat captain was his friend. The refugees landed in Hong Kong, where Bui stayed for 5 months. Then he came to California, staying with a friend from Hong Kong who lived in the San Fernando Valley. Six people jammed into two rooms. Bui dragged his mattress into the living room. He stayed in the place for about a year while learning the sheet-metal trade. As he talked, Bui finished off a client’s pedicure, dabbing stray marks of bright red polish with remover. Bui followed a year-and-a-half working sheet metal with 13 years in the ink cartridge business. Then he switched gears, training to become a manicurist. “I had fun. I enjoyed it,” Bui said. Customers were friendly and they helped him master English. He sometimes paints his tiny human canvasses with flowers, favoring airbrush designs. Bui spoke of the Vietnamese tradition of seeking perfection in their handcrafts, suggesting it could be one reason so many immigrants flock to the hands-on nail care business. Many of Bui’s family members still live in Vietnam. Two brothers have settled in Seattle and another lives in Oklahoma City. Bui returned to Vietnam three years ago to attend his father’s funeral. “I believe most of the people who live in Vietnam dream about coming to America,” he said. “I appreciate the American government, especially the people who gave open arms when we came.” Bui, who lives in the San Fernando Valley, said he wishes he could afford to live in Santa Clarita. He is married and has two sons, 18 and 25. Both of them have learned Vietnamese. Bui speaks a smorgasbord of tongues: some French, Spanish and Chinese, and English and Vietnamese. He soaks up culture by visiting the Vietnamese community in Santa Ana, he said. And celebrates Thanksgiving with a potluck. Across town in Saugus, Tan Tran owns Accent Nail and Spa. Like Bui, he fled Vietnam in 1979. He and his brother spent five days aboard a boat headed for Thailand, where they knew no one. The brothers lived in a Thai refugee camp for almost three months before they were sent to the Philippines. They spent eight months waiting for “processing” for the final destination: America. “They tried to teach you English,” he said. “They stopped by every morning. That’s how we learned … how to buy a ticket, food.” Tan settled in Atlanta and worked as a dishwasher and in the sheet-metal trade. He moved to Texas about nine months later in search of his fortune, working on a fishing boat. “After two months I found out there was no way,” he said. He took off for San Francisco, where he worked in a restaurant and as an electronics technician. He bought a furniture store, but it was not meant to be. He made two more forays into the electronics field before finding his pot of gold. In the late 1980s, his wife, Kim, began to learn manicuring. In 1990 they opened their Saugus salon. Now she takes care of the customers while he runs the business. They live in Santa Clarita with their three kids, who are 17, 12 and 3. The kids have learned their parents’ native tongue. Tran last visited Vietnam in 1995 and hopes to go again next year. The couple’s hard work has paid off. Six weeks ago they opened a second nail salon in Valencia. Tran reflected on the 15-year climb. “When I stepped out of my country, I was looking forward to freedom,” he said. “We try day by day and learn day by day, trying to become the best person in this country. “If you can do it, you do it,” he said. Judy O’Rourke, (661) 257-5255 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. 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Termites: If You Can’t Lick ’Em, Mimic ’Em

first_imgTermites, despite their bad rap, have something to teach human homebuilders.  Their mounds are self-sufficient, air-conditioned, environmentally friendly and cheap to run, according to a story in EurekAlert.  “The mounds incorporate a complicated network of tunnels and air conduits designed to channel air flow for the control of internal air quality, temperature and moisture levels.”    A multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers in the UK is studying termite “smart” mounds in 3D for ideas on how human habitats could “meet all energy, waste management and other needs on site.” Maybe the termites in your walls are trying to tell you something: “This is no way to build a house!  Watch us.”  We humans tend to build rectangular things.  The free-form design of termite mounds strikes us as sloppy or makeshift, when really there is a deeper design that provides more efficiency, if we would only shake off our miter-box chauvinism.    Some “cave men” have lived in structures that look remarkably like termite mounds and possess some of the same benefits.  In Cappadocia in the land of Turkey, people have lived in natural cone-shaped caves for thousands of years (click here for pictures and history).  The dwellings are “naturally air-conditioned; cool in hot summers and warm and easy to heat in harsh winters,” according to the Hidden Turkey travel site.  (For wonderful photos of these dwellings, order the Turkey CD-Rom from Bible Places.)  If the trend in biomimetics (engineering that imitates nature) continues, wouldn’t it be an interesting skyline to see New York as a cluster of buildings resembling termite mounds.    This otherwise interesting story is marred by Darwinite hot air that adds nothing but halitosis:“Mounds built by highly-evolved African termites could inspire new types of building that are self-sufficient, environmentally friendly and cheap to run.”“Furthermore, the termites have evolved in such a way that they out source some biological functions, for example, digestive functions to a fungus that they farm inside the mound.”“In fact, in physiological terms, the termites have evolved to outsource many of their homeostatic functions, such as thermo-regulation, respiration, moisture regulation, and even digestion, into the mound structure itself.”As usual, the Darwinites fail to tell us how these termites came up with their efficient and intelligent designs by chance, but just assume they did so, somehow out there on the hot plains of Africa.  Apparently necessity is the mother of emergence (see 02/25/2003 commentary).(Visited 14 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Security breach probe: Pranab Mukherjee bypassed home ministry

first_imgReports that finance minister Pranab Mukherjee’s office was bugged last year have sparked questions whether it was the result of corporate wars or battles within the cabinet. The answers to who planted the bugs may never be found but the murky affair has exposed the fault lines within the government.The P. Chidambaram-led home ministry, which is directly responsible for internal security, was kept completely out of the loop of the probe into how an adhesivetype material was found at 16 places in the finance ministry, including at three spots inside Mukherjee’s room, last year.A security breach was alleged in the offices of Mukherjee and his aides – adviser Omita Paul and private secretary Manoj Pant – besides two conference rooms used by the minister.Government sources on Tuesday conceded that after Mukherjee’s letter to Manmohan Singh last September pointing out the discovery and asking for a secret highlevel probe, the PM’s office did not involve the home ministry into the investigation. The PMO directly contacted the then director of the Intelligence Bureau ( IB), Rajiv Mathur, asking him to probe the matter instead of the home minister or the home secretary, to whom the IB usually reports. ” The home ministry was completely out of the loop till then? Later, anyway, we knew that the IB was probing the matter,” a top source said.The fact that Mukherjee chose to write to the PMO and not to Chidambaram was underlined to point out the fault lines in the government.That the Central Board of Direct Taxes ( CBDT) brought in private investigators to conduct an electronic sweep of the finance ministry’s VVIP chambers also showed the lack of faith in the government’s security and investigating agencies, sources pointed out.advertisementThis was something that the BJP was quick to pick on, as it alluded to a ” civil war” between Mukherjee and Chidambaram. ” Today, the UPA government is completely directionless, rudderless, without leadership and apprehensive. The situation has come to such a pass that the finance minister suspects his office is bugged. The country wants to know who is bugging his office,” BJP spokesperson Shahnawaz Hussain said.Sources said since the episode, counter- surveillance has been stepped up in the top government departments. The IB now does a regular screening swoop of the offices of the finance minister, home minister and the PMO every three days to detect bugs – a far increased frequency to the earlier practice of doing so every fortnight. BUT THE IB sought to play down the incident on Tuesday, as did Mukherjee himself.Sources said the IB found no evidence of any snooping or bugging in the finance ministry and, hence, for the home ministry, it essentially became a ” done and dusted” matter several months ago.The IB had taken all the adhesives found at 16 places in the finance ministry and subjected the same to forensic tests. ” The tests showed it was only chewing gum and nothing else. There was no groove or cavity in places where the chewing gum was spotted? in one of the places, the adhesive had a paint coating on it suggesting that it had been there for several months. But we still can’t say with absolute certainty if bugging devices had been planted earlier using this chewing gum,” the government source said.” The IB closed the matter last October as nothing concrete was found in the probe. To detect a security breach, you have to find a bug – the IB found no recording devices,” the official added. MUKHERJEE, too, said on Tuesday that investigating agencies had found nothing during their probe of the suspected security breach at his North Block office. ” The IB had investigated the matter and they found there is nothing,” he said.But experts said the presence of such material inside the ministry would have been virtually impossible without an insider’s job.Former IB joint director M. K. Dhar said some private parties with vested interests may have used remote- controlled radio bugs to snoop on the minister.He suspected that the parties would have been interested in obtaining details of fiscal and policy matters pertaining to a growing sector of the economy.”It would not have been possible without the collaboration of an insider,” Dhar said.A source also said the incident might have been a case of paranoia on part of certain finance ministry officials. The incident took place last September. This was around the same time when the Nira Radia tapes were leaked and there was concern over leakage of sensitive information.advertisementBut the episode, according to insiders and experts, has raised serious questions on the security of a key ministry such as finance which is run by such a veteran politician as Mukherjee.For more news on India, click here.For more news on Business, click here.For more news on Movies, click here.For more news on Sports, click here.last_img read more

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10 months agoBarcelona coach Valverde welcomes deal for Jeison Murillo

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Barcelona coach Valverde welcomes deal for Jeison Murilloby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona coach Ernesto Valverde has welcomed the deal for Jeison Murillo.The defender joins Barca on-loan from Valencia with the option to buy.”We are in a delicate moment with our centre-backs and so far we have managed it well, but we don’t know how it will go going forward,” Valverde explained in a press conference on Friday.”We took into account the situation of the club and we wanted someone on loan who could play immediately and who knew the league well.”Murillo met those requirements and he can help us in the short term so the club did a good job with his signing.”Signings at this club need to be familiar with us as we’re continuing our fight for two major competitions soon and we couldn’t have brought along players who need to adapt.”Murillo is a good player who can help us and be important for us so we will push forward and hope for the best.” last_img read more

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15 days agoChelsea keeper Kepa insists no Real Madrid regrets

first_imgChelsea keeper Kepa insists no Real Madrid regretsby Carlos Volcano15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea goalkeeper Kepa Arrizabalaga insists he has no regrets missing a move to Real Madrid.Kepa was all set to leave Athletic Bilbao for Real in January 2018, only for Zinedine Zidane to block the switch.He recalled: “It was a few months in which my grandmother saw me more in the newspaper than in person. There was a lot of talk about me. Also because of an injury I was not going through good times.”I was finishing my contract and since January I could talk to teams. I didn’t get to see what happened. “I ended up renewing and with the idea of staying and after six months I left. It’s the only contradiction.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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GSL Upbeat on Small MidSized Boxships

first_imgDespite the depressed overall market, UK’s containership lessor Global Ship Lease (GSL) remains encouraged by the longer-term prospects for small and mid-sized vessels that are the focus of the company’s strategy.“The supply/demand dynamics for those vessels continue to move in the direction of equilibrium, driven by record levels of vessel scrapping, an orderbook heavily skewed towards very large ships, and the continued growth of the non-mainlane trades most reliant upon our vessels,” Ian Webber, GSL’s CEO, explained.The announcement comes on the back of the firm’s financial results which show that GSL suffered a net loss of 68.2 million in 2016, widened from a net loss of USD 31.9 million seen in 2015.Operating revenues stood at USD 166.5 million in 2016, against USD 164.9 million recorded in 2015. According to the company, operating revenues were higher mainly due to the full-year contribution of OOCL Qingdao and OOCL Ningbo, offset by reduced revenue after the sale of Ville d’Aquarius and Ville d’Orion, the effect of the amendments to the charters of Marie Delmas and Kumasi and increased offhire from six scheduled drydockings in 2016, compared to only one in 2015.Additionally, adjusted EBITDA amounted to USD 114.7 million in 2016, compared to EBITDA of USD 108.8 million in 2015.“In 2016, we maintained a strong focus on maximizing the profitability of our long-term, fixed-rate time charters and ensuring our insulation and resilience in the face of a challenging market environment. Throughout the year, we made progress in reducing our vessel operating costs, successfully extending the contract durations of two of our vessels chartered to CMA CGM, and meaningfully strengthening our balance sheet,” Webber added.GSL’s fleet is currently comprised of 18 vessels, with 15 of them chartered to CMA CGM and three to OOCL.last_img read more

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Rep Howell announces January office hours

first_img04Jan Rep. Howell announces January office hours State Rep. Gary Howell of North Branch has announced his local office hours for Monday, Jan. 8 at the following times and locations:9:30 to 11 a.m. at John’s Country Kitchen, 1829 S. Cedar St. in Imlay City; and2:30 to 4 p.m. at Hungry Dan’s Restaurant, 195 W. Genesee St. in Lapeer.“I am looking forward to sitting down with residents in Lapeer County and discussing the important issues facing our community and the state of Michigan in 2018,” Howell said. “As we kick off the new year in Lansing, I remain committed to being open and accessible to the people in my district. I welcome anyone who has ideas, issues, or concerns to join me.”No appointment is necessary. Those unable to attend may contact Rep. Howell at 517-373-1800 or via email at [email protected] Categories: Howell News,Newslast_img read more

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