Updated: Archbishop of Canterbury sets out vision for 2017 primates…

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Posted Feb 1, 2017 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Primates Meeting 2017 Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Consultative Council, center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Primates Meeting, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Updated: Archbishop of Canterbury sets out vision for 2017 primates meeting Episcopal Church Anglican Consultative Council members issue statement on ACNS story’s claims Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Archbishop of Canterbury, Rector Tampa, FL Editor’s note: This post was updated at 5:05 p.m. EST Feb. 1 to add the following statement from the Episcopal Church’s three Anglican Consultative Council members in response to the Anglican Communion News Service story below.Statement from the Episcopal Church’s members of theAnglican Consultative CouncilAs the Episcopal Church’s members of the Anglican Consultative Council, we were dismayed to read in today’s Anglican Communion News Service (ACNS) an article that claims we did not vote on matters of doctrine or polity at the most recent meeting of the ACC, known as ACC-16, held in Lusaka, Zambia in April 2016. This report is wrong.Each of us attended the entire ACC-16 meeting and voted on every resolution that came before the body, including a number that concerned the doctrine and polity of the Anglican Communion. As the duly elected ACC members of a province of the Anglican Communion, this was our responsibility and we fulfilled it.It could be inferred from today’s ACNS story that we did not fulfill our voting responsibilities at ACC-16 to comply with a communique issued by the primates of the Anglican Communion in January 2016.  The communique sought to impose consequences on the Episcopal Church for its adoption of marriage equality at our 2015 General Convention. Such an inference would be incorrect.At the beginning of ACC-16, the Standing Committee of the Anglican Communion issued a statement saying that it had “considered the Communiqué from the Primates and affirmed the relational links between the Instruments of Communion in which each Instrument, including the Anglican Consultative Council, forms its own views and has its own responsibilities.” After ACC-16 had concluded, six outgoing members of the Standing Committee released a letter reasserting that “ACC16 neither endorsed nor affirmed the consequences contained in the Primates’ Communiqué.”As members of the Anglican Consultative Council, we thank God for the time we have spent with sisters and brothers in Christ from across the globe, and for the breadth and diversity of our global Anglican family. We are firmly committed to the Episcopal Church’s full participation in the Anglican Communion, and we hope that, in the future, our participation will be reported accurately by the Anglican Communion News Service.Rosalie Simmonds BallentineIan T. DouglasGay Clark JenningsEpiscopal Church members of the 16th Anglican Consultative Council, Lusaka, ZambiaThe Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, left; Rosalie Simmonds Ballentine, second from right; and Connecticut Bishop Ian T. Douglas, right, pose April 18, 2016, with Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby during the 16th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council in Lusaka, Zambia. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has written to every primate in the Anglican Communion to set out his hopes for the next Primates’ Meeting, which will take place in Canterbury Oct. 2-6.In the letter, Welby sets out his vision for the meeting in Canterbury as an opportunity for relaxed fellowship and mutual consultation. He invites the primates to submit items for the agenda and says he’s aware of the pressures under which many of them live.Full article.Complete Episcopal News Service coverage of the ACC-16 meeting can be found here. Rector Knoxville, TN ACC16, Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Anglican Communion, Primates Meeting 2016 reaction, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Primates Meeting 2016, Submit a Press Release Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

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What experts want you to know about the worst flu season…

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The 2017-2018 flu season rages on, showing no signs yet of slowing down. Hospitals around the country, including our own, have been inundated with record numbers of outpatient flu cases. Nationwide, there have been thousands of hospitalizations and, tragically, at least 37 child deaths.Adding insult to injury, a study released last week brought bad news about how flu is spread. Observing 142 flu-infected patients as they breathed, coughed and sneezed, scientists found that simply breathing contaminated the air around them with the infectious flu virus.Dr. Timothy Hendrix, medical director of Florida Hospital Centra Care urgent care centers, says the study isn’t all that surprising. “Influenza is airborne, which means coughing, sneezing, breathing,” he says. Rather than striking new fears in an already jumpy public, what the study should do, he says, is remind everyone that the best defense against the flu is the flu vaccine.We asked Dr. Hendrix for more advice for navigating this grim flu season. Read on for his expert answers to frequently asked questions about symptoms, treatment and whether or not it’s ever “too late” to get your flu shot.Question #1: Is this flu season really more dangerous or deadly?With all the terrifying and tragic news stories, you may feel like this season’s virus is particularly deadly. Not so, says Dr. Hendrix. While it is severe – one of the most widespread flu seasons in years – that doesn’t necessarily mean a higher risk of complications or death.“The CDC (U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention) predicted this would be a severe season, and they were right,” says Dr. Hendrix. “Severity is the number of people falling ill, but there hasn’t been a higher rate of hospitalizations or mortality.”Highly publicized cases of deaths, particularly among young and healthy people, can amplify that perception. In reality, according to Dr. Hendrix, the rates of hospitalizations and deaths are actually on par with past flu seasons.Question #2: Has flu season peaked?If you asked Dr. Hendrix this question two weeks ago, he would have had a very different answer. But numbers from even the last few days still show steadily climbing rates, with a spike last week in every Florida county.“Over the weekend, it looked like things were declining,” he says. “We were still seeing 200 patients a day [at Centra Care Urgent Care], but Monday came around and we were at 279 patients.”That number, 279, sets a new Centra Care record for the number of flu patients treated in a single day. (The old record, 271, was set just last week.)As for when we can expect those numbers to fall, that’s anyone’s guess. But even after flu season has peaked, Dr. Hendrix warns there’s still a ways to go: “We’re right in the thick of flu season. There’s at least another 10-12 weeks of flu activity left. It’s not going away anytime soon.”Question #3: What’s the best way for me to protect myself?Two words: get vaccinated.Even this late in the flu season, the CDC still recommends flu shots for those who haven’t gotten one. Florida Hospital and Centra Care urgent care centers still have flu shots, and will continue to administer them as long as they are available.“It is not too late to get your shot,” Dr. Hendrix says. “It takes two weeks to reach peak immunity [in the body], which will protect you for the latter half of the flu season.”The benefits of a flu vaccine are twofold: it helps prevent you from catching the flu, and makes the illness shorter and less severe if you do.Question #4: Can’t I just stay home if I have the flu virus?Without a doubt, if you have the flu virus you should stay home from work or school to prevent spreading it to others. But because of incubation periods, you may be contagious before even realizing you’re sick. That means “just staying home” may not be enough.“We should remind everybody that before you get symptoms of the flu, in that 24 hours before you get sick, you are spreading the flu to people around you,” says Dr. Hendrix.Question #5: If I suspect I have flu, should I go to the doctor or ride it out?Even if you’re young and healthy with no pre-existing medical conditions, Dr. Hendrix still recommends going to the doctor for Tamiflu – preferably within 48 hours of onset of symptoms, when the medicine will be most effective.“Tamiflu will shorten the course [of the flu] and get you feeling better faster,” he explains. “It’s the only antiviral that’s effective against the flu virus, and will help limit the spread of flu in the community.”There’s essentially no upside to riding it out. Not only will you be a greater risk to the people around you, you’ll be miserable for up to a week and risk dangerous complications.Question #6: How do I tell if my flu virus has become a medical emergency?“It’s not unusual to hear about unexpected deaths in healthy individuals with no pre-existing medical problems,” says Dr. Hendrix. “That’s why it’s important to recognize when it’s getting bad.”The tell-tale signs of flu are a fever, body aches, chills and a cough – that’s all typical, Dr. Hendrix says. If you develop a severe headache, vomiting, extreme lethargy, difficulty breathing (including shortness of breath or tightness in the chest), or you’re unable to eat or take any liquids, then you should get to the doctor, an urgent care clinic or emergency room.“These symptoms could be an indication that you’re becoming septic, or that pneumonia may be developing,” Dr. Hendrix says. Both of these conditions are extremely serious, and potentially deadly if left untreated. It’s especially important to get medical attention if you have an underlying condition.Question #7: How do I know if it’s the flu or something else?You may have read recent news stories about adenovirus, which can cause symptoms similar to influenza. While the name may be unfamiliar, you probably know it by another moniker: the common cold.“There are other viruses out there, that’s why it’s called cold and flu season,” says Dr. Hendrix. Adenovirus is one of up to 200 different types of cold virus, and it can also cause conjunctivitis of the eye. It’s highly contagious, spread the same way as flu, but complications are rare.“Adenovirus is less severe than the flu, you’re not going to have the high fever,” Dr. Hendrix says. “If you’re coughing and sneezing, but don’t have a fever, it’s probably O.K. stay home and drink your chicken soup.”Save time and money with a virtual visit to the doctor. Florida Hospital eCare provides access to Florida Hospital doctors and nurse practitioners for minor ailments. You see the doctor on your time — through your smartphone or tablet — when it’s convenient for you. Learn more about eCare. Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 The VOICE of HealthFrom Florida Hospital Apopka Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Please enter your comment!center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your name here TAGSFlorida Hospital – ApopkaFlu seasonThe VOICE of Health Previous articleThe transformation of the Super Bowl ad experienceNext articleAmericans are saving energy by staying at home Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 last_img read more

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Blue Cross chosen as official Badminton charity

first_img  18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Blue Cross chosen as official Badminton charity About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 19 November 2007 | News Animal welfare charity The Blue Cross has announced that it has been chosen as the 2008 Charity of the Year at one of the world’s most famous equestrian events, the Mitsubishi Motors Badminton Horse Trials.The Blue Cross will be permitted to collect donations at the event next May. One of the cross-country fences at Badminton will be named in the charity’s honour and Blue Cross horses will lead out the competitors’ parade at the end of the event.The Blue Cross is now seeking volunteers to help its fundraising efforts at Badminton, getting involved with activities such as selling raffle tickets and collecting donations. Applicants must be over 18 and can volunteer for one or more days of the event, from 1 to 4 May 2008. In return they will receive entry into the show. For more information, please contact Emma Vickers on 01993 825 568 or email [email protected] Advertisement Tagged with: Events Giving/Philanthropy AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Gardai seek help in bid to find missing Letterkenny teenager

first_img Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ A search is underway for a missing teenager from Letterkenny.Gardaí wish to seek the public’s assistance in tracing the whereabouts of 17 year Jamie O’Neill, who is missing from his home in Bonagee. Jamie was last seen on Wednesday last, April 24th, in Bonagee.He is described as being 5’9’’, he has dark brown hair and brown eyes. When last seen he was wearing a dark coloured tracksuit top. Anyone who has seen Jamie or who can assist in locating him is asked to contact Letterkenny Garda Station on (074) 9167100, The Garda Confidential Line 1800 666 111 or any Garda Station. Google+ Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme WhatsApp Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Twitter Facebook By News Highland – April 26, 2019 Homepage BannerNewscenter_img Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebook WhatsApp Gardai seek help in bid to find missing Letterkenny teenager Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Pinterest Twitter Previous articlePolice say the net is closing in on Lyra Mc Kee’s killerNext articlePenalty denies Harps first league win News Highland Pinterest Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens furtherlast_img read more

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Old Christmas: Historic Clay Hill Church hosts traditional candlelight service to end season

first_img Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Each year, BUMC church invites a couple with an infant to participate in the Old Christmas at Clay Hill service as Joseph, Mary and the Baby Jesus.Mike and Dava Foster said they were honored and humbled to be a part of the service. “It was a beautiful service and it was humbling to play such an important part in the service,” Mike Foster said. “It was a night that we’ll always remember. Chase won’t remember being Baby Jesus, but we’ll tell him about it and how special it was for us to be there with him and to worship in an atmosphere like they worshiped a long time ago.”Old Christmas at Clay Hill is an annual lantern-light service held at 6 p.m. on Jan. 6 at the historic one-room church at Clay Hill near Pronto. The benches are a little hard and the weather is usually cold but Bowden said hearts are warmed by the stories.and songs of Old Christmas. Print Article Email the author You Might Like Henderson earns state CMO desgination District 5 Councilmember Dejerilyn King Henderson of Troy has earned the professional designation of Certified Municipal Official after completing 40… read more Book Nook to reopen The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson By The Penny Hoarder Old Christmas at Clay Hill Wednesday was the culminating seasonal service for Christmas 2015. The service celebrated the arrival of the Wise Men to worship the Christ Child. Mike, Dava and Chase Foster participated as Joseph, Mary and Baby Jesus.Although the road leading to historic Clay Hill Church was closed, people still made their way to the annual Old Christmas at Clay Hill service on Wednesday.The Rev. Ed Shirley, pastor of Brundidge United Methodist Church, said Old Christmas at Clay Hill occurs on Epiphany, which means revelation or enlightenment of God’s plan for mankind.“The Old Christmas is a connection to the birth of Jesus and to all saints throughout the ages,” Shirley said. “It is a special connection to early American life and is an opportunity to worship in a simple, rustic kind of way. Old Christmas at Clay Hill is nostalgic and a wonderfully quiet way to celebrate the birth of Jesus and the coming of the Wise Men.”center_img By Jaine Treadwell Published 3:00 am Friday, January 8, 2016 Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Sponsored Content Latest Stories The service celebrates the arrival of the Wise Men to worship the Christ Child, the commemoration of which occurs annually on Jan. 6, also known as Old Christmas Day or the Epiphany.Some traditions say the celebration started in 1752 when England and Scotland switched from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar. Eleven days were dropped so in subsequent years, Christmas was celebrated 11 days earlier.Many people, especially, those in rural areas, continued to recognize the holidays of the Julian calendar so Jan. 6 became known as Old Christmas. Old Christmas: Historic Clay Hill Church hosts traditional candlelight service to end season Lawrence Bowden has participated in Old Christmas as a Wise Man since BUMC began the celebration nearly 20 years ago.“Old Christmas is a service that I look forward to every year,” Bowden said. “It’s inspiring – the scriptures and the songs – and it’s a fitting end to the Christmas season.”Bowden said being one of the Wise Men is a simple thing but it’s an honor to be a part of hearing the story of the Christ Child’s birth and the arrival of the Wise Men.“Old Christmas is a recalling of the events surrounding Jesus’ birth,” he said. “The Wise Men or the Three Kings came to worship Baby Jesus and brought gifts to honor him. When they left, they went another way so as not to endanger the Christ Child. That’s a wonderful story and one worth telling again and again.” Plans underway for historic Pike County celebrationlast_img read more

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Suspect in fatal University of Utah shooting found dead after manhunt

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(SALT LAKE CITY) — The University of Utah community is grieving after an “accomplished” student athlete was shot dead on campus Monday night, the school said.Lauren McCluskey, of Washington state, was found dead in a parked car on campus, witnesses told police, who have not announced a motive for the killing.McCluskey, a senior majoring in communication, was on the track and field team, the university said.The suspected shooter, Melvin Rowland, who killed himself, may have been an ex-boyfriend, authorities said.Rowland, 37, a registered sex offender, had been seen fleeing the Medical Towers, a dorm near the university’s northeastern edge, around the time of the shooting, authorities said.Rowland wasn’t a student there, police said.“They chased him to this location, where they found that he had forced entry into the church,” University of Utah Police Services Lt. Brian Wahlin said. “After clearing the building, they found our suspect deceased in a room in the church, suffering from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.”Rowland, a resident of Salt Lake City, was convicted of attempted forcible sex abuse and enticing a minor over the internet in 2004, court records show.Classes have been canceled Tuesday “to allow our campus community to grieve the senseless loss of this bright, young woman,” the university said in a statement. “We have made our counseling and support services available to students, staff and faculty.”McCluskey’s “family is understandably in shock at this news about their daughter,” the university added. “They are heartbroken. We have and continue to offer our full support to them at this terrible time.”Monday’s tragedy was the second deadly shooting at the university since last year.Student Austin Boutain, 24, was arrested in October 2017 after he fatally shot ChenWei Guo, a 23-year-old computer science major.Boutain entered a plea of guilty last month to aggravated murder, attempted aggravated murder and aggravated kidnapping, according to Salt Lake Tribune. He agreed to be sentenced to spend the rest of his life in prison.ABC News’ Marilyn Heck contributed to this report.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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A statistical study of polar mesosphere summer echoes observed by EISCAT

first_imgA comprehensive survey of data on ‘Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes’, observed by the EISCAT VHF radar during 1988–1993, confirms that (1) these echoes are a summer phenomenon, with a season lasting from June to August; (2) PMSE occur most frequently around noon and midnight, and thus follow a semidiurnal pattern; (3) PMSE occur at a mean height of 85±2 km; (4) there is often a good correlation between the vertical Doppler velocity and the rate of change of echo height, which suggests that the echoing structures move bodily, perhaps in response to gravity waves. Previous results on the lack of correlation between the occurrence of PMSE and noctilucent clouds are reinforced.last_img

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Bulgaria sets aside €419M for two new patrol vessels

first_img Bulgaria sets aside €419M for two new patrol vessels View post tag: Bulgarian Navy April 6, 2016 Authorities Back to overview,Home naval-today Bulgaria sets aside €419M for two new patrol vessels center_img Share this article Two multi-purpose patrol ships to be built for the Bulgarian Navy, including armament, equipment and communication systems, will cost the country €419M, Nikolay Nenchev, Bulgarian Defence Minister said.Bulgarian News agency Novinite reported the minister saying that the two vessels would be built within three and a half to six years.The newspaper further said that the government held talks with European and NATO member states about the potential acquisition of the ships.There is still very little information about the specifications of vessels to be procured.Bulgaria is looking to start the modernization of its navy which has been largely overlooked during its NATO admission process. The majority of Bulgarian Navy vessels are sitting idle in the port while only the newer, former Belgian Navy frigates, and a couple of corvettes remain in active service. View post tag: Patrol Vessellast_img read more

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Mey makes play for May Day carbon label

first_imgFood brand Mey Selections has become the first Scottish consumer goods company to put carbon labels on its products. Its Luxury Shortbread and two honey products will carry the Carbon Trust’s Carbon Reduction Label in stores from 1 May, and the company’s ultimate aim is to have the label on its entire range.Caithness-based Mey Selections is the brand name of North Highlands Products Ltd, a company formed by Caithness farmers to select and source supplies of quality farm and food products from the North Highlands.Mey Selections has been working with The Carbon Trust since February 2008, and the label signifies the company’s work to date and commitment to reducing its carbon footprint, it said.“Not only are we the first Scottish consumer goods company to achieve the certification, we are one of the first food and drink companies to become involved with the initiative,” commented John Strak, managing director of Mey Selections.“The Carbon Reduction Label footprinting process provided us with a structure for looking at energy use and carbon emissions. This step is just the beginning of our involvement with the initiative; by the end of 2009 we hope to have the Carbon Reduction Label on our bakery products such as the oatcakes and biscuits. The ultimate aim is to have the label featuring on all of our products.”last_img read more

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Two leaders, one Harvard

first_imgBACOW: Because we each took a first job that paid a pittance relative to some other jobs. So I think that the current narrative about higher education in the U.S. is one that we have to work really hard to change. As Drew says, people are questioning the value of a diploma. They are questioning the value of these institutions to society. They are questioning whether or not colleges and universities actually contribute to the American dream. That’s scary. We need to change that conversation.GAZETTE: As the incoming president of Harvard, what do you see as your greatest challenge in your first year?BACOW: One of the things which I learned during my time at Tufts is that a university presidency is a marathon, it’s not a sprint. And having run the Boston Marathon multiple times, I can tell you that one of the big mistakes that new marathon runners make is that they try to go out too fast. And so I anticipate spending a fair amount of this first year listening, learning. I know a lot about this institution from my time on the Corporation, but that’s nothing close to what I need to know in order to do this job effectively. I would say my biggest challenge is going to be getting to know Harvard really, really well, so that I can be an informed leader and make the kinds of judgments which Drew probably makes like that [snaps fingers].GAZETTE: Is there something outside of your personal lives, something that has had a big influence on the way you have run things? Anything outside of your professional lives that you have been able to bring into your careers?FAUST: Well, I get asked about this, and the more I am asked about it and the more I answer, the more I am convinced it is true, which is how history has influenced me — how it’s influenced my approach to thinking about this job. I’ve said often that leadership is about change. It’s about people resisting change or embracing change, it’s about bringing an organization through change. But I’ve been thinking recently about how the way I’ve always done history is to listen; to listen to voices from the past to try to figure out how they are seeing the world. And for me that’s how I ended up writing about death. Prior to “This Republic of Suffering,” I wrote a book about Confederate women, and what they were writing about all the time was death. So it was really reading their letters and listening to their voices that made me understand what I needed to say and do and what was important.I think that kind of training in historical listening has been an important part of it, the essence of listening as a leader, which, I think both of us agree, is seminal to how to get the work done.BACOW: It’s interesting how our scholarly backgrounds influence how we see the world and how we do our jobs. I spent a fair amount of time in my career doing research and thinking about bargaining and negotiation and dispute resolution. If you want to try to move a group you need to understand the different interests and perspectives and be able to respond to them. And you need to be able to frame issues in ways so that people can imagine a future that’s different from the past, and can see how there’s a place for them in that future.So, in the same way, Drew, that you probably look at life through the lens of history, I tend to look at life through a lens in which I am trying to understand how one can bring people to consensus, or at least how to create an unblocked coalition. In other words, you can’t always get everybody to agree on a path, but at least if you get enough people to agree it allows you to move forward. In that respect I think my scholarly background also plays a role in how I lead.FAUST: Which came first? Did you become an economist because this was your perspective on the world, or is this the perspective you have because you are an economist? I wonder about that a lot. Was I attracted to history because I tended to see things this way? Or are both true?BACOW: This is what in economics we would call an identification problem [laughs]. I’d have to spend a fair amount of time on somebody’s couch in order to figure that one out. But, you know, it’s also the case that while our disciplinary lenses can help us see and understand the world in ways that we might not otherwise see them, they can also be constricting. And it’s important to understand when to take the glasses off and see the world in different ways. There are times when I have to stop being an economist, and I assume you have to stop being a historian.FAUST: That reminds me of a story about Larry Summers sitting in that chair and me sitting here for five years of his presidency while I was the Radcliffe dean. He talked about the world in a way that was so different from my take on the world, in that things were about numbers and things were about reducing complexity. Humanists always want to enhance complexity. I ended up writing a chapter in “This Republic of Suffering” that I don’t think I would have written had I not had those interactions. It’s a chapter about numbers, about counting the dead and what numbers came to mean and how thinking about numbers was a way to try to grapple with the ineffability of the tragedy. It was really sort of seeing, almost as an anthropologist, how Larry’s mind worked that made me able to see different things in my research.GAZETTE: Can it be daunting, trying to grapple with a wealth of information and knowledge from different sources? Do you ever feel overwhelmed?FAUST: It’s humbling.BACOW: Yes, it is humbling. And you need to approach conversations with humility. I think that’s really important.FAUST: A kind of respect for the craft and culture of the field that you are exploring.BACOW: But at the same time we are also constantly being asked to make judgments about scholarship, about who is worthy of promotion, about who ought to be a dean, about taste, good judgment. And we are being asked to assess people in fields radically distant from our own as well. This is why approaching these decisions with humility is important.GAZETTE: President Faust, you have spoken about how growing up in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley had a strong impact on your choices and your love of history. Incoming President Bacow, I wonder if you could talk about your own background and if being the son of Jewish immigrants from Holocaust-era Europe may have affected the choices you made in your life?BACOW: I think I’ve always felt a certain sense of responsibility to others. I said this when I was introduced to the Harvard community. I think my life in so many respects mirrors that of so many other people whose families came to this country in search of opportunity. This country has just been enormously good to me, and so a lot of what motivates me, a lot of the reasons I agreed to take this job, especially at this point in time for all the reasons we discussed earlier, is to ensure that others have access to the American dream just as I have. So in that respect, I do think it affects my view of the world. It affects how I see my role in the world, and for those of us who have been blessed to be able to study in places like this, to be able to work in places like this, I do think we bear a special responsibility to use the gifts that we’ve been given to try to make the world a better place.GAZETTE: Did either of you have a sense of what you wanted to be when you were young? President Faust, I think you wanted to be a veterinarian?FAUST: Yes, animals are very important to me and always have been. I grew up on a farm and I raised every animal you can imagine as a child. Horses, cattle, sheep, goats, chickens, dogs, cats.BACOW: As a kid growing up I was really interested in science and math. I entered science fairs. I built Heathkits.GAZETTE: Where did that interest come from?BACOW: I loved numbers. I loved science. I read voraciously about science from the time I was really young. I actually ended up going to MIT because I kept reading about it in Popular Science and Scientific American. But I never actually thought I would be a scientist. I always thought I wanted to be a lawyer. It was only after I went to law school that I figured out I didn’t. I am not sorry I went to law school, but I realized I wasn’t cut out to practice law. I was enrolled in a joint degree program between Harvard Law School and Harvard Kennedy School and decided to complete the work for a Ph.D. from the Kennedy School, not intending to be an academic. I thought I was going to go work, with the start of the Carter administration, in Washington, D.C. Then I had an opportunity to fill in for somebody who was on leave from MIT for two years. A two-year, nontenured track. When I was contemplating whether or not to do it I went back to see my mentor at MIT, Bob Solow. He said, “You know, the government will be there when you are ready to go work for it.” So I took the job at MIT and two years turned into 24. And I am still at it on some level.GAZETTE: I noticed an interesting parallel in your childhoods. President Faust, you were in the 4-H Club and the Brownies, while incoming President Bacow was a Boy Scout who eventually made it to Eagle Scout. Were these formative experiences?FAUST: 4-H was very important to me. I loved the responsibility of taking care of this steer and learning all about animal husbandry, and the county agent would stop by to see how I was doing. So it was a lot of fun.BACOW: I learned a lot in Boy Scouts. One of the things which I learned is that I enjoy teaching. I went to Boy Scout camp one summer — you would only go for a week — and at the end of the week they realized that the person who was supposed to teach the next cooking merit badge session wasn’t going to show up, so they needed somebody to do that.FAUST: So you have a cooking merit badge?BACOW: Oh, I do. Not only that but I taught cooking merit badge.FAUST: Wow, I should have recognized that when I had that delicious dinner back in 2007.BACOW: In fact, the final project for each of my students was that they had to bake a pie in a Dutch oven over an open flame. It was the first time I ever had an opportunity to teach, and I realized I enjoyed teaching. That’s where the seed was planted. But I also learned a lot of other useful life skills. Since their first meeting 10 years ago, Drew Faust and Larry Bacow have become invaluable sources of support and advice to each other, as well as good friends. The 28th Harvard president and the 29th sat down at Massachusetts Hall for a conversation that ranged from their childhoods in Virginia and Michigan, respectively, to the art of listening, to the role of colleges and universities in supporting the American dream.Bacow, former chancellor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and president of Tufts University from 2001 to 2011, is a lawyer and economist by training whose research focuses on environmental policy. He will succeed Faust on July 1.GAZETTE: Can you tell me how you met?FAUST: When I was named president in 2007, Larry was president of Tufts, and he called up and invited Charles and me to dinner the first night of my presidency. So on July 1, 2007, Charles and I went to the president’s house. [Charles Rosenberg is President Faust’s husband.]Larry and Adele cooked dinner for us. [Bacow is married to Adele Fleet Bacow.] So that was a lovely beginning. And there is a kind of addendum to this. About a year, a year and a half ago, when I confided to Larry that I was going to be stepping down, we made a date to have dinner on the first night of my non-presidency, which turns out to be the first night of his presidency, which I think neither one of us had anticipated at the moment we set the date.BACOW: Absolutely.FAUST: So on July 1, 2018, we will be having dinner, and by all fairness I ought to cook, but I don’t think I am going to have a kitchen, a place to live.GAZETTE: Where will it be?BACOW: It’s going to be at our place.FAUST: The first day after you step down, I will cook for you. There’s a new date.BACOW: There you go.FAUST: Just to build on this, after we met, Larry was hugely helpful to me as a new president, especially after the financial crisis, when we were both facing things that neither one of us had ever faced before. We did a kind of home-and-home arrangement, where I’d go to Tufts to the president’s house, or he would come to Elmwood.BACOW: We’d open up a nice bottle of something, we’d put a significant dent in it, and we’d commiserate.FAUST: And the financial crisis looked so much better after those conversations.,BACOW: When I announced that I was leaving Tufts, I was invited to join the Harvard Corporation, and then we just kept seeing each other. A number of people have asked me about the transition and I keep telling them that this transition is actually much easier than the transition to Tufts because I know the place better. It knows me as well. I think for the last seven years, once a month you and I have had breakfast or lunch and once a month [Provost] Alan [Garber] and I have had breakfast or lunch, which means, since those are often staggered, about every other week I’ve had breakfast or lunch with one of you. To say nothing of all the other meals I have eaten in service to Harvard. So we’ve really gotten to know each other quite well.GAZETTE: What are the most important things you have learned from each other during your respective 10 years leading Harvard and Tufts?FAUST: I remember one of our meetings in the living room at the president’s house at Tufts in the middle of the financial crisis, you shared with me a statement that you had delivered to the Tufts community. I remember thinking, “This is so admirably straightforward. So open about what’s going on, so direct.” I think Larry’s directness during that time was an inspiration to me and reinforcing of instincts that I might have had but may not have dared to act on quite so directly. So that was a big influence.BACOW: Thank you. I’ve learned a lot from Drew over the last seven years about Harvard. Drew has managed with incredible grace to bring Harvard together. We talk about “One Harvard,” but it’s the way in which she has engaged people that I will try to emulate. She’s been a wonderful listener, which is important for any president. But she’s also been a forceful advocate internally for a set of principles and values. You have been very consistent in your messages, and I think that that’s how you get things done, especially in a place that’s as large and decentralized as this one. So there are many things that I will try to emulate, but I can only hope to come close to Drew’s style and grace.GAZETTE: Will you continue to connect with each other for advice and suggestions?,BACOW: Oh, yeah. I kid Drew that I’ve added up all the phone calls and the meals together when she has been asking me for advice. So I have this big account surplus which I intend to spend down now. Drew will be on speed dial, trust me. And of course, I will be channeling her at times as well.FAUST: At his request, I will do whatever he asks. I was touched because Katie Tiger, who does my schedule, said, “Larry’s called up and he wants to schedule time with you,” and I thought, Well, I’m not going to be president anymore. She said, “He wants to connect the way you did, once a month.”BACOW: Exactly, once a month. If Charles will allow. Both of our spouses have sort of suffered through these periods where they have had to share us with the rest of the world: Right? And now Charles gets you back, and not just Charles, but your daughter and your friends.GAZETTE: Can you both speak a little bit more about how you balance these public-facing roles with your private lives?BACOW: I think Adele and I have had an advantage, at least relative to many college and university presidents, because we’ve lived in Boston since we came here as freshmen in 1969. And so we have all of these wonderful friends who have known us forever as Adele and Larry. I think when people move to a new city and they show up in these roles, it’s really, really hard to make the kind of friendships that permit you to be unguarded, open, where you share some of your personal frustrations at times with people where it’s safe to do so. And so we are blessed with these friends, and they will still be our friends now that we moved into these new roles. So that’s helped us to preserve a sense of private time.Our children are very important to us. They live in New York City. We have two sons, both married with families of their own. Drew tells me that she’s actually spent a little bit of time in New York during her tenure as president of Harvard, so I am assuming I will have plenty of opportunities to get there as well. But finding time for family and friends is hard. You make a lot of sacrifices in these jobs.FAUST: How old was your youngest son when you started as chancellor at MIT?BACOW: It was Jay’s freshman year in college, so Kenny was a junior in high school.FAUST: So they were pretty far along before you really took on big administrative responsibilities.BACOW: They were. But Adele and Kenny actually did an intervention at one point with me. As chancellor I was going into the office every weekend and they finally had to sit me down to say, “Something has to change.” I went in to talk to [then-MIT President] Chuck Vest the next day, and said, “I am willing to sacrifice a lot for MIT and for this job, but not my family.” And he said: “Absolutely right.” So I restructured things.It’s interesting, when I moved into the presidency in some ways I found it easier to manage my schedule than when I was chancellor at MIT.FAUST: Because you were in charge?BACOW: Because I was in charge. You control your own schedule to a much greater degree as president.,FAUST: The advice I would give to any new dean or anybody taking on a big position is: “You are the only person who has your interests at heart in terms of time management. Everyone else is going to try to get you to do stuff, so take control of it.”GAZETTE: I wanted to ask both of you about people you have sought out for advice.FAUST: Oh, my gosh, there are lists and lists and lists.GAZETTE: Anyone who comes to the top?FAUST: Members of our governing board. Different people at different times. Bill Lee has been a wonderful mentor to me from the moment we first met each other at a dinner during the presidential search. A person of such good judgment, and calm in the face of whatever is going on, with a deep understanding of Harvard. He has been terrific. But I am a big advice-seeker. I talk to anybody I can find that I think might have a perspective. I talk to alums when I am on a development visit, and if someone has great accomplishments in running an organization or thinking about financial questions, I just seek their advice on whatever issues are troubling me at the moment.BACOW: In addition to Drew, when I was at Tufts there were a couple of other presidents I always turned to. One was Chuck Vest, another was Bill Bowen, former president of Princeton and the Mellon Foundation, another one was Jim Freedman, the former president of Dartmouth. With certain things I think it’s helpful to talk to people who have sat in the same chair, if not at the same institution.And then we have these wonderful friends who we go way back with. We had a dinner party the first or second year that we were married — this is over 40 years ago. We invited three couples that did not know each other at the time. And the eight of us, joined by one other couple — newbies because they joined 17 years ago — have been getting together for dinner ever since. We’ve grown up together. A couple of us are academics, one is a federal judge, one ran another huge organization. So there’s a lot of life experience there. I can’t think of an issue where I couldn’t learn from people in that group.GAZETTE: Could you both weigh in on what you see as the greatest challenge facing higher education today in the U.S.?FAUST: I would say skepticism about the value of higher education, and skepticism about higher education’s product: facts, science, knowledge, an educated citizenry that is not just narrowly trained but broadly educated. We have to make a case for all of those things, and a lot of our other challenges derive from the reality that I just described.BACOW: I would agree. I think as the real cost of higher education has increased people have adopted more of a consumerist or instrumental approach to higher education. What does it do for me? What’s the return on it in the very narrow, short term? There’s a proposal to evaluate colleges and universities based on the incomes of their graduates after their first job. By that metric, Drew, both you and I would have been considered failures coming out of our alma maters.FAUST: Yep. “One of the things which I learned during my time at Tufts is that a university presidency is a marathon, it’s not a sprint. And having run the Boston Marathon multiple times, I can tell you that one of the big mistakes that new marathon runners make is that they try to go out too fast. And so I anticipate spending a fair amount of this first year listening, learning.” — Larry Bacow The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. GAZETTE: I wonder how being a professor has helped inform leadership for each of you?FAUST: It was absolutely defining in that it gives you a perspective on the university from one of the most, if not the most, important elements of the university — the faculty. They are the ones who live through an era at a university, and have so much responsibility and power in university governance, and embody the intellectual mission of the place. So understanding that culture and those values was very important. On a more instrumental level I think that teaching large classes, lecturing, answering questions, having to explain things to people, was an invaluable preparation for the kind of work a president does. It’s about learning how to communicate and explaining things to people that they might not understand initially or that they might not know about, and responding to their queries about issues. Those are all things that are very much a part of my life every day.BACOW: I avoided academic administration for 21 of my 24 years as a faculty member.FAUST: You know both of us did that. We are both really late starters.BACOW: I loved the life of a faculty member. Why screw it up? It was a wonderful life. When I moved into administration, when I became chancellor at MIT, I found that there was an interesting opportunity to fix things that bothered me as a faculty member and it was very gratifying to be able to do that. Now what I say all the time, because I believe it, and I know Drew does as well, is the job of an administration, our job, is to enable faculty to do their best work, their best teaching, their best scholarship. And I think if you haven’t done it yourself, you don’t know what that is. And so I think we do what we do because we believe in the work of the faculty. If we didn’t, then I think we would be miscast in these roles.FAUST: Well put. “I worry sometimes that we don’t take enough joy in what the work of this place is. It’s very serious work and it’s work that has enormous relevance and impact, and changes lives, as you were describing. But it’s also so miraculous to be here with people learning and discovering and to be sharing that with them.” — Drew Faust GAZETTE: What’s the hardest part about being a university president?BACOW: The hardest part is keeping your waistline under control [laughter]. I used to joke when I was at Tufts that my real title was not president, it was university stomach. But I ate in service to the institution.FAUST: Yes, eating for Harvard.BACOW: Don’t you find it that way?FAUST: Oh, yes.BACOW: So that was one of the hardest things.FAUST: I think the hardest part is just having to be steady and always know that how you react to a situation is going to affect so many people around you. In a moment of difficulty or crisis or whatever it might be, you need to be a symbol of the institution. The responsibility is wonderful in many ways because it comes with the ability to do things and to fix things and to change things and accomplish things. But it is also in itself a huge responsibility.BACOW: One piece of advice I give to every new university president I speak to is to always do the right thing. It’s usually not that difficult to figure out; it’s often excruciatingly difficult to do. And being able to constantly focus on what’s the right thing for the institution long-term. Watching how others have maintained their balance through difficult times can be very instructive and very reassuring. These jobs are not for the faint of heart.GAZETTE: President Faust, is there one piece of advice you would offer your friend as he steps into this role?FAUST: Make sure you do things that just give you joy. There is so much around this campus. In the myriad of choices and obligations that people will present to you, make sure you put lots of them in there that you enjoy. Because there is much joy to be had, and I worry sometimes that we don’t take enough joy in what the work of this place is. It’s very serious work and it’s work that has enormous relevance and impact, and changes lives, as you were describing. But it’s also so miraculous to be here with people learning and discovering and to be sharing that with them. So celebrate that.BACOW: I will.GAZETTE: Thank you both so much for taking the time.FAUST: Of course.BACOW: This was fun.GAZETTE: My last question, for incoming President Bacow: Red Sox or Detroit Tigers?BACOW: Red Sox, Bruins, Celtics, Patriots.last_img read more

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